Friday, May 29, 2015
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CoolEdge - Updated NASA Data: Global Warming Not Causing Any Polar Ice Retreat - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJourna
It was your U of I boyz quote that started the "name calling", so by your "rules", you lost long ago. "The rest of Taylor’s article is just whitewash intended to distract readers from these facts." So they say he's intentionally lying, but he actually clearly stated his points. It is the lack of accounting for the 30 years of cooling prior to the 1979 data that is dishonest. Here is…
Expatriate - Updated NASA Data: Global Warming Not Causing Any Polar Ice Retreat - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJourna
I think you're right, and my description was an over simplified description of why they come up with different values: http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/faq/ Area measurements treat the data cells differently than extent measurements treat the data cells. If it's 15% ice, the cell does not count toward extent, but Area…
1950Brutus - Updated NASA Data: Global Warming Not Causing Any Polar Ice Retreat - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJourna
How much is Al Gore being paid?? - and he isn't even a scientist, only a doctor of buffoonery.
qfingers - Updated NASA Data: Global Warming Not Causing Any Polar Ice Retreat - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJourna
I thought the extent measurements were pixelated results with at least 10% ice coverage so includes holes. That's my understanding of it from what I read. Measuring different things would make sense. But the difference doesn't help bolster the case that "all the science agrees" when it obviously doesn't.
Expatriate - Updated NASA Data: Global Warming Not Causing Any Polar Ice Retreat - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJourna
But when you find that their logic and science is wrong, and they are intentionally misleading the public----and you learn they are paid $80,000 to do so by an organization highly dependent on funding from the fossil fuel industry, it should infuriate the average person. In the same way that they trashed medical science and trotted out a bunch of pseudoscience to protect big tobacco (donors). That…

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Dirksen's leadership on the 1964 Civil Rights Act a prime example of working for the common good

11 months, 2 weeks ago From pjstar.com

Fifty years ago this week, history was made by a central Illinoisan when Pekin’s Sen. Everett Dirksen, a staunch conservative, wrangled enough votes to help break a filibuster and ensure Senate passage of the landmark 1964 Civil Rights Act.
He was an integral part of negotiations on the bill from the start, despite leading a superminority caucus in a government where all levers of power were controlled by the opposition.
You don’t quite see that kind of working together for the common good as often in this more fractured, cynical era, and arguably Congress is the poorer for it — certainly something that’s shown with overall approval ratings hovering around those of the less-popular diseases.
But we didn’t want to focus on the negative this week. Central Illinois is renowned for producing leaders of conscience, people who prioritize improving the country above scoring political points or beating the opposition — people like Dirksen and his successors Bob Michel and Ray LaHood.
Who do the current folks holding congressional seats for the area point to when they think of our modern-day Dirksens?
Rep. Cheri Bustos pointed back to LaHood — out of government service, but still a player on national issues — because of his ability to put people over politics consistently throughout a decades-long career.
And the East Moline Democrat said that Illinois’ congressional delegation is unusual, perhaps even unique, in the fact that they have regular, bipartisan monthly lunch meetings. She’s “gotten to know many of her Illinois colleagues on both a personal and professional level through these regular lunches,” spokesman Colin Milligan said. That’s something that makes it harder to demonize and easier to work together.
Rep. Aaron Schock argued that now, as then, coalitions form on a situational, case-by-case basis. That means that, in his eyes, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., would qualify.
“To the degree we do immigration reform ever, (he) has to be credited with the work that he led” in the Senate, the Peoria Republican said. “(Illinois’ U.S. Sen.) Dick Durbin actually said that if immigration reform happens, Marco Rubio deserves the credit.”
Schock said that those personalities filling a Dirksen-like role can shift and change with the debate, but “each moment throughout our history cries out for leadership. … Dirksen was emblematic of someone who was willing to take the political fallout and make the tough decisions because, in his words, he’d rather be right than consistent.”


Read more: http://www.pjstar.com/article/20140608/News/140609228#ixzz3490VfCIh


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