Thursday, Jul 31, 2014
Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Trending on the Journal

Recent Comments

Stupid_Dems - City of Quincy to spend $342,000 on road salt - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Difference is transportation cost
luanjo3 - Fast food workers vow civil disobedience - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
There is all kinds of assistance already out there for the single mothers that you speak of, and they take full advantage of it. I've heard of single mothers getting so much financial aid to go back to school that they have money left over. Then they drop out because hey, they didn't have to pay for it. Single moms who get so much EITC on their tax returns that they can go out and get…
pjohnf - White House Pressed to Keep RFS, Biodiesel Industries Strong - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Franken and Senator just seem to me to be oxymoronic, they just don't go together.
gizzard93 - City of Quincy to spend $342,000 on road salt - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
sounds like double talk to me.
SeenTheLight1 - City of Quincy to spend $342,000 on road salt - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Never heard of such a thing. Cities and counties along with townships submit their request, then CMS uses that total for their RFP. If a supplier cannot meet that total then I would guess some could be left off the RFP total, but have never heard of that. The other comment states " bids range from $70 to $140 per ton" so why is Quincy paying $95 per ton? Still I have never heard of CMS cutting off…

Most Popular

Soup restaurant to open in new Broadway strip mall

Second break-in suspect caught Updated

New Illinois law bans employers from conducting background checks before interviews

Multiple reports of burglaries on Quincy's north side

Schoenakase on WTAD's Mary Griffith Show

Instead of improving business climate, Durbin vilifies Illinois business looking to leave

Back pay, OT pushes Illinois government’s ‘$100,000 club’ to 7,800 members

Quincy School Board votes to raise lunch prices

Protecting us hungry

2 months, 1 week ago Mary Soukup, Editor, Drovers CattleNetwork

Technology's role in agriculture continues to be debated

From Mary Soukup, Editor, Drovers CattleNetwork :

The world population is projected to reach 9 billion by 2050. That’s not disputed. Feeding all those hungry people will require more food produced using less land and less water. That’s a fact. In fact, over the next 50 years, farmers and ranchers will have to produce more food than has been produced in the past 10,000 years combined. That’s a lot to wrap one’s mind around.

But it’s the “how do we do that” issue that was the focus of the 2014 National Institute for Animal Agriculture annual conference in early May. According to a recently released white paper from the conference, reliance on the “Precautionary Principle” could prevent the adoption of new technologies to help agriculture meet growing food demand based perceived concerns and subjective biases rather than fact and science.

The precautionary principle is a decision-making principle designed to initiate preventative action as a response to scientific uncertainty, shift the burden of proof to the proponents of a potentially harmful activity, explore alternative means to achieve the same goal, and involve stakeholders in the decision-making process. In practical terms, it’s a political tool used to block innovation.

The white paper identifies an often-quoted definition of the principle developed by a group of environmentalists in the 1990s that said “When an activity raises threats of harm to human health or the environment, precautionary measures should be taken even if some cause-and-effect relationships are not established scientifically…It must also involve an examination of the full range of alternatives, including no action.” Or according to one speaker at the conference, when the principle is “selectively applied to politically disfavored technologies and conduct,” it is used as a “barrier to technological development and economic growth.”

What does this have to do with animal agriculture? Well-funded opposition is increasingly working to influence legislation and regulation, and undermine consumer confidence in food safety for genetically engineered ingredients, according to the white paper. The paper highlighted a nearly two-decades’ old effort to obtain approval for a genetically modified salmon that has been held up by activists and their attorneys based on economic and social concerns, not science. Further, the result is causing some technology companies to move overseas to places like China and Brazil.

Click Here to Read Full Article


From the Newsroom

Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 2 hours, 5 minutes ago

@keithcleer HAHAHA!
QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 2 hours, 47 minutes ago

Sheriff reveals attempted jailbreak - Three men tried to escape Sunday http://t.co/zh0b95aGYR
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 3 hours, 10 minutes ago

@KeeneMLB Me too.
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 3 hours, 13 minutes ago

aaaand...On cue, Cards fans bemoaning giving up Ramsey for Masterson. #goodlordpeople