Thursday, Oct 23, 2014
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WarCry - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
A responsible person doesn't have his neighbors telling him he can't spend money on needed work, leaving him to scrape by with doing the bare minimums until the car is on its last legs.
WarCry - Quincy School Board pledges to reinvest savings from new buildings - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal
You are well-respected by most commentors on this site - including myself - but on this particular issue, you just seem bound and determined to ignore what's actually being presented to you because you don't like it. In this very article that you're commenting on, it says: It is anticipated that repairs to existing facilities, such as QHS, Early Childhood and Quincy Junior High,…
QuincyJournal - Quincy School Board pledges to reinvest savings from new buildings - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal
They wouldn't be on new buildings. QHS, QJHS and Early Childhood. BG
Daniel Oliver - Kirk says some illegal immigrant children being sent to Illinois - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.c
Where are the parents of these kid? does this have something to do with the issue regarding the undocumented immigrants in military http://builtusa.com/undocumented-immigrants-in-mi...
qfingers - Quincy School Board pledges to reinvest savings from new buildings - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal
Why would we have ANY life safety projects on new buildings????????? Even over 20 years that's pretty hard to imagine to the tune of $2M per year. Can I put some more question marks behind that?????????

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Protecting us hungry

5 months ago Mary Soukup, Editor, Drovers CattleNetwork

Technology's role in agriculture continues to be debated

From Mary Soukup, Editor, Drovers CattleNetwork :

The world population is projected to reach 9 billion by 2050. That’s not disputed. Feeding all those hungry people will require more food produced using less land and less water. That’s a fact. In fact, over the next 50 years, farmers and ranchers will have to produce more food than has been produced in the past 10,000 years combined. That’s a lot to wrap one’s mind around.

But it’s the “how do we do that” issue that was the focus of the 2014 National Institute for Animal Agriculture annual conference in early May. According to a recently released white paper from the conference, reliance on the “Precautionary Principle” could prevent the adoption of new technologies to help agriculture meet growing food demand based perceived concerns and subjective biases rather than fact and science.

The precautionary principle is a decision-making principle designed to initiate preventative action as a response to scientific uncertainty, shift the burden of proof to the proponents of a potentially harmful activity, explore alternative means to achieve the same goal, and involve stakeholders in the decision-making process. In practical terms, it’s a political tool used to block innovation.

The white paper identifies an often-quoted definition of the principle developed by a group of environmentalists in the 1990s that said “When an activity raises threats of harm to human health or the environment, precautionary measures should be taken even if some cause-and-effect relationships are not established scientifically…It must also involve an examination of the full range of alternatives, including no action.” Or according to one speaker at the conference, when the principle is “selectively applied to politically disfavored technologies and conduct,” it is used as a “barrier to technological development and economic growth.”

What does this have to do with animal agriculture? Well-funded opposition is increasingly working to influence legislation and regulation, and undermine consumer confidence in food safety for genetically engineered ingredients, according to the white paper. The paper highlighted a nearly two-decades’ old effort to obtain approval for a genetically modified salmon that has been held up by activists and their attorneys based on economic and social concerns, not science. Further, the result is causing some technology companies to move overseas to places like China and Brazil.

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