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Righty1 - DNC Chair Can\'t Describe difference between Democrat and Socialist - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJourna
There is no difference! They both enjoy taking money from people who work for it and giving it to the leeches. They also have no problem killing the unborn and selling their body parts. They are both selfish and lazy. Neither has any redeeming value in life. In the old days they would have all starved to death do to their failure to plant or harvest food for the winter.
eaglebeaky - Man jumps off Bayview Bridge - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Actually, Hydro, you don't have "every right" to know who the deceased gentleman is (unless you're his next of kin). You merely paid your taxes; that one (insignificant) fact does not give you the "right" to know any darned thing about the man. (Using your logic, the identities and the home addresses of crime victims would be announced every night on the 10 o'clock news, simply to…
pjohnf - California college asks students to choose from SIX genders when filling out admissions forms - Quin
Somebody needs to tell UC Irvine that contrary to what they want to believe, there are only two genders in this world, you're either a male or a female and nature and God determine what you are not how you define yourself.
WarCry - Man jumps off Bayview Bridge - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
"...my tax dollar paid to scoop up his body so I have every right to know who it is." What an incredibly selfish, arrogant, and morbid thing to post. You don't have a RIGHT to know, you just WANT to know and you're making up BS excuses over it. You think you have a 'right" to know because you pay taxes. Guess what, there are a LOT of things like this you'll never know.…
pjohnf - Fuel on the Fire - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
I just shake my head when I look at Lurch Kerry's and Obama's naivety when dealing with Iran. Do these two actually believe Iran, as Iran's leaders shout death to America? The Iranian nuke deal is a farce and leaves the middle east and Israel in grave danger and Obama and Kerry don't see it. The Iran deal will be another of Obama's failures and it will have dire consequences…

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Illinois Lawmakers begin defining parameters of pension fix

2 years, 4 months ago By Benjamin Yount, Illinois Watchdog

A final pension reform law is a long way off, and roadblocks still exist, but Illinois’ path to controlling its $130 billion pension debt is becoming clearer

 

SPRINGFIELD — A final pension reform law is a long way off, and roadblocks still exist, but Illinois’ path to controlling its $130 billion pension debt is becoming clearer.

The Illinois House last week approved measures to cap the salary — $113,000 — on which a pension can be based, and to steadily raise the retirement age — to 67 for some public employees.

More important, according to state Rep. Elaine Nekritz, D-Northbrooke, lawmakers are finally showing their cards in regard to what they will and will not support.

“This process is highlighting and narrowing the kinds of things we can consider as part of a comprehensive package,” Nekritz said Thursday.

Illinois lawmakers have long talked about the need for pension reform, but until this spring rank and file legislators have taken few votes on the issue.

Nekritz said the approach “where leaders come together with a solution” and hand it off to lawmakers has produced nothing.

“It really is important that we try and do something different, and find out what members will support,” Nekritz said.

Lawmakers have supported limits on the amount public workers will earn with their pensions and generally support the idea that public employees will have to pay more for their retirement benefits.

But the Illinois House has voted down a plan that would freeze or eliminate cost-of-living adjustments for pensioners as well as proposals that would have had teachers, university workers, prison guards and state troopers pay 4 percent more toward their retirements.

Each plan has gotten its own vote over the past few weeks. Powerful Democratic House Speaker Mike Madigan has said he orchestrated the votes to “educate” lawmakers on the complexity of pension reform.

House Republican Leader Tom Cross has been critical of the process.

This is legislating by multiple choice,” Cross announced on the House floor Thursday.

Cross’ Republican caucus boycotted many of the pension votes out of anger over “politics,” the GOP leader has said.

“Many of these people have never been pinned down on these issues before,” said University of Illinois at Springfield political science professor Chris Mooney. “That’s why you see so many votes.”

Mooney said lawmakers are being tested.

“If you won’t support a 3 percent pension increase, what about 2 percent? What about COLA’s?”

Nekritz said the goal is a “comprehensive package” on pension reform, and not a hodge-podge of ideas.

The comprehensive plan Nekritz and Cross — along with state Sen. Dan Biss, D-Evanston — are shepherding through the Capitol passed a statehouse committee Thursday. It could come before the House any day.

But while the House is acting on pension reform, the Illinois Senate is moving ahead with a number of different yet sweeping proposals.

A proposal from Senate President John Cullerton, D-Chicago, giving public employees a choice between higher pension contributions or lower benefit levels, passed a Senate panel Wednesday.

Cullerton insists the choice component of his plan is the only way Illinois can reform its five pension systems and not run afoul of constitutional protections.

John Cameron is legislative director for the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees. Any pension reform that lacks union blessings would be unconstitutional, he says.

“We believe that the best approach to get to constitutionality is by negotiating,.” Cameron said. “Taking another approach than imposing reductions.”

But lawmakers in both the House and the Senate do not appear willing to bargain over pension reform.

Mooney thinks pension reform will have to be hammered out — one piece and one vote at a time.

“Maybe the bargaining lawmakers did in the backroom for years is finally being done out in public.”


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