Friday, Jul 3, 2015
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Expatriate - How the SSM “anti-polygamy” movement turned into Animal Farm - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJ
It's quite possible. Genes do not always inevitably have their effect. The effect could depend upon the environment. I could be carrying and pass along whatever gene(s) necessary for homosexuality to my children even though I'm straight.
Sam_Sam_Iam - How the SSM “anti-polygamy” movement turned into Animal Farm - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJ
So, it is my OPINION that this is wrong in your eyes. Everyone has an opinion and has the freedom to voice their ideas and concerns. You won't see me getting bent out of shape when you express yours, just have the courtesy and freedom to allow me to express mine. There are verifiable instances where scenarios already exists, or have been tried, just look them up. Just saying that a plural marriage…
Expatriate - How the SSM “anti-polygamy” movement turned into Animal Farm - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJ
What's the compelling state interest for not issuing licenses to same-sex couples, and why do you think it's necessary to achieve that interest?
qfingers - How the SSM “anti-polygamy” movement turned into Animal Farm - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJ
I don't there is a religion that condones "anything goes". Kind of defeats the purpose. So "condoning freedom" is not the goal of most any religion.
qfingers - How the SSM “anti-polygamy” movement turned into Animal Farm - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJ
Ever heard of a shotgun wedding? Consent doesn't come into that one, does it? How about arranged marriages? Again...no consent....

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Illinois Senate approves ride-sharing regulations

1 year, 1 month ago from Associated Press

The Senate passed a proposal that would place statewide rules on the unregulated industry that connects passengers and drivers through a smartphone app

SPRINGFIELD -- A plan in the Illinois legislature that's close to reaching the governor's desk for approval would devastate the ride-sharing industry in the state, companies including Uber, Lyft and Sidecar say.

The Senate passed a proposal with strong support Thursday that would place statewide rules on the unregulated industry that connects passengers and drivers through a smartphone app. Its burgeoning popularity in the Chicago area and across the country comes much to the chagrin of taxi company owners, who say the new innovation should play by the same rules as cabs.

The new rules would level the playing field and allow the competitors to survive, said Mara Georges, an attorney for the Illinois Transportation Trade Association, which represents taxi and chauffeur livery companies.

She also said the rules would help taxi companies keep their drivers "as opposed to having this tremendous movement ... to the ride-sharing companies."

The legislation sponsored by Democratic state Sen. Tony Munoz of Chicago would create two tiers of regulation.

All drivers would need to pass background checks and have commercial liability insurance of at least $350,000. Drivers working more than 36 hours in a two-week period would need to follow stricter rules, similar to taxis. Local municipalities could set rules for "surge pricing" -- which allows drivers to hike prices during high demand -- for rides dispatched through a smartphone app.

"The bill protects taxi special interests who are working to stifle competition and protect their monopoly," Uber wrote in a statement, adding that the proposal "damages consumer choice, safety, economic development, and the ability of municipalities to regulate transportation services."

Lyft and Sidecar representatives have made similar statements.

The plan passed the Senate as two pieces of legislation. The second still needs approval from the House, which voted 80-26 last month to pass the first ride-sharing regulation measure. A spokesman for Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn said the administration hasn't taken a position yet.

"There is widespread, substantive support for regulations of ride-sharing apps. No one's trying to put any of these apps out of business. We're just trying to make sure our constituents are safe," said Riverside Democratic state Rep. Michael Zalewski, who's sponsoring the legislation in the House.

The city of Chicago is still trying to pass its own ride-sharing ordinance.


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