Thursday, Sep 18, 2014
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WarCry - QPD nabs 66 in latest STEP detail - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
The only people resenting the police are those who are too ignorant to know what the police actually do.
WarCry - QPD nabs 66 in latest STEP detail - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
A few years ago, a van was stopped for the "low-hanging fruit" of having the license plate bulb burned out. It was a routine stop that resulted in the seizure of over 500lbs of marijuana. What you deem as "accidental" is not as random as you think. It's a numbers game, and as much as you want to complain about it (a lot, apparently), it's been proven legal at every level of court system…
migraine_in_qcy - QPD nabs 66 in latest STEP detail - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
I'm not sure what your point was in re-posting the blotter, other than you like to see comments with your name at the top. Seat belt enforcement is just picking low-hanging fruit. Violators are usually tame and compliant and usually pay their fines: hence, easy revenue stream for the gubmint. The fact that they accidentally round up a real criminal once in awhile just helps people ignore away…
migraine_in_qcy - Survey says: GREDF, City of Quincy and Adams County get some answers - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJourn
That's all fine and dandy, but what is GREDF doing to try and improve the business climate in Illinois? Is GREDF openly supporting political candidates that are low-tax and pro-business? Is GREDF lobbying or helping fund lobbyists at the state level to promote pro-business laws? It's great to talk about retention, but when Illinois is doing everything it can to stifle business growth, surveys…
whiner1 - QPD nabs 66 in latest STEP detail - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
STEP is a waste of taxpayer money. We are spending 7 million or so already to catch all the bad guys. The State of Illinois is broke. It is ridiculous to add another layer of law enforcement on top of what we already have. I intend to tell all my reps. to quit wasting my money on more enforcement. Enough is enough. These petty tickets are just sucking money out of the local economy and causing more…

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Illinois Senate approves ride-sharing regulations

4 months ago from Associated Press

The Senate passed a proposal that would place statewide rules on the unregulated industry that connects passengers and drivers through a smartphone app

SPRINGFIELD -- A plan in the Illinois legislature that's close to reaching the governor's desk for approval would devastate the ride-sharing industry in the state, companies including Uber, Lyft and Sidecar say.

The Senate passed a proposal with strong support Thursday that would place statewide rules on the unregulated industry that connects passengers and drivers through a smartphone app. Its burgeoning popularity in the Chicago area and across the country comes much to the chagrin of taxi company owners, who say the new innovation should play by the same rules as cabs.

The new rules would level the playing field and allow the competitors to survive, said Mara Georges, an attorney for the Illinois Transportation Trade Association, which represents taxi and chauffeur livery companies.

She also said the rules would help taxi companies keep their drivers "as opposed to having this tremendous movement ... to the ride-sharing companies."

The legislation sponsored by Democratic state Sen. Tony Munoz of Chicago would create two tiers of regulation.

All drivers would need to pass background checks and have commercial liability insurance of at least $350,000. Drivers working more than 36 hours in a two-week period would need to follow stricter rules, similar to taxis. Local municipalities could set rules for "surge pricing" -- which allows drivers to hike prices during high demand -- for rides dispatched through a smartphone app.

"The bill protects taxi special interests who are working to stifle competition and protect their monopoly," Uber wrote in a statement, adding that the proposal "damages consumer choice, safety, economic development, and the ability of municipalities to regulate transportation services."

Lyft and Sidecar representatives have made similar statements.

The plan passed the Senate as two pieces of legislation. The second still needs approval from the House, which voted 80-26 last month to pass the first ride-sharing regulation measure. A spokesman for Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn said the administration hasn't taken a position yet.

"There is widespread, substantive support for regulations of ride-sharing apps. No one's trying to put any of these apps out of business. We're just trying to make sure our constituents are safe," said Riverside Democratic state Rep. Michael Zalewski, who's sponsoring the legislation in the House.

The city of Chicago is still trying to pass its own ride-sharing ordinance.


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