Sunday, Mar 1, 2015
Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Trending on the Journal

Recent Comments

GuyFawkes10 - All aboard? State cuts could mean fewer Amtrak trains - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Quit serving food. http://www.the-american-interest.com/2012/08/03/a... Maybe vending machines or privatize it.
GuyFawkes10 - Obama to ban bullets by executive action, threatens top-selling AR-15 rifle - Quincy, IL News - Quin
Are you daft? He may or may not support this? The whole point of the article and many others is that he, Obama, is signing a executive order to do this. Proposing a reclassification is one thing but signing an executive order is another. You covering for him is almost laughable if it were not for the erosion of our rights by this man and administration.
LeroyTirebiter - Obama to ban bullets by executive action, threatens top-selling AR-15 rifle - Quincy, IL News - Quin
The BATF is doing this. President Obama may or may not support this, but he has not issued an executive order to do this, as far as I know.
QuincyGuy - All aboard? State cuts could mean fewer Amtrak trains - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Raise the ticket prices. If it is important to those who need it and use it, they will pay for it. Get corporations involved with advertising, etc. to help defray some expenses. The government can't continue to carry the load because WE ARE THE MONEY THE GOVERNMENT SPENDS.
GuyFawkes10 - Obama to ban bullets by executive action, threatens top-selling AR-15 rifle - Quincy, IL News - Quin
Take O out of it, Whose executive order is it?

Most Popular

City starting to look at budget cuts

Adams Co Divorces for Feb 23

Obama to ban bullets by executive action, threatens top-selling AR-15 rifle

Republican Primary election in Quincy today

Schock used taxpayer and campaign funds for private planes, entertainment expenses

QFD at Madison School Wednesday

C-SC to host American Mathematics competition

Blessing Health System to co-sponsor Bridge the Gap race

Aging Illinois bridges hinder soybean harvest

6 months, 3 weeks ago Associated Press

Weight limits are increasing farming cost

From Associated Press:

A no-frills concrete bridge on the edge of Stockland, Illinois, represents just the kind of headache the nation's soybean farmers hope a multimillion-dollar campaign and a little creative thinking will cure.

The 50-feet concrete span and hundreds like it in soybean-growing states can't handle the weight of fully loaded grain trucks that'll be bringing an expected record harvest to grain elevators this fall. That means those who use the often small, obscure bridges will have to make more trips and spend more money.
 
Hauling soybeans to Stockland Grain Co. from the west means crossing the Stockland bridge. It's restricted to 29 tons or 58,000 pounds; a fully loaded grain trucks weighs 80,000 pounds.

"Basically, it's probably doubling the freight (cost)," Stockland Grain owner Sonny Metzinger said from his business about 100 miles south of Chicago.

Since farmers' profits are dropping this year alongside crop prices, bridge-infrastructure needs have come into sharper focus. Most soybeans wind up on a rail car or barge to reach their ultimate destination, but just about all of them leave the farm in trucks that roll over small bridges.

"This matters a lot all of the sudden," said Scott Irwin, a professor of agricultural marketing at the University of Illinois.

Soybeans are one of the country's largest and most valuable crops -- $41.8 billion in 2013 -- and are grown in about 30 states for animal feed, food additives and other uses. That money is of particular importance in rural counties in states such as Iowa and Illinois, the two largest producers. But those counties have small, often dwindling populations and the bridges are lightly used outside of hauling crops to market, which makes them a tough sell to state and local policymakers.

National and state soybean trade groups are spending millions -- $1.5 million in Illinois over three years, for example -- to make their case and present solutions beyond asking government agencies in charge of the bridges for money that they often don't have.

"The reality is we don't have the funding available to upgrade every single mile of that infrastructure and every single one of those bridges," said Mike Steenhoek, executive director of the Soy Transportation Coalition, a national soybean group based in Iowa that's working on the initiative.

The trade groups believe a bridge's importance shouldn't be measured by how many vehicles use it but by the value of the product they carry. Even at Friday's depressed price of less than $11 a bushel, a full truckload of 900 bushels of soybeans would sell for close to $9,900.

But, according to Irwin, cutting the weight a farmer's truck can carry by 25 percent per load might mean spending an extra $1,300 on fuel per 1,000 acres of crop.

The Illinois Soybean Association is working to pick a handful of bridges in each county to focus attention and resources on and, it hopes, present creative potential solutions, according to Scott Sigman, who works on transportation issues for the association.

Click Here to Read Full Article


From the Newsroom

QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 1 hour, 54 minutes ago

Hawks Fall to Truman In GLVC Tournament First Round - 18-0 second half run by Truman spells defeat for the Hawks http://t.co/uLUkQvzDQy
QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 2 hours, 44 minutes ago

Lady Hawks Get Revenge on Pumas in GLVC Tournament - Late defense keys the win http://t.co/57WCqOTJMF
QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 8 hours, 50 minutes ago

Women's Basketball Ends Regular Season with 72-50 Victory over Avila http://t.co/2c8GN0BaQ8
QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 10 hours, 54 minutes ago

All aboard? State cuts could mean fewer Amtrak trains - Could this affect Quincy? http://t.co/7CpGyuvJ32