Sunday, Jul 5, 2015
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Recent Comments

Expatriate - How the SSM “anti-polygamy” movement turned into Animal Farm - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJ
Sorry for not being clear. I'm not saying that i know that it's something passed along genetically. I have no idea. I'm just responding to the hypothetical question and saying that both evolution and genetic homosexuality can be true at the same time. While I believe you are correct (they haven't found the gay genetics), studies suggest that there is a genetic component.
Expatriate - How the SSM “anti-polygamy” movement turned into Animal Farm - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJ
Sure, that's always a valid point. But once you start picking winners and losers by only issuing licenses and status to one group, what's the compelling state interest in excluding the other?
CoolEdge - How the SSM “anti-polygamy” movement turned into Animal Farm - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJ
Prostitution, murder, gambling, age of consent ... which of those are not morality laws? Ima thinkin ... all laws are based in morality. Freedoms exist within a social, then religious, then legal (the order may be wrong, and the level of powers that enforce them) ... code of ethics and morality.
CoolEdge - How the SSM “anti-polygamy” movement turned into Animal Farm - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJ
Thousands of years of history, with rules developed to make a society function better ... but you have it figured out they were wrong. "zero bearing on my life as I'm neither gay nor a polygamist." yeah right ... giving entitlements to any "marriages" you don't perceive as influencing your life should be allowed. You know the original colonies demanded their residents attend church…
WarCry - How the SSM “anti-polygamy” movement turned into Animal Farm - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJ
Morality cannot be legislated. Period. When you start making morality laws, then freedom doesn't exist any more. While some might laugh at using the example, look at the movie DEMOLITION MAN. One of the running gags in that movie is when someone says a "bad word", Big-Brother-Is-Always-Listening computer buzzes and issues a fine for a "violation of the verbal moralities code". If that's…

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Summer has been good to cornfields

10 months, 3 weeks ago Associated Press

Genetic modifications also help increase yield

From Associated Press:

A mild summer across much of the nation’s heartland has provided optimum growing conditions for the nation’s corn and soybean crops. Pair that with high-yield seeds and other new farming technologies, and the U.S. is looking at busting records come harvest time.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture already has predicted a record soybean crop of 3.8 billion bushels. And the corn crop, it said in July, would be large but not bigger than last year’s record of 13.9 billion bushels. However, many market analysts and some farmers expect the USDA to revise expectations upward in a report based on field surveys that’s due out Tuesday.

“Conditions look just fantastic across most of the country,” Texas A&M University grain marketing economist Mark Welch said.

In a typical growing season, at least some corn-growing states would have experienced drought or other production problems. But the 18 states that grow 91 percent of the nation’s corn have experienced nearly ideal conditions this year, as adequate rain fell when plants emerged and cooler summer temperatures minimized heat stress.

That’s the case in Illinois, one of the nation’s top corn and soybean states.

“Illinois has largely been dealt to date pretty close to a royal flush on weather, and I’m sure that the yields are going to be very high here,” said Scott Irwin, a University of Illinois professor of agricultural and consumer economics.

The expected large harvest has driven corn and soybean prices significantly lower, but it isn’t expected to make much of a short-time difference in consumer food prices. However, since the grains are staples in livestock feed, lower prices could eventually lead to a decline in the cost of beef, pork, chicken and milk.

“Eventually, the economics will feed through, but I wouldn’t expect much relief in 2015 yet. It just takes time to go through the systems,” Irwin said.

Weather doesn’t deserve all the credit for the amount of grain farmers are getting from each acre this year.

Agriculture companies have developed genetic characteristics in seeds that allow plants to be packed more densely per acre and arm them with resistance to drought, disease and pests. In addition, larger planters and tractors equipped with GPS programs can run at night if needed, helping farmers adjust planting when weather delays field work.

“When conditions are right we have the ability to get in and get that crop established so much more quickly than we could in the past ...” Welch said. “We’re just creating an environment that when the weather cooperates, we’re capturing more of the potential and the possibilities genetically that are within that corn plant.”

During the lifetime of the average U.S. farmer, who’s 58, corn yields have more than tripled from a national average of 44 bushels per acre in the 1950s to nearly 150 bushels per acre in recent years.

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