Thursday, Dec 18, 2014
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qfingers - QPS Board approves higher 2014 tax levy - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
I do believe Bud has sworn to vote no on all expenditures until QPS does a forensic audit. I seem to remember reading that before... http://www.qps.org/files/board/Minutes_201011/042...
UrKidsWillPay - QPS Board approves higher 2014 tax levy - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
His supporters also don't see the people who whisper in his ear all the time. He is being used by some people who have an ax to grind against the school district but don't have the stones to run for the board or publicly press their vendettas. You almost have to have pity on the man. In the south, everything they would say about a guy like Bud would be prefaced or followed by "Bless his…
qfingers - Adams County Board to vote on quarter cent sales tax to build jail - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal
Here's some math for you just for fun...just building costs...not operating costs. New jail $37M -- apparently they last about 65 years. # of inmates ~84 Cost per year $569,231 Cost per inmate per year $6,777 Cost per inmate per day $18.57 Cost per person per year for Adams County population -- $8.47
Quincyan2 - QPS Board approves higher 2014 tax levy - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Bud is incapable of understanding most of the issues, so he feels it is best to abstain or vote no. I don't think there is much rational to his actions other than he gets a pat on the back from the folks that support him. I don't think he has brought forth a solution or innovative idea in years, he just fills the chair. Frankly its sad to watch him during the meetings, but his supporters…
Snarky_2 - Adams County Board to vote on quarter cent sales tax to build jail - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal
In the underground parking lot or in the city lot on 5th and Vermont or somewhere else and transport staff who are not a threat to anyone.

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QHS presents Vespers 2014

Ex-Gov. George Ryan returns, talks death penalty

5 months, 1 week ago Michael Tarm, Associated Press

Says he would like to campaign for the end of the death penalty in the U.S.

From Michael Tarm, Associated Press:
George Ryan, an ex-Illinois governor and now an ex-convict, says he’d like to re-engage with the cause he left behind when he went to prison in 2007 — campaigning for the end of the death penalty in the U.S.
“Americans should come to their senses,” Ryan said this week, in an hourlong interview with The Associated Press at his kitchen table.
Newly free to speak after a year of federal supervision that followed his more than five years in prison for corruption, Ryan appeared to have recovered some of his old voice and feistiness, in contrast to the subdued figure that emerged a year ago from the federal penitentiary in Terre Haute, Indiana, and ducked briefly into a Chicago halfway house.
At his home in Kankakee, south of Chicago, the 80-year-old Republican held forth on capital punishment, the state of American politics and the criminal justice system - though not the difficult details of his own corruption case.
He said he’d like to spend some time on the national circuit to encourage other states to follow Illinois’ lead in abolishing capital punishment in 2011, which stemmed from Ryan’s decision to clear death row in 2003. While he was treated as a champion by death penalty opponents at the time, he acknowledged some public figures now may have trouble openly associating with him.
“I’m an ex-convict,” he said. “People tend to frown on that.”
Ryan, who was governor from 1999 to 2003, was indicted in 2003 and convicted in 2006 on multiple corruption counts, including racketeering and tax fraud. He said he does not plan to discuss the details of the criminal case — to which he always maintained his innocence — though he might in an autobiography he is writing.
Ryan hasn’t apologized for actions that prosecutors and jurors deemed criminal.
“I spent five years in apology,” he said, bristling. “I paid the price they asked me to pay.”
He also lashed out at the U.S. justice system, calling it “corrupt” and bluntly contending that the fervor with which he was prosecuted was due in part to his nationally prominent campaign to end the death penalty.
“It put a target on my back when I did what I did,” he said, adding that even prison guards derided and mocked him. “It certainly didn’t win me any favor with the federal authorities.”
It’s unclear whether Ryan’s re-emergence on the public scene will be welcomed. But at least one former federal prosecutor balked at Ryan’s contention that he may have been singled out because of his death penalty stance.
“It’s absurd,” said Jeff Cramer, a former U.S. attorney in Chicago, noting that four of Illinois’ last seven governors have gone to prison. “It wasn’t his political stand that made him a target. It is what he did ... He’s trying to rewrite history.”

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Bob Gough 3 minutes ago

@DOB23 You shouldn't. You have two kids capable of doing that.
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Christmas crafts and snacks at the Quincy Family YMCA http://t.co/KU47oPhb5n
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RT @Jeff Dunetz: CBS Poll: Fewer Americans Find Healthcare Affordable (Thank You Obamacare) http://t.co/fCZn9UNTOo #tcot #tlot #teaparty #twisters #tcot_talk