by Dave Overfelt
Thursday, Nov 27, 2014
Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
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Cardinalquincy - Quincy Police Blotter for November 27, 2014 - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
I have as much to give thanks for as the Native Americans (not Indians) did when the pilgrims (white man) egotistically sailed over and proceeded to make the natives dependent upon alcohol so as to instill complacency while they raped their women, proceeded to steal their land, and graciously move then unto reservations and profit off casinos. These white men whom stole the native's land, now…
Cardinalquincy - Quincy Police Blotter for November 27, 2014 - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Is it possible that law enforcement receive 'bonus kickbacks' for certain types of arrests or busts, not unlike monetary offerings and vacations given to doctors/psychiatrists by pharmaceuticals reps for pawning off drugs on patients. That type of unethical corruption couldn't really exist?
Cardinalquincy - Quincy Police Blotter for November 27, 2014 - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Soon Darren Wilson will be resigning. Which is likely in the best interest of his safety, not to mention, the respectful thing to do. He may wish to consider complete reconstructive surgery rendering him unrecognizeable ala Casey Anthony. Many targets will likely be painted upon him by remaining embittered prior protestors.
Cardinalquincy - Quincy Police Blotter for November 27, 2014 - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Has anyone seen the Michael Douglas film "Falling Down"? I always felt it sad that William Foster (Douglas) was shot by Martin Prendergrass (Robert Duvall), and not the other way around. All he did was draw a colored water pistol. Anyone could have been able to discern such. The over zealous authoritative ego had to bring him down so that he'd never get to see another of his daughter's…
qfingers - Jail Committee to draft ¼ per cent sales tax ballot resolution - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJour
The number required to do away with sales tax is an additional 15% on top of what we already pay. So it would be 22.75%. http://www.cato.org/publications/commentary/consi... And the universal rebate would make it progressive so it's really not too bad an idea if we can get rid of the IRS in…

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Editorials & Opinion

REBEL MEDIA: Heavy regulations put brakes on small business success

10 months ago by Dave Overfelt

While Washington, D.C. has developed a reputation for partisan politics, there are still some issues where consensus can be reached. Regulatory reform—which is a high priority for small-business owners like the members of the Missouri Retailers Association—is one of those issues that enjoys broad bipartisan appeal.

From my position as president of the Missouri Retailers Association, I have seen firsthand the effects of burdensome regulations on business and economic growth. The Office of Management and Budget says the number of new regulations costing business $100 million or more has increased by 60 percent since 2006.

Earlier in 2013 the professional services company BDO found that 97 percent of retailers say concern over regulations is a risk to their businesses. It ranks as the No. 2 risk they face after the general state of the economy. 

Regulations hit businesses like small retailers especially hard. We do not have the luxury of large staffs that large corporations can employ to ensure that our operations comply with new rules.  It is the job of the owner and maybe a few other employees to sift through the 175,000 pages of regulations that make up the 2013 Code of Federal Regulations (which is 21 percent longer than the Code issued in 2003). We do not have staffs of attorneys to dig through pages of dry regulatory language and then determine whether the “one-size-fits-all” rules actually apply to our businesses.

Sometimes the challenge of taking off from the store just to go apply for a new permit or fill out and file more paperwork is more trouble than it is worth. So we might not expand our retail line, open a second facility, hire a new employee, or enter a new line of business such as online retailing. The economy suffers.

Federal lawmakers and regulators could learn a lot about the pitfalls of over-regulation from small-business owners. If I could sit down and explain the retailer’s perspective to regulators, maybe those agencies would rethink their processes and many of the more onerous regulations. Any regulatory reform package should include an outlet for small-business owners to submit input and voice their concerns.

Too often it is extraordinarily difficult to find out what data or models were used to decide on new regulations. Regulatory reform must be made more transparent, and the science behind each regulation should be made available to the public. If the regulation will benefit the public, there should be no reason why the process should be done behind closed doors.

Has anyone in government questioned what it will actually cost a small business to meet each new regulation? Determining the cost should automatically be required for every new rule. Then we need a common-sense determination as to whether the cost is justified.

A transparent regulatory process that considers the input of the small-business community and uses scientific data and cost-benefit analyses is a good jumping-off point for regulatory reform. The U.S. Senate’s Committee on Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs—which has jurisdiction over the regulatory review process—could use these principles as a guideline to enact real reform. That would transform the daily life of a small-business owner.

It is my hope that the Committee on Homeland Security—and Missouri’s own Senator McCaskill who sits on this powerful committee—will champion the needs of small-business owners in the next legislative session. Missouri retailers are ready to jump start our economy, put people to work and grow our businesses.

Our elected officials, regardless of whether Democrat or Republican, frequently voice support for regulatory reform. President Barack Obama has promised regulatory reform in his State of the Union speech. This would be a great time for all of them to sit down together, forge a consensus, and deliver the goods.

 

Dave Overfelt is president of the Missouri Retailers Association.

http://blog.bdo.com/index.php/2013/05/23/regulations-are-among-the-top-risks-for-retailers/

From the Newsroom

Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 15 hours, 14 minutes ago

RT @John Sexton: Yesterday, Ezra Klein insinuated Wilson was lying. Vox's top story. Thousands spread it. Later Klein acknowledged he was wrong. Oops!
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 15 hours, 29 minutes ago

RT @Ben Shapiro: So a black man robs a store, tries to grab a cop's gun, charges the cop, and gets shot -- and our lesson is that America is racist.
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 15 hours, 30 minutes ago

@MHopfWHIG There's never a problem with ham unless you run out.
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 17 hours, 32 minutes ago

RT @Missourinet: AG Holder wants to look at something else in Ferguson http://t.co/kfinJ92Ne3