Tuesday, May 26, 2015
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Recent Comments

CoolEdge - Updated NASA Data: Global Warming Not Causing Any Polar Ice Retreat - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJourna
30 years of cooling (to 1980 or so) then 30 years warming They use the data on the warming half of one cycle, and call it "long term". They need 50 cycles, not one half of one cycle ... dishonest arses. They know damn well they start at the end of a long cooling period, yet don't account for it, and usual only a straight line linear regression for their argument, which hides the last 18 years…
CoolEdge - Updated NASA Data: Global Warming Not Causing Any Polar Ice Retreat - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJourna
"The rest of Taylor’s article is just whitewash intended to distract readers from these facts." So these guys are mind readers, not scientists? They can read his intent? Or they are using personal attacks when they don't have facts on their side? I think the U of I boyz are the ones spinning here. Taylor notes this short time range ... readings from 1979 are not "long term" when it…
Expatriate - Updated NASA Data: Global Warming Not Causing Any Polar Ice Retreat - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJourna
Al Gore is an idiot. There's no denying that. For the record, I bet Taylor understands the data just fine. That's how he knows where to cherry-pick.
Expatriate - Updated NASA Data: Global Warming Not Causing Any Polar Ice Retreat - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJourna
For one, he's not explaining to the reader that there's a difference between polar ice cap extent and polar ice cap volume. People monitoring global warming are less concerned with polar ice extent than they are with the total amount of ice. Take a peek at the declining volume in the Arctic: "April 2015 volume was 26% below the maximum April ice volume in 1979 and 13% below the 1979-2014…
Givemeliberty - Illinois Senate passes marijuana decriminalization bill but plans changes - Quincy, IL News - Quincy
I think it'll come, its just going to take time and some education on the pro and anti side of the debate. People will soon see the sky will not fall.

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Economy, jobs among Illinois governor hopefuls' priorities

1 year, 4 months ago Associated Press

Illinois Gov. Quinn cites 'clash of values'

From Associated Press:

All four Republican candidates for Illinois governor said fixing the state's economic woes would be among their top priorities if they win — an issue they'll be trying to distinguish themselves on in a state that's home to one of the nation's highest unemployment rates and a multibillion-dollar backlog of overdue bills.

In response to a campaign questionnaire from The Associated Press, the four contenders — state Sens. Bill Brady and Kirk Dillard, state Treasurer Dan Rutherford and Winnetka businessman Bruce Rauner — cited the need to cut spending, lower taxes, get people back to work by creating a more business-friendly climate — and "all of the above." While offering only a few specifics, the four will no doubt be pressed on the issue in a series of upcoming debates leading up to the March 18 primary.

"Jobs. Jobs. And Jobs," wrote Rutherford, of Chenoa, a former vice president for ServiceMaster Co., in response to an AP question asking for each candidate's top three priorities if elected. "Illinois government finances are dire and our state is universally considered unfriendly to business. Building an environment that job creators are seeking and putting people back to work will help solve a lot of Illinois' financial and social ailments."

Those ailments include an unemployment rate of 8.7 percent as of November, the most recent date for which numbers are available. It was the third straight month that the rate dropped, but it was still above the national unemployment of 7 percent for the same month.

Lawmakers took steps last month to fix another massive fiscal problem, approving a plan supporters say will eliminate Illinois' $100 billion unfunded pension liability over 30 years. But the state isn't counting on any of those savings for at least another year — and it's possible the courts could find the new law unconstitutional and throw it out.

Meanwhile, a temporary income tax increase approved by Democrats in 2011 is set to be rolled back on Jan. 1, 2015. The Governor's Office of Management and Budget recently projected a loss of about $2 billion in revenue during the fiscal year that begins July 1 if that rollback occurs.

Brady, who has real estate development interests around his hometown of Bloomington, said the long-term solution to Illinois' problems is to "create an environment that fosters new investments and new jobs in the private sector."

"That environment includes eliminating needless government regulations, reducing the tax burden and working to further refine our workers compensation and tort systems," wrote the party's 2010 nominee. He said his second priority would make the "difficult decisions" to balance the budget without extending the temporary income tax hike.

"There is not an area of state government that can't do more with less," Brady said.

The candidates' answers didn't focus solely on the state's bleak economy.

Dillard, a lawyer from Hinsdale, called for reforming the budget and reducing taxes. But he also listed ethics reform in his top three, saying "pay-to-play" politics must end and noting that Illinois' widely publicized history of corruption also hurts the state's bottom line.

"Corruption is creating a negative for Illinois that affects our ability to attract and retain businesses to create jobs," he wrote.

Dillard said he would create an "Office of the Repealer," whose purpose would be to repeal and eliminate unnecessary laws, taxes, fees and rules.

Rauner, a wealthy venture capitalist from Winnetka and the only GOP candidate who has never held public office, said his goal was to "create a booming economy with more good paying jobs." But he also mentioned his push to establish term limits in Illinois — an effort he said is the only way to end corruption. He is leading a group that's trying to put a measure on the November ballot to limit lawmakers' terms to eight years, among other legislative changes.

"We need to drive results for taxpayers. Illinois has never spent more, but we have never received less in return," Rauner said.

A longtime supporter of charter schools, Rauner also listed "dramatically improve education" among his priorities.

In the Democratic primary, Gov. Pat Quinn faces Tio Hardiman, an anti-violence activist from Hillside. Quinn declined to participate in the AP's candidate questionnaires, but indicated in a year-end interview with the AP that he saw the economy playing a central role in the intensifying campaign, which he characterized as a "clash of values." He is pushing for a hike in the state's minimum wage, a proposal Rauner said he could support only along with other economic reforms, and which the other three GOP candidates oppose.

"I'm not going to let the clock get turned back by a bunch of folks who have views that I think are extreme and do not reflect the common good of Illinois," Quinn said. "We're not turning Illinois into Potterville. ... We believe in a Bedford Falls where you take care of your neighbor and you have community."

Hardiman said his top priority would be resolving the state's pension crisis, saying the current plan to cut the unfunded liability over 30 years is "ridiculous" because "nobody will be around in 30 years to be held accountable for another failed policy." He also said he wants to reduce violence statewide and better fund education.

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