Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015
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Recent Comments

xplorer37 - Flynn, Mellon each file for 18th Seat - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Mellon quote must be mentioned elsewhere. Nor any mention of a LaHood relative working in Schock's office, but I'll make note of it as a FYI. Family seems to have a lot of members at the trough. According to legistorm.com & congressional-staff.insidegov.com that LaHood pulled down $39,375.00 from taxpayers in last 3 months of 2014 working for Schock. Another LaHood is Regional Deputy…
HuhWhy - Quincy Mayor, Police & Fire Chiefs disagree over proposed budget cuts - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJour
Your questions were answered in detail at last nights budget hearing before the mayor and alderman. Chief Copley stated 2012, 2013 and 2014 very specific statistics that showed crime is on the increase even though you are not "aware". Chief Henning also answered what the increase in response times would be with the elimination of Station 6 and he stated it would make the residents there at a…
Stupid_Dems - WGEM no longer on Direct TV - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
No big loss! Like the Whig!
UrKidsWillPay - Quincy Mayor, Police & Fire Chiefs disagree over proposed budget cuts - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJour
I think you mean increases response time.
qfingers - Flynn, Mellon each file for 18th Seat - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Did I miss something? I don't see a quote from Mellon in the article above.

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Summer has been good to cornfields

8 months, 1 week ago Associated Press

Genetic modifications also help increase yield

From Associated Press:

A mild summer across much of the nation’s heartland has provided optimum growing conditions for the nation’s corn and soybean crops. Pair that with high-yield seeds and other new farming technologies, and the U.S. is looking at busting records come harvest time.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture already has predicted a record soybean crop of 3.8 billion bushels. And the corn crop, it said in July, would be large but not bigger than last year’s record of 13.9 billion bushels. However, many market analysts and some farmers expect the USDA to revise expectations upward in a report based on field surveys that’s due out Tuesday.

“Conditions look just fantastic across most of the country,” Texas A&M University grain marketing economist Mark Welch said.

In a typical growing season, at least some corn-growing states would have experienced drought or other production problems. But the 18 states that grow 91 percent of the nation’s corn have experienced nearly ideal conditions this year, as adequate rain fell when plants emerged and cooler summer temperatures minimized heat stress.

That’s the case in Illinois, one of the nation’s top corn and soybean states.

“Illinois has largely been dealt to date pretty close to a royal flush on weather, and I’m sure that the yields are going to be very high here,” said Scott Irwin, a University of Illinois professor of agricultural and consumer economics.

The expected large harvest has driven corn and soybean prices significantly lower, but it isn’t expected to make much of a short-time difference in consumer food prices. However, since the grains are staples in livestock feed, lower prices could eventually lead to a decline in the cost of beef, pork, chicken and milk.

“Eventually, the economics will feed through, but I wouldn’t expect much relief in 2015 yet. It just takes time to go through the systems,” Irwin said.

Weather doesn’t deserve all the credit for the amount of grain farmers are getting from each acre this year.

Agriculture companies have developed genetic characteristics in seeds that allow plants to be packed more densely per acre and arm them with resistance to drought, disease and pests. In addition, larger planters and tractors equipped with GPS programs can run at night if needed, helping farmers adjust planting when weather delays field work.

“When conditions are right we have the ability to get in and get that crop established so much more quickly than we could in the past ...” Welch said. “We’re just creating an environment that when the weather cooperates, we’re capturing more of the potential and the possibilities genetically that are within that corn plant.”

During the lifetime of the average U.S. farmer, who’s 58, corn yields have more than tripled from a national average of 44 bushels per acre in the 1950s to nearly 150 bushels per acre in recent years.

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