Monday, Jan 26, 2015
Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Trending on the Journal

Recent Comments

CoolEdge - Police-fire pensions to go up in smoke? - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
during Iraqi Freedom (2003-2007) the death rate was 413/100,000, compared to 16/100,000 for the police. For Vietnam it was 2231/100,000. ... but they often get worse care than illegals.
CoolEdge - Police-fire pensions to go up in smoke? - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
All pensions should be funded in a balanced budget. But do you really want to compare a 40 hour week as a Quincy cop with a 24/7 tour of duty in Iraq? The fatality rate is about four times as high for the soldier fighting in Afghanistan (and that includes big city numbers), not to mention the PTSD or other injuries. So your raw number tidbits are a bit deceptive. Farming is almost twice as dangerous…
CoolEdge - Police-fire pensions to go up in smoke? - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
That's really the heart of it ... how do government officials have authority to negotiate promises (usually/often for political or monetary support in elections), that don't immediately collect the revenue to fund those promises/contracts? Budgets are supposed to balance, children can't be "taxed" (future obligations) without representation. I thought that was the idea of "PayGo",…
CoolEdge - Police-fire pensions to go up in smoke? - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
you're right I'm talking more of the other public unions than fire/police ... it may have been partly private unions busing people in to fight Walker in Wisconsin, but it was over the public union issue. That is the "solidarity" thing. Same with electing pro-union politicians at higher levels than mayor. Trumka has access to the White House, and treats non-union (non-communists) as the…
AYHSMB - Police-fire pensions to go up in smoke? - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
What the heck are you talking about, yesquy? How does collective bargaining come into play with your rant? You're talking about nepotism among a small group of local bozos. I'm talking about unsustainable costs that do not happen in the private sector. Show me a private sector company on the scale of a local FD of PD with the same benefits and retirement. Also, you must believe it's…

Most Popular

Police-fire pensions to go up in smoke?

Quincy School Board selects architects for new school buildings

JWCC giving test for Teacher aides

Rauner signs order aimed at helping veterans, minorities

The Patio restaurant could open as early as February 1

New rules help Illinois collect out-of-state sales taxes

Strawman: Celebrating A Hero... Video

Trainsmart with Gary joins the Quincy Family YMCA

Voter rights, crime victim rights amendments set for fall ballot so far

9 months, 2 weeks ago Doug Finke, State Capitol Bureau

The Illinois Senate approved the two amendments Thursday

From Doug Finke, State Capitol Bureau :
At least two proposed changes to the Illinois Constitution will appear on the Nov. 4 ballot, including one to prevent voter-suppression laws.
The Illinois Senate approved the two amendments Thursday. The House previously OK’d them, meaning they will be before voters in the fall. Gov. Pat Quinn does not have to sign them.
On a 52-0 vote, the Senate approved an amendment that is aimed squarely at preventing the state from enacting laws that Democrats have argued are intended to suppress voter participation by minorities, the poor and the elderly. Those laws are intended to cut into Democratic voter strength, they’ve said.
Specifically, the proposed amendment says “no person shall be denied the right to register to vote or to cast a ballot in an election based on race, color, ethnicity, status as a member of a language minority, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation or income.”
“We’ve heard the stories from around the nation of states implementing laws specifically to limit the right to vote,” said Sen. Kwame Raoul, D-Chicago. “This is definitely intended to discourage voter ID laws because of their disparate impact.”
Statistics have shown the poor, elderly and minority voters are less likely to have the photo IDs needed in some states in order to vote.
“In the county where I reside, we’ve had issues,” said Sen. Kyle McCarter, R-Lebanon. “If a (photo ID) is not available, we should make it available. I firmly believe we should have a voter ID law that does not discriminate.”
McCarter did not vote on the amendment.
However, Sen. Matt Murphy, R-Palatine, supported it.
“If we can send a message and make clear that no matter what your surname is, if you have earned that right to vote, nothing will be done to impede it,” he said. “You will not find a Republican who disputes that notion.”
Senators also voted 59-0 to put an improved crime victims’ rights amendment on the ballot. The state Constitution already has a Crime Victims’ Bill of Rights that was adopted in 1992.

Click Here to Read Full Article


From the Newsroom

Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 10 hours, 6 minutes ago

RT @Moira Fitzgerald ن: All @MMFlint 's films combined lifetime profit: $187,264,678 #AmericanSniper since 1/16/15 (including limited release): $247,637,000
nichols120 on Twitter

nichols120 12 hours, 17 minutes ago

QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 13 hours, 18 minutes ago

Lovelace back in court Monday - Appearance should be the last one before the trial begins in late March http://t.co/oL1QwijNIi
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 17 hours, 38 minutes ago

RT @City Journal: President Obama takes credit for growth stoked largely by red state policies. http://t.co/yQEqefJgin http://t.co/KX5BrwAG5h