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UrKidsWillPay - QPD nabs 66 in latest STEP detail - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
"Traffic law enforcement regularly identifies those who have perpetrated—or who intend to commit—serious criminal acts. Four of the September 11 terrorists were issued speeding citations just before that infamous day,1 and those 19 terrorists had obtained a total of 34 driver’s licenses and identity cards.2 Since its inception in 1998, 3M’s annual Looking Beyond the License Plate awards program has…
qfingers - Where $1 million is going at Quincy Regional Airport - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
You can read about the new design standards here: http://www.faa.gov/airports/eastern/airports_news... The SW taxiway, for example, has a 135 degree angle to the runway making for very poor visibly of the runway. All the others are 90 degrees…
UrKidsWillPay - QPD nabs 66 in latest STEP detail - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
"What do Timothy McVeigh, Ted Bundy, David "Son of Sam" Berkowitz, and 9/11 ring-leader Mohammed Atta have in common? They're all murderers, yes, but another curious detail uniting them is that they were all also brought to police attention by "routine" traffic violations." "The consequences of not issuing tickets were shown in a recent study of traffic violations in New York City. From 2001…
UrKidsWillPay - QPD nabs 66 in latest STEP detail - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
I'm sure he would rather the police not have caught this guy either. http://azdailysun.com/news/local/crime-and-courts...
UrKidsWillPay - QPD nabs 66 in latest STEP detail - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Migrane would prefer they not catch him in this fashion. They should just track him down like they do on TV....great detective work following all the clues and getting it all done within the hour..............the facts are that a lot of criminals are caught by simply coming into contact with police for a seemingly inconsequential issue.

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USDA seeks partnerships to protect soil, water

3 months, 3 weeks ago from Associated Press

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is teaming with businesses, nonprofits and others on a five-year, $2.4 billion program that will fund locally designed soil and water conservation projects nationwide, Secretary Tom Vilsack said.

Authorized by the new farm law enacted earlier this year, the Regional Conservation Partnership Program is intended to involve the private sector more directly in planning and funding environmental protection initiatives tied to agriculture. Officials provided details of the program to The Associated Press ahead of an announcement scheduled for Tuesday.

"It's a new approach to conservation that is really going to encourage people to think in very innovative and creative ways," Vilsack said.

He described the projects to be funded as "clean water start-up operations" that will benefit communities and watersheds, a departure from the department's more traditional approach of focusing on individual operators adopting practices such as no-till cultivation or planting buffer strips to prevent runoff into streams.

Universities, local and tribal governments, companies and sporting groups are among those eligible to devise plans and seek grants.

"This program is a recognition that a coordinated and comprehensive effort is more effective than the USDA operating on its own and Ducks Unlimited operating on its own and the Kellogg Foundation operating on its own," Vilsack said.

In addition to protecting the environment, the projects will bolster the rural economy by supporting tourism and outdoor recreation jobs while avoiding pollution that would cost more to clean up, he said.

USDA will spend $1.2 billion - including $400 million the first year - and raise an equal amount from participants. Successful applications will include offers of cash, labor or other contributions, as well as plans for achieving measurable solutions and using new approaches, said Jason Weller, chief of the Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Vilsack was announcing the program in Michigan, home state of Senate Agriculture Committee Chairwoman Debbie Stabenow, primary writer of the farm bill with Rep. Frank Lucas of Oklahoma. A news conference was scheduled in Bay City near Lake Huron's Saginaw Bay, where nutrient runoff from croplands causes algae blooms that degrade water quality.

Stabenow said she expected the area to generate several funding proposals.

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation, established by the cereal pioneer, is working with The Nature Conservancy on a project designed to reduce runoff in the Saginaw Bay watershed, said Diane Holdorf, the foundation's chief sustainability officer. Kellogg, based in Battle Creek, buys wheat for its cereals from farms in the area.

The program establishes three pots of money for grants. Thirty-five percent of total funding will be divided among "critical" areas including the Great Lakes, the Chesapeake Bay watershed, the Columbia, Colorado and Mississippi river basins, the Longleaf Pine Range, prairie grasslands and the California Bay Delta.

Additionally, 40 percent will go to regional or multi-state projects selected on a competitive basis and 25 percent to state-level projects.

The California Rice Commission plans to seek funding of initiatives to expand water bird habitat in flooded Central Valley rice fields, said Paul Buttner, manager of environmental affairs. Rice farms are an indispensable waterfowl refuge because most of the original wetlands have been developed, he said.

Working with the USDA and other partners, the rice commission has developed practices that can make fields more hospitable for birds such as draining them more gradually ahead of planting season and building nesting islands, Buttner said. The new program could attract more participants, he said.

The New Mexico Association of Conservation Districts will develop proposals for combating invasive plants that suck too much water from the ground and ranching practices that could slow the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer, Executive Director Debbie Hughes said.


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Where $1 million is going at Quincy Regional Airport http://t.co/Y8GprrcUSQ
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