Tuesday, Oct 21, 2014
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CoolEdge - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Perhaps UKWP is trying to equate military service with "on the teat" teaching jobs. Of course there are many big differences, especially for military that are deployed, which is part of the job. There are indeed many public school teachers that see their unionized, teaching monopoly, "part time" job as a public service that demands the same respect as our military. Not many retire with PTSD, or…
db1998 - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
how do i get a sign for my yard?
qfingers - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
And you're making the opposite mistake....saying that each thing, when added together, becomes a total justification. That's not how you justify expenditures. You have to make the case for EACH item in it's own right. And you do that compared to what it would cost to fix it in place...assuming you do have to fix it...which apparently we don't...because it hasn't been done.…
GrayHairedMan - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
But if everything is already under construction, there is nothing that can be done. I have been involved with a lot of bid projects and there are always cost overruns. In fact, the contractors live for the over runs as it is how they make extra money. The words will be "change orders" and everyone will just have to bend over. I stick with my original post above, this project, if passed, will go…
Givemeliberty - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
If this was a responsible persons car it would of not got this bad, they would of took care of these issues as they came along, rather than waiting to dump 3 grand in at one time. But just for the sake of argument It sounds like this car has about 200,000 miles on it and its probably worth about $800, because cars don't hold their value especially when they are ragged out. So yea this is a no…

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Can Twitter help better identify foodborne illness cases?

2 months ago From Illinois Ag Connection

A new analysis shows that new technology might improve foodborne illness surveillance

An estimated 55 million to 105 million people in the United States suffer from foodborne illnesses each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), resulting in costs of $2-$4 billion annually.

What if Twitter could be used to track those cases and more quickly identify the source of the problem?

A new analysis by a researcher at Washington University in St. Louis' Brown School and colleagues shows that new technology might better allow health departments to engage with the public to improve foodborne illness surveillance.

The results are published in the Aug. 15 issue of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report from the CDC.

Jenine Harris, PhD, assistant professor, examined data collected by the Chicago Department of Health and its program FoodBorne Chicago. In 10 months, staff members responded to 270 tweets about possible foodborne illness cases and provided links to a complaint form.

People submitted a total of 193 complaints of possible foodborne illness through FoodBorne Chicago, leading to 133 restaurants inspected. Inspection reports indicated 21 (15.8 percent) restaurants failed inspection, and 33 (24.8 percent) passed with conditions indicating critical or serious violations.

"Collaboration between public health professionals and the public via social media might improve foodborne illness surveillance and response," Harris said.

"There isn't a lot of research yet, but my guess is that Chicago is not unique when it comes to its citizens tweeting about health," she said. "I'm sure there are people tweeting about food poisoning in large cities and small towns across the country and around the world."

What do we know about foodborne illness?

Foodborne illness is a serious and underreported public health problem with high health and financial costs. Local health departments nationwide license and inspect restaurants to prevent foodborne illness and track and respond to foodborne illness complaints. Emerging evidence on the effectiveness of social media for foodborne illness surveillance suggests mining tweets and restaurant reviews might aid in identifying and taking timely action on sources of foodborne illness that otherwise would go unreported.

What are this study's important findings?

Staff used a new open-source surveillance and response tool to identify and respond to tweets about foodborne illness in Chicago. Over a 10-month period, the tool identified 133 Chicago-area restaurants, which subsequently underwent inspection. Of these, 21 (15.8 percent) failed inspection, and 33 (24.8 percent) passed with conditions.

What is the advantage for local health departments of using Twitter to find cases of foodborne illness more quickly?

Whenever food poisoning can be reported and investigated quickly, it provides health departments an opportunity to prevent additional foodborne illnesses. Surveillance via Twitter is a great way to do this because people tend to use it in real time.

What are the implications of this study for public health practice?

New technology applied to widely used social media platforms might allow health departments to engage the public to improve foodborne illness surveillance.


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