Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015
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Recent Comments

xplorer37 - Flynn, Mellon each file for 18th Seat - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Mellon quote must be mentioned elsewhere. Nor any mention of a LaHood relative working in Schock's office, but I'll make note of it as a FYI. Family seems to have a lot of members at the trough. According to legistorm.com & congressional-staff.insidegov.com that LaHood pulled down $39,375.00 from taxpayers in last 3 months of 2014 working for Schock. Another LaHood is Regional Deputy…
HuhWhy - Quincy Mayor, Police & Fire Chiefs disagree over proposed budget cuts - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJour
Your questions were answered in detail at last nights budget hearing before the mayor and alderman. Chief Copley stated 2012, 2013 and 2014 very specific statistics that showed crime is on the increase even though you are not "aware". Chief Henning also answered what the increase in response times would be with the elimination of Station 6 and he stated it would make the residents there at a…
Stupid_Dems - WGEM no longer on Direct TV - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
No big loss! Like the Whig!
UrKidsWillPay - Quincy Mayor, Police & Fire Chiefs disagree over proposed budget cuts - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJour
I think you mean increases response time.
qfingers - Flynn, Mellon each file for 18th Seat - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Did I miss something? I don't see a quote from Mellon in the article above.

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USDA seeks partnerships to protect soil, water

10 months, 3 weeks ago from Associated Press

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is teaming with businesses, nonprofits and others on a five-year, $2.4 billion program that will fund locally designed soil and water conservation projects nationwide, Secretary Tom Vilsack said.

Authorized by the new farm law enacted earlier this year, the Regional Conservation Partnership Program is intended to involve the private sector more directly in planning and funding environmental protection initiatives tied to agriculture. Officials provided details of the program to The Associated Press ahead of an announcement scheduled for Tuesday.

"It's a new approach to conservation that is really going to encourage people to think in very innovative and creative ways," Vilsack said.

He described the projects to be funded as "clean water start-up operations" that will benefit communities and watersheds, a departure from the department's more traditional approach of focusing on individual operators adopting practices such as no-till cultivation or planting buffer strips to prevent runoff into streams.

Universities, local and tribal governments, companies and sporting groups are among those eligible to devise plans and seek grants.

"This program is a recognition that a coordinated and comprehensive effort is more effective than the USDA operating on its own and Ducks Unlimited operating on its own and the Kellogg Foundation operating on its own," Vilsack said.

In addition to protecting the environment, the projects will bolster the rural economy by supporting tourism and outdoor recreation jobs while avoiding pollution that would cost more to clean up, he said.

USDA will spend $1.2 billion - including $400 million the first year - and raise an equal amount from participants. Successful applications will include offers of cash, labor or other contributions, as well as plans for achieving measurable solutions and using new approaches, said Jason Weller, chief of the Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Vilsack was announcing the program in Michigan, home state of Senate Agriculture Committee Chairwoman Debbie Stabenow, primary writer of the farm bill with Rep. Frank Lucas of Oklahoma. A news conference was scheduled in Bay City near Lake Huron's Saginaw Bay, where nutrient runoff from croplands causes algae blooms that degrade water quality.

Stabenow said she expected the area to generate several funding proposals.

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation, established by the cereal pioneer, is working with The Nature Conservancy on a project designed to reduce runoff in the Saginaw Bay watershed, said Diane Holdorf, the foundation's chief sustainability officer. Kellogg, based in Battle Creek, buys wheat for its cereals from farms in the area.

The program establishes three pots of money for grants. Thirty-five percent of total funding will be divided among "critical" areas including the Great Lakes, the Chesapeake Bay watershed, the Columbia, Colorado and Mississippi river basins, the Longleaf Pine Range, prairie grasslands and the California Bay Delta.

Additionally, 40 percent will go to regional or multi-state projects selected on a competitive basis and 25 percent to state-level projects.

The California Rice Commission plans to seek funding of initiatives to expand water bird habitat in flooded Central Valley rice fields, said Paul Buttner, manager of environmental affairs. Rice farms are an indispensable waterfowl refuge because most of the original wetlands have been developed, he said.

Working with the USDA and other partners, the rice commission has developed practices that can make fields more hospitable for birds such as draining them more gradually ahead of planting season and building nesting islands, Buttner said. The new program could attract more participants, he said.

The New Mexico Association of Conservation Districts will develop proposals for combating invasive plants that suck too much water from the ground and ranching practices that could slow the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer, Executive Director Debbie Hughes said.


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