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Loverofblues - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
35 years for teaching.
cih8920 - Despite record yields for farmers, Titan\'s Taylor sees down year for tires in 2015 - Quincy, IL New
Titan tractor tires have a very poor track record in the last few years and it is evidently starting to show up in Titans pocketbook.
RUHEARINGVOICES - Illinois Early Voting starts: Cook County ballot box tries to cast GOP votes for Democrats - Quincy,
...and in Adams County I was required to show a photo ID to vote early even though the statute was amended effective July 1st to eliminate that requirement for 2014 only. http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp... middle of para (b).
CoolEdge - Despite record yields for farmers, Titan\'s Taylor sees down year for tires in 2015 - Quincy, IL New
370-400 bushels per acre? National average is supposed to be a record at 172, but are they making 370 even in the irrigated bottom ground? We had lotsa rain and a lot of double ears filled out ... but the average is only 10 bushels higher. Of course most of those extra bushels are probably sold at $3, and they are looking at under $3 next year. Most farmers already made a lot of purchases with…
CoolEdge - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Ellington is concrete, doesn't seem "temporary". If the roof is an issue, put some pretty metal gabled roofs over the thing. HVAC is the issue? ... how can it be more for new units than a new building with new HVAC? They could even add a new building behind the old(er) building. The best sales point to me is in attracting industry to the area, which wants to attract individuals, who want good…

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Illinois Senate committee votes to send minimum-wage hike to the floor

2 years, 5 months ago By Jayette Bolinski, Illinois Statehouse News

A plan to raise Illinois’ minimum wage to more than $10 per hour passed a Senate committee Wednesday

 

 
SPRINGFIELD — A plan to raise Illinois’ minimum wage to more than $10 per hour passed a Senate committee Wednesday, despite protests from business owners who said it will harm their ability to stay afloat in a tough economy. Proponents of Senate Bill 1565 say a minimum-wage hike will put more money in workers’ pockets, thus enabling them to spend more money at Illinois businesses.
 
Illinois’ minimum wage now stands at $8.25. The measure would increase the wage by 50 cents a year until it matches the the inflation-adjusted equivalent of minimum wage in 1968, which was $1.60 per hour. The phased-in hikes would bring Illinois’ minimum wage to $10.55 in 2015, after which yearly cost-of-living increases would occur.
 
The Senate Executive Committee approved the proposal 9-5. The bill, sponsored by state Sen. Kimberly Lightford, D-Maywood, now goes to the Senate floor for a vote.
 
If the measure is enacted, Illinois could have the highest minimum wage in the country, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Washington state has the highest minimum wage, at $9.04 per hour.
 
Illinois last increased its minimum wage in 2010.

Backers of the increase, including minimum-wage workers and a small business owner from Chicago, said they barely can support themselves and their families on the current minimum wage.

Lathan Cole, 29, of Springfield, said he has a bachelor’s degree in psychology and worked with disabled people at a nonprofit, until he was laid off two years ago during the state’s budget crisis. He now works in a diner for $8.25 an hour. 
 
“I can’t pay my car payment, so my grandfather helps me with that. Sometimes I have to ask my grandmother for gas money,” he said. “I can’t afford to go out to eat. That’s a leisure thing, and that’s not my qualm. It’s that I can’t even meet my bare minimum. It’s really hard.”
 
Business owners, however, said the hike will cripple their ability to continue operating.
 
Doug Knight, owner of Knight’s Action Park, a water and recreation park here, hires about 200 teenagers and young adults to work at his business. He said he was forced to scale back his operating hours following the last minimum wage hike in 2010 because he could not stay profitable and had to cut costs.
 
“If my expenses go up, I have to raise my prices,” Knight, a third-generation businessman, said, noting that his business is tricky because families shop wisely when it comes to vacations, and he has regional competition in Missouri, Wisconsin and Indiana.
 
“If I can’t be profitable, I can’t grow my business,” Knight said.
 
State Sen. Kirk Dillard, R-Hinsdale, who said he has supported minimum wage hikes in the past, voted against the measure, saying, “The timing here is terrible,” economically.
 

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