Sunday, Aug 2, 2015
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Recent Comments

WarCry - QPD Blotter for July 30, 2015 - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Shocking how many people don't seem to understand the concept of sarcasm.
CoolEdge - Man killed Montana good Samaritans because daughter \'laughed\' at him, say cops - Quincy, IL News -
Many people just read the headlines. That's why I said "Up Front". The more significant point is not that this was a Native American family, but that he is another Mexican we brought in to work while we have high unemployment (and record low labor participation rate). Despite many being good people, many have no respect for our laws. We need to push some of the welfare people into these green…
Snarky_2 - Man jumps off Bayview Bridge - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
In fact they have listed the names of the young people in the obituary section of the paper, they just don't put heroine or shotgun, or rope as the cause of death or list it specifically as a suicide... Word of mouth and social media is how we know who what when where and why... old people have killed themselves forever, we just don't list the cause of death out of deference to the family.
QuincyGuy - Man killed Montana good Samaritans because daughter \'laughed\' at him, say cops - Quincy, IL News -
Let's ask President Trump what he would do. Is it just me or are there more Mexicans involved in killings now than there were? Yes, I know there are more pouring out of the ant hill south of our border, but it seems that we are getting more and more of their scum.
Snarky_2 - Man jumps off Bayview Bridge - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
They used to publish in the newspaper (in an out of the way area) the results of a Coroner's Inquest Have not seen that done here in quite a while. I was also told years ago that if you use a Public entity, IE ambulance, fire department and/or police it is not confidential information but that does not mean the Media has an obligation to report..... An inquest is an inquiry held in public…

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USDA seeks partnerships to protect soil, water

1 year, 2 months ago from Associated Press

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is teaming with businesses, nonprofits and others on a five-year, $2.4 billion program that will fund locally designed soil and water conservation projects nationwide, Secretary Tom Vilsack said.

Authorized by the new farm law enacted earlier this year, the Regional Conservation Partnership Program is intended to involve the private sector more directly in planning and funding environmental protection initiatives tied to agriculture. Officials provided details of the program to The Associated Press ahead of an announcement scheduled for Tuesday.

"It's a new approach to conservation that is really going to encourage people to think in very innovative and creative ways," Vilsack said.

He described the projects to be funded as "clean water start-up operations" that will benefit communities and watersheds, a departure from the department's more traditional approach of focusing on individual operators adopting practices such as no-till cultivation or planting buffer strips to prevent runoff into streams.

Universities, local and tribal governments, companies and sporting groups are among those eligible to devise plans and seek grants.

"This program is a recognition that a coordinated and comprehensive effort is more effective than the USDA operating on its own and Ducks Unlimited operating on its own and the Kellogg Foundation operating on its own," Vilsack said.

In addition to protecting the environment, the projects will bolster the rural economy by supporting tourism and outdoor recreation jobs while avoiding pollution that would cost more to clean up, he said.

USDA will spend $1.2 billion - including $400 million the first year - and raise an equal amount from participants. Successful applications will include offers of cash, labor or other contributions, as well as plans for achieving measurable solutions and using new approaches, said Jason Weller, chief of the Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Vilsack was announcing the program in Michigan, home state of Senate Agriculture Committee Chairwoman Debbie Stabenow, primary writer of the farm bill with Rep. Frank Lucas of Oklahoma. A news conference was scheduled in Bay City near Lake Huron's Saginaw Bay, where nutrient runoff from croplands causes algae blooms that degrade water quality.

Stabenow said she expected the area to generate several funding proposals.

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation, established by the cereal pioneer, is working with The Nature Conservancy on a project designed to reduce runoff in the Saginaw Bay watershed, said Diane Holdorf, the foundation's chief sustainability officer. Kellogg, based in Battle Creek, buys wheat for its cereals from farms in the area.

The program establishes three pots of money for grants. Thirty-five percent of total funding will be divided among "critical" areas including the Great Lakes, the Chesapeake Bay watershed, the Columbia, Colorado and Mississippi river basins, the Longleaf Pine Range, prairie grasslands and the California Bay Delta.

Additionally, 40 percent will go to regional or multi-state projects selected on a competitive basis and 25 percent to state-level projects.

The California Rice Commission plans to seek funding of initiatives to expand water bird habitat in flooded Central Valley rice fields, said Paul Buttner, manager of environmental affairs. Rice farms are an indispensable waterfowl refuge because most of the original wetlands have been developed, he said.

Working with the USDA and other partners, the rice commission has developed practices that can make fields more hospitable for birds such as draining them more gradually ahead of planting season and building nesting islands, Buttner said. The new program could attract more participants, he said.

The New Mexico Association of Conservation Districts will develop proposals for combating invasive plants that suck too much water from the ground and ranching practices that could slow the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer, Executive Director Debbie Hughes said.


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