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Snarky_2 - Feds indict ex-House Speaker Hastert for allegedly hiding payments to apparent blackmailer - Quincy,
A second "Victim" has surfaced. Is he/she angry the first guy got paid off and he/she did not? How many others are out there? Jerry Sandusky had many victims come out after the story became public. Bill Cosby knows how many silent victims get courage after the story becomes public. Voyeurism is second only to sports.
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I have thought long and hard about this, studied and analyzed all the data for the surrounding area, interviewed thousands without spending a dime and have come up with a great slogan for our identity. "Life is good"
vanillak - Crider’s ETA in question - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
It says Stefan crider 111 not steson crider
Expat62 - Feds indict ex-House Speaker Hastert for allegedly hiding payments to apparent blackmailer - Quincy,
Hoisted with one's own petard. It's part of the Patriot Act which Hastert voted for.
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Michael Flynn appeared on Newsmax TV yesterday. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t0M_1lWIlY8

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Madigan’s ‘millionaire amendment’ proposal earns mixed reaction

1 year, 2 months ago Tobias Wall, State Capitol Bureau

Proposed “millionaires amendment” garnered mostly negative responses from lawmakers

From Tobias Wall, State Capitol Bureau :
Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan's proposed “millionaires amendment” garnered mostly negative responses from local lawmakers.
The Chicago Democrat on Thursday proposed a constitutional amendment that would tack an additional 3 percent surcharge on individual incomes over $1 million. The revenue the tax would generate, estimated to be $1 billion, would be distributed to Illinois' ailing public schools.
Republicans in both the House and Senate are skeptical of the proposal. Rep. Raymond Poe, R-Springfield, wondered what would keep millionaires from moving away.
“If you're making a million dollars, you can afford to move away. I'd like to see some projections at the end of the day, are we really actually going to make money or lose money?” Poe said. “I'm afraid we'll get this mass exodus.”
That exodus, Poe said, could result in a net loss of income tax dollars compared to what the state would normally realize under the status quo.
However, data provided by Madigan's office shows that even with the surcharge in place, the tax liabilities on millionaires in two neighboring states — Iowa and Wisconsin — still would be higher than on those in Illinois.
Poe also said that while he understands the needs of struggling schools, he's skeptical as to whether Madigan's plan is the right way to address them.
Grow jobs instead
Sen. Sam McCann, R-Carlinville, said earmarking new revenues for education was what lawmakers had in mind when they created the Illinois Lottery, but today, less than 7 percent of education funding comes from the lottery.
Calling Madigan's proposal “a gimmick at best,” McCann said, “there's no doubt we need to grow our revenue in the state, but we need to grow our revenue the way that so many other states have been able to grow it, and that is by increasing the number of people working.”
He said that when more people are working, more revenue flows into the state without the need for a tax increase, including “selective taxes” on millionaires.
Rep. Rich Brauer, a Petersburg Republican, took a slightly different approach, saying the state needs to focus on belt-tightening instead of searching for more money.
“Until we control spending, no matter how much revenue we raise, we will never balance the budget,” he said. “We have to control our spending, and we haven't done that.”

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