Friday, Mar 6, 2015
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pjohnf - Maybe Hillary Clinton Should Retire Her White House Dreams - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
The Hillary, Obama in a dress or pant suit.
qfingers - 7 emails reveal signs of racial bias among Ferguson officials, DOJ says - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJo
No it's not...read the definition of the word...I guess we need to fire all the comedians too, eh? \ \http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/racism?s=t
CoolEdge - 7 emails reveal signs of racial bias among Ferguson officials, DOJ says - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJo
yeah, dem's would probably like him to run, then pull the racist crap in the general election. But I don't think he is ready for "prime time". He's already flubbed up a few times, as far as giving non-PC answers, like his recent flub on gays. He may have been partly correct, but he probably can't get past an answer like that, as far as a presidential run goes.
Expatriate - 7 emails reveal signs of racial bias among Ferguson officials, DOJ says - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJo
Just a sampling... Joke 1 implies that no black man can hold a job for more than 4 years. Joke 3 was an image depicting a black man as a chimp. Joke 4 implies all children of black women are criminals and society would thank black women for having abortions. That's not blatant racism? What the hell, in your mind, is blatant racism?
1950Brutus - 7 emails reveal signs of racial bias among Ferguson officials, DOJ says - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJo
I can't wait to hear the slurs when/if Ben Carson decides to run. All the previous stuff will probably pale in comparison.

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Protecting us hungry

9 months, 1 week ago Mary Soukup, Editor, Drovers CattleNetwork

Technology's role in agriculture continues to be debated

From Mary Soukup, Editor, Drovers CattleNetwork :

The world population is projected to reach 9 billion by 2050. That’s not disputed. Feeding all those hungry people will require more food produced using less land and less water. That’s a fact. In fact, over the next 50 years, farmers and ranchers will have to produce more food than has been produced in the past 10,000 years combined. That’s a lot to wrap one’s mind around.

But it’s the “how do we do that” issue that was the focus of the 2014 National Institute for Animal Agriculture annual conference in early May. According to a recently released white paper from the conference, reliance on the “Precautionary Principle” could prevent the adoption of new technologies to help agriculture meet growing food demand based perceived concerns and subjective biases rather than fact and science.

The precautionary principle is a decision-making principle designed to initiate preventative action as a response to scientific uncertainty, shift the burden of proof to the proponents of a potentially harmful activity, explore alternative means to achieve the same goal, and involve stakeholders in the decision-making process. In practical terms, it’s a political tool used to block innovation.

The white paper identifies an often-quoted definition of the principle developed by a group of environmentalists in the 1990s that said “When an activity raises threats of harm to human health or the environment, precautionary measures should be taken even if some cause-and-effect relationships are not established scientifically…It must also involve an examination of the full range of alternatives, including no action.” Or according to one speaker at the conference, when the principle is “selectively applied to politically disfavored technologies and conduct,” it is used as a “barrier to technological development and economic growth.”

What does this have to do with animal agriculture? Well-funded opposition is increasingly working to influence legislation and regulation, and undermine consumer confidence in food safety for genetically engineered ingredients, according to the white paper. The paper highlighted a nearly two-decades’ old effort to obtain approval for a genetically modified salmon that has been held up by activists and their attorneys based on economic and social concerns, not science. Further, the result is causing some technology companies to move overseas to places like China and Brazil.

Click Here to Read Full Article


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