Tuesday, Oct 21, 2014
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db1998 - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
how do i get a sign for my yard?
qfingers - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
And you're making the opposite mistake....saying that each thing, when added together, becomes a total justification. That's not how you justify expenditures. You have to make the case for EACH item in it's own right. And you do that compared to what it would cost to fix it in place...assuming you do have to fix it...which apparently we don't...because it hasn't been done.…
GrayHairedMan - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
But if everything is already under construction, there is nothing that can be done. I have been involved with a lot of bid projects and there are always cost overruns. In fact, the contractors live for the over runs as it is how they make extra money. The words will be "change orders" and everyone will just have to bend over. I stick with my original post above, this project, if passed, will go…
Givemeliberty - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
If this was a responsible persons car it would of not got this bad, they would of took care of these issues as they came along, rather than waiting to dump 3 grand in at one time. But just for the sake of argument It sounds like this car has about 200,000 miles on it and its probably worth about $800, because cars don't hold their value especially when they are ragged out. So yea this is a no…
qfingers - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
I've seen a couple of "studies" that supposedly try to show facilities matter. Totally unconvincing. Do you have a reference for something that shows the school building really matters? I can believe that facilities impact teachers more than students. Maybe if they maintained the buildings they wouldn't be so bad. And the ratings you quote are based on performance....not facilities.…

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Aging Illinois bridges hinder soybean harvest

2 months, 1 week ago Associated Press

Weight limits are increasing farming cost

From Associated Press:

A no-frills concrete bridge on the edge of Stockland, Illinois, represents just the kind of headache the nation's soybean farmers hope a multimillion-dollar campaign and a little creative thinking will cure.

The 50-feet concrete span and hundreds like it in soybean-growing states can't handle the weight of fully loaded grain trucks that'll be bringing an expected record harvest to grain elevators this fall. That means those who use the often small, obscure bridges will have to make more trips and spend more money.
 
Hauling soybeans to Stockland Grain Co. from the west means crossing the Stockland bridge. It's restricted to 29 tons or 58,000 pounds; a fully loaded grain trucks weighs 80,000 pounds.

"Basically, it's probably doubling the freight (cost)," Stockland Grain owner Sonny Metzinger said from his business about 100 miles south of Chicago.

Since farmers' profits are dropping this year alongside crop prices, bridge-infrastructure needs have come into sharper focus. Most soybeans wind up on a rail car or barge to reach their ultimate destination, but just about all of them leave the farm in trucks that roll over small bridges.

"This matters a lot all of the sudden," said Scott Irwin, a professor of agricultural marketing at the University of Illinois.

Soybeans are one of the country's largest and most valuable crops -- $41.8 billion in 2013 -- and are grown in about 30 states for animal feed, food additives and other uses. That money is of particular importance in rural counties in states such as Iowa and Illinois, the two largest producers. But those counties have small, often dwindling populations and the bridges are lightly used outside of hauling crops to market, which makes them a tough sell to state and local policymakers.

National and state soybean trade groups are spending millions -- $1.5 million in Illinois over three years, for example -- to make their case and present solutions beyond asking government agencies in charge of the bridges for money that they often don't have.

"The reality is we don't have the funding available to upgrade every single mile of that infrastructure and every single one of those bridges," said Mike Steenhoek, executive director of the Soy Transportation Coalition, a national soybean group based in Iowa that's working on the initiative.

The trade groups believe a bridge's importance shouldn't be measured by how many vehicles use it but by the value of the product they carry. Even at Friday's depressed price of less than $11 a bushel, a full truckload of 900 bushels of soybeans would sell for close to $9,900.

But, according to Irwin, cutting the weight a farmer's truck can carry by 25 percent per load might mean spending an extra $1,300 on fuel per 1,000 acres of crop.

The Illinois Soybean Association is working to pick a handful of bridges in each county to focus attention and resources on and, it hopes, present creative potential solutions, according to Scott Sigman, who works on transportation issues for the association.

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