Wednesday, Oct 1, 2014
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qfingers - Mayor Moore discusses Newcomb proposal - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
It's not tax abatement...it's a tax refund which is a financing tool. And there's lots more than what is listed on your link It's a rather long section of 65 ILCS 5/11-74 http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?Ac...
Givemeliberty - Iowa company pitches Newcomb development proposal - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
The pill Hobart is wanting the city to take would be easier to swallow, if they were bringing American Family, AT&T, Motorola, or something like it to fill up this building with 300-400 Jobs. Sadly though projects like the one I just described or the Newcome Lofts will only come to this area with help from the City or County (not saying the city should give in to all of Hobarts demands) because the…
UrKidsWillPay - Mayor Moore discusses Newcomb proposal - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
The TIF district does not include a Property Tax abatement. Those are features of the Enterprise Zone which this site is not a part of. Would like to know how we are going to force that one through against our rules.....not that I doubt they will do it. Take a look at the eligible TIF expenses and tell me where they are going to lie to us to classify 1.8 million of a 4 million project as TIF eligible.…
UrKidsWillPay - Quincy Police Blotter for September 30, 2014 - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Could be or it could be for a burnout. which could be defined as unsafe because you lack complete traction. Or it could be for accelerating too fast but not buring the tires and without going over the speed limit. or she could have exited a private drive like the bowling alley without properly yielding.
qfingers - Mayor Moore discusses Newcomb proposal - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Just remember that getting taxable property there doesn't bring in any extra $$ for the city. What it does is lower property taxes for the rest of us. Obviously more $$ back for more expensive properties (i.e. same % saved across the board). By the same token the TIF district raises our taxes until such time as the TIF expires. That's because some of the tax $$ are diverted to a special…

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Editorials & Opinion

REBEL MEDIA: FCC blinks, drops newsroom monitoring concept

7 months ago by Bob Gough

FCC Chairman said idea "overstepped the bounds..."

I was glad to finally see members from "traditional media" questioning this. Maybe that's what finally got the FCC to back off. 

From foxnews.com:

The Federal Communications Commission has announced that it was putting on hold a controversial study of American newsrooms, after complaints from Republican lawmakers and media groups that the project was too intrusive. 

FCC spokeswoman Shannon Gilson said Chairman Tom Wheeler agreed with critics that some of the study's proposed questions for reporters and news directors "overstepped the bounds of what is required." 

The agency announced that a proposed pilot study in South Carolina will now be shelved, at least until a "new study design" is finalized. But the agency made clear that this and any future studies will not involve interviews with "media owners, news directors or reporters." 

Commissioner Ajit Pai, who was one of the staunchest critics of the proposal, heralded the decision Friday as an acknowledgement that government-backed researchers would not be dispatched into newsrooms, as feared.   

"This study would have thrust the federal government into newsrooms across the country, somewhere it just doesn't belong," he said in a statement. "The Commission has now recognized that no study by the federal government, now or in the future, should involve asking questions to media owners, news directors, or reporters about their practices. This is an important victory for the First Amendment." 

He added: "And it would not have been possible without the American people making their voices heard. I will remain vigilant that any future initiatives not infringe on our constitutional freedoms." 

The Radio and Television News Directors Association took a more cautious view of the announcement. 

"RTDNA views this as an important admission by the FCC that questions regarding editorial policies and practices are off-limits to the government," Director Mike Cavender said in a statement. "We are eager to see the revised study to insure there aren't topics or questions that could be construed as a 'back door' attempt to gather the same type of information." 

Amid the controversy, Wheeler had already told lawmakers the commission had "no intention" of regulating reporters' speech. He also directed that the controversial questions be removed from the survey entirely. 

The initial proposal for the study called for looking into issues like "perceived station bias" and "perceived responsiveness to underserved populations." The proposed questions for the interviews with members of the media raised alarm bells, including questions about "news philosophy" and how much community input goes into story selection and whether reporters ever had "a story with critical information" rejected by management. 

Gilson said Friday that, "Any subsequent market studies conducted by the FCC, if determined necessary, will not seek participation from or include questions for media owners, news directors or reporters." 

However, she added: "Any suggestion that the FCC intends to regulate the speech of news media or plans to put monitors in America's newsrooms is false. The FCC looks forward to fulfilling its obligation to Congress to report on barriers to entry into the communications marketplace, and is currently revising its proposed study to achieve that goal." 


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