Saturday, Sep 20, 2014
Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Trending on the Journal

Recent Comments

WarCry - QPD nabs 66 in latest STEP detail - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Being nude in your car isn't illegal*. As long as you had your seat belt on, didn't appear to be intoxicated, and had no other evidence of illegality, they would have waved you on your way. They would have TALKED about you for a very long time, but they wouldn't have stopped you. *There is a bit of a double-standard in this, as women could be cited for public nudity. This is because…
WarCry - QPD nabs 66 in latest STEP detail - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Please, keep posting. You're painting a clearer and clearer picture that shows how very little you actually know about the subject. It's easier for people to know what weight to give your comments when you show how truly ignorant of reality you are.
WarCry - QPD nabs 66 in latest STEP detail - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Do a search and find every single story of a cop convicted of abuse of power, brutality, racism, whatever transgressions you want. Find as many as you can. All of them. Post links if you want. Then take that number and figure it as a percentage of 700,000. As of 2009 (the last year I can relatively quickly put my hands on information), there were just over 706,000 sworn law enforcement officers…
MountainMan - QPD nabs 66 in latest STEP detail - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Easier said than done, I think it was the Mises Institute who did a study years back and found the average American breaks the law 3 times a day......in the freest country in the world.
WarCry - QPD nabs 66 in latest STEP detail - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Legal until it's illegal wasn't the ignorant part. Comparing seat belt traffic details to slavery is ignorant. I would expect a rational person to understand that. I guess that's where my expectations missed the mark.

Most Popular

Quincy's Long John Silver's closed

QPD nabs 66 in latest STEP detail

Quincy man arrested for selling crack cocaine

Quincy Park Board selects Frericks as executive director

Where $1 million is going at Quincy Regional Airport

Adams Co. Divorces for Sept. 19

The cost of maintaining homes where no one lives

Illinois still employs 173 'improper' state hires

Hannibal, Mo. native set to march in The 57th inaugural Presidential Parade

1 year, 8 months ago by Paige Traeder

Originally from Hannibal, Missouri, Tech. Sgt. Joel Wealer is a French hornist with Concert Band, the largest musical ensemble of the U.S. Air Force Band

The U.S. Air Force Band and Honor Guard are proud to represent the Air Force in the 2013 inaugural parade. The 99-piece band and 80-person Honor Guard flight will march along the 1.5-mile route that begins at 4th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue and goes past the White House on January 21st in Washington, D.C

Originally from Hannibal, Mo., Tech. Sgt. Joel Wealer began his Air Force career in 2002. Wealer is a French hornist with Concert Band, the largest musical ensemble of the U.S. Air Force Band. He earned a Bachelor of Music in horn performance from Missouri State and a Master of Music degree in horn performance from the University of Michigan.

The U.S. Air Force Band and Honor Guard are stationed at Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling, Washington, D.C. Their presentations instill patriotism, deliver positive messages about the Air Force and America, and demonstrate Air Force excellence to billions of people worldwide.

Since its formation, the Air Force Band has marched in 15 inaugural parades (there was no parade in 1945, and the 1985 parade was canceled due to weather). The band began in 1941 when the newly-formed U.S. Army Air Corps activated 59 bands into operation. It was initially called The Bolling Field “Band” and consisted of five men—a saxophone quartet and a bandleader. Over the next 71 years, the Band expanded its size and mission to include six primary performing ensembles and a global mission. The band’s uplifting programs instill patriotism, deliver positive messages about the Air Force and America, and demonstrate Air Force excellence to billions of listeners on television, radio, Internet and at more than 1,600 live events each year.

The primary mission of the United States Air Force Honor Guard is to render military honors to members of the Air Force, past and present, and their families during funeral services at Arlington National Cemetery. In addition to this distinguished duty, the Honor Guard also conducts military ceremonies at the White House, Pentagon and national memorials representing the Air Force in presidential, joint service, Air Force and public ceremonies. The beginnings of the Honor Guard’s rich history date back to May 1948 when it was originally activated within Bolling Field’s 1100th Security Squadron. It remained primarily a function of that squadron until Jan. 1, 1972, when it became a separate unit.



From the Newsroom

Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 7 hours, 50 minutes ago

@DOB23 He put the leadoff batter on...again. #badbaseball
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 8 hours, 7 minutes ago

RT @cbinflux: ULULULULULULULULULULUL!!!11!! AL JAZEERA SUES AL GORE. Things are heating up. http://t.co/5OwK26qFMT
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 14 hours, 27 minutes ago

RT @DCComics: Happy Birthday to the amazingly awesome @therealadamwest. We're doing the Bat-tusi in your honor.
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 14 hours, 27 minutes ago

RT @xmasape: "Can I kiss you?" http://t.co/iGJ6IKgzCA