Wednesday, Jul 30, 2014
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Stupid_Dems - City of Quincy to spend $342,000 on road salt - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Difference is transportation cost
luanjo3 - Fast food workers vow civil disobedience - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
There is all kinds of assistance already out there for the single mothers that you speak of, and they take full advantage of it. I've heard of single mothers getting so much financial aid to go back to school that they have money left over. Then they drop out because hey, they didn't have to pay for it. Single moms who get so much EITC on their tax returns that they can go out and get…
pjohnf - White House Pressed to Keep RFS, Biodiesel Industries Strong - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Franken and Senator just seem to me to be oxymoronic, they just don't go together.
gizzard93 - City of Quincy to spend $342,000 on road salt - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
sounds like double talk to me.
SeenTheLight1 - City of Quincy to spend $342,000 on road salt - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Never heard of such a thing. Cities and counties along with townships submit their request, then CMS uses that total for their RFP. If a supplier cannot meet that total then I would guess some could be left off the RFP total, but have never heard of that. The other comment states " bids range from $70 to $140 per ton" so why is Quincy paying $95 per ton? Still I have never heard of CMS cutting off…

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Illinois Senate approves ride-sharing regulations

2 months, 2 weeks ago from Associated Press

The Senate passed a proposal that would place statewide rules on the unregulated industry that connects passengers and drivers through a smartphone app

SPRINGFIELD -- A plan in the Illinois legislature that's close to reaching the governor's desk for approval would devastate the ride-sharing industry in the state, companies including Uber, Lyft and Sidecar say.

The Senate passed a proposal with strong support Thursday that would place statewide rules on the unregulated industry that connects passengers and drivers through a smartphone app. Its burgeoning popularity in the Chicago area and across the country comes much to the chagrin of taxi company owners, who say the new innovation should play by the same rules as cabs.

The new rules would level the playing field and allow the competitors to survive, said Mara Georges, an attorney for the Illinois Transportation Trade Association, which represents taxi and chauffeur livery companies.

She also said the rules would help taxi companies keep their drivers "as opposed to having this tremendous movement ... to the ride-sharing companies."

The legislation sponsored by Democratic state Sen. Tony Munoz of Chicago would create two tiers of regulation.

All drivers would need to pass background checks and have commercial liability insurance of at least $350,000. Drivers working more than 36 hours in a two-week period would need to follow stricter rules, similar to taxis. Local municipalities could set rules for "surge pricing" -- which allows drivers to hike prices during high demand -- for rides dispatched through a smartphone app.

"The bill protects taxi special interests who are working to stifle competition and protect their monopoly," Uber wrote in a statement, adding that the proposal "damages consumer choice, safety, economic development, and the ability of municipalities to regulate transportation services."

Lyft and Sidecar representatives have made similar statements.

The plan passed the Senate as two pieces of legislation. The second still needs approval from the House, which voted 80-26 last month to pass the first ride-sharing regulation measure. A spokesman for Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn said the administration hasn't taken a position yet.

"There is widespread, substantive support for regulations of ride-sharing apps. No one's trying to put any of these apps out of business. We're just trying to make sure our constituents are safe," said Riverside Democratic state Rep. Michael Zalewski, who's sponsoring the legislation in the House.

The city of Chicago is still trying to pass its own ride-sharing ordinance.


From the Newsroom

Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 2 hours, 5 minutes ago

@keithcleer HAHAHA!
QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 2 hours, 47 minutes ago

Sheriff reveals attempted jailbreak - Three men tried to escape Sunday http://t.co/zh0b95aGYR
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 3 hours, 10 minutes ago

@KeeneMLB Me too.
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 3 hours, 13 minutes ago

aaaand...On cue, Cards fans bemoaning giving up Ramsey for Masterson. #goodlordpeople