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Recent Comments

Loverofblues - Updated NASA Data: Global Warming Not Causing Any Polar Ice Retreat - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJourna
Heat wave in the southern hemi-sphere. 118 in India sounds warm?
CoolEdge - Updated NASA Data: Global Warming Not Causing Any Polar Ice Retreat - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJourna
In those ICCC conferences, one old retired scientist was saying if you give him a couple variables he can draw an elephant from the data, give him three and he can make its tail wag. Or something like that. The point is models are useless when a "scientist" gets to choose the data points and the preferred subject (tree rings in one area, certain ice cores, etc.). Even more insane when they don't…
Expatriate - Updated NASA Data: Global Warming Not Causing Any Polar Ice Retreat - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJourna
Your claim that there has been no warming for 18 years is absolutely false. It's a common misconception among those denying global warming and its based on an over-reliance on surface air temperatures and requires you to totally ignore the total heat content of the Earth. When you account for the heat content of the oceans, ice, atmosphere, etc., you see that the heat content of the planet has…
Expatriate - Updated NASA Data: Global Warming Not Causing Any Polar Ice Retreat - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJourna
If we're going to get into the muck of alleging that scientists have been corrupted by donors providing them with funding, to have a shred of intellectual honesty, you must concede the biases of Mr. Taylor as a Heartland employee.
Givemeliberty - Missouri\'s corrections system has a drug problem - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
The crimes you listed all have victims, that's why they are and should continue to remain punishable. The guy smokin pot isn't hurting anyone, so no victim combined with proven failed policy, just like prohibition and just like gun control is my logic.

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USDA seeks partnerships to protect soil, water

1 year ago from Associated Press

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is teaming with businesses, nonprofits and others on a five-year, $2.4 billion program that will fund locally designed soil and water conservation projects nationwide, Secretary Tom Vilsack said.

Authorized by the new farm law enacted earlier this year, the Regional Conservation Partnership Program is intended to involve the private sector more directly in planning and funding environmental protection initiatives tied to agriculture. Officials provided details of the program to The Associated Press ahead of an announcement scheduled for Tuesday.

"It's a new approach to conservation that is really going to encourage people to think in very innovative and creative ways," Vilsack said.

He described the projects to be funded as "clean water start-up operations" that will benefit communities and watersheds, a departure from the department's more traditional approach of focusing on individual operators adopting practices such as no-till cultivation or planting buffer strips to prevent runoff into streams.

Universities, local and tribal governments, companies and sporting groups are among those eligible to devise plans and seek grants.

"This program is a recognition that a coordinated and comprehensive effort is more effective than the USDA operating on its own and Ducks Unlimited operating on its own and the Kellogg Foundation operating on its own," Vilsack said.

In addition to protecting the environment, the projects will bolster the rural economy by supporting tourism and outdoor recreation jobs while avoiding pollution that would cost more to clean up, he said.

USDA will spend $1.2 billion - including $400 million the first year - and raise an equal amount from participants. Successful applications will include offers of cash, labor or other contributions, as well as plans for achieving measurable solutions and using new approaches, said Jason Weller, chief of the Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Vilsack was announcing the program in Michigan, home state of Senate Agriculture Committee Chairwoman Debbie Stabenow, primary writer of the farm bill with Rep. Frank Lucas of Oklahoma. A news conference was scheduled in Bay City near Lake Huron's Saginaw Bay, where nutrient runoff from croplands causes algae blooms that degrade water quality.

Stabenow said she expected the area to generate several funding proposals.

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation, established by the cereal pioneer, is working with The Nature Conservancy on a project designed to reduce runoff in the Saginaw Bay watershed, said Diane Holdorf, the foundation's chief sustainability officer. Kellogg, based in Battle Creek, buys wheat for its cereals from farms in the area.

The program establishes three pots of money for grants. Thirty-five percent of total funding will be divided among "critical" areas including the Great Lakes, the Chesapeake Bay watershed, the Columbia, Colorado and Mississippi river basins, the Longleaf Pine Range, prairie grasslands and the California Bay Delta.

Additionally, 40 percent will go to regional or multi-state projects selected on a competitive basis and 25 percent to state-level projects.

The California Rice Commission plans to seek funding of initiatives to expand water bird habitat in flooded Central Valley rice fields, said Paul Buttner, manager of environmental affairs. Rice farms are an indispensable waterfowl refuge because most of the original wetlands have been developed, he said.

Working with the USDA and other partners, the rice commission has developed practices that can make fields more hospitable for birds such as draining them more gradually ahead of planting season and building nesting islands, Buttner said. The new program could attract more participants, he said.

The New Mexico Association of Conservation Districts will develop proposals for combating invasive plants that suck too much water from the ground and ranching practices that could slow the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer, Executive Director Debbie Hughes said.


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