Monday, Sep 22, 2014
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TheyRclueless - Lovelace autopsy questions grow - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
This is going to be one very interesting trial but more sad than anything. It may be one that we see on Dateline or 20/20. I totally agree with Qcy Guy.
qfingers - QPD nabs 66 in latest STEP detail - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
It isn't, per se, illegal "in your car" but it is illegal "in a public place" which is defined in our municipal code as "reasonably...expected to be viewed by others' which would hold true for a car...and especially if an officer approaches your window for whatever reason. Might they tell you to cover up and move on? Maybe....but they wouldn't be required to ignore your offense.
GuyFawkes10 - QPD nabs 66 in latest STEP detail - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
And the passenger as well?
XBgCty - QPD nabs 66 in latest STEP detail - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Because you are in a car and driving. So they ask to see the Drivers License. Standard at any traffic stop, should also ask for the insurance card.
ONCEMORE1 - QPD nabs 66 in latest STEP detail - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Without all the Smart-Ass commentary.....

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Ex-Gov. George Ryan returns, talks death penalty

2 months, 2 weeks ago Michael Tarm, Associated Press

Says he would like to campaign for the end of the death penalty in the U.S.

From Michael Tarm, Associated Press:
George Ryan, an ex-Illinois governor and now an ex-convict, says he’d like to re-engage with the cause he left behind when he went to prison in 2007 — campaigning for the end of the death penalty in the U.S.
“Americans should come to their senses,” Ryan said this week, in an hourlong interview with The Associated Press at his kitchen table.
Newly free to speak after a year of federal supervision that followed his more than five years in prison for corruption, Ryan appeared to have recovered some of his old voice and feistiness, in contrast to the subdued figure that emerged a year ago from the federal penitentiary in Terre Haute, Indiana, and ducked briefly into a Chicago halfway house.
At his home in Kankakee, south of Chicago, the 80-year-old Republican held forth on capital punishment, the state of American politics and the criminal justice system - though not the difficult details of his own corruption case.
He said he’d like to spend some time on the national circuit to encourage other states to follow Illinois’ lead in abolishing capital punishment in 2011, which stemmed from Ryan’s decision to clear death row in 2003. While he was treated as a champion by death penalty opponents at the time, he acknowledged some public figures now may have trouble openly associating with him.
“I’m an ex-convict,” he said. “People tend to frown on that.”
Ryan, who was governor from 1999 to 2003, was indicted in 2003 and convicted in 2006 on multiple corruption counts, including racketeering and tax fraud. He said he does not plan to discuss the details of the criminal case — to which he always maintained his innocence — though he might in an autobiography he is writing.
Ryan hasn’t apologized for actions that prosecutors and jurors deemed criminal.
“I spent five years in apology,” he said, bristling. “I paid the price they asked me to pay.”
He also lashed out at the U.S. justice system, calling it “corrupt” and bluntly contending that the fervor with which he was prosecuted was due in part to his nationally prominent campaign to end the death penalty.
“It put a target on my back when I did what I did,” he said, adding that even prison guards derided and mocked him. “It certainly didn’t win me any favor with the federal authorities.”
It’s unclear whether Ryan’s re-emergence on the public scene will be welcomed. But at least one former federal prosecutor balked at Ryan’s contention that he may have been singled out because of his death penalty stance.
“It’s absurd,” said Jeff Cramer, a former U.S. attorney in Chicago, noting that four of Illinois’ last seven governors have gone to prison. “It wasn’t his political stand that made him a target. It is what he did ... He’s trying to rewrite history.”

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