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UrKidsWillPay - REBEL MEDIA: Everybody\'s doing it - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
But the implications aren't just for Chancelors of Universities. This would have to legally apply to every government job which would certainly impact applications and it will also surely result in some hires being second guessed and place a cloud over the incoming person selected. The public is not going to be privy to the reasons candidates are not selected and yet eventually some candidate…
AdamsCountyGuy - Winter Storm Linus May Change Game Day Plans - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Please don't tell me you are using the winter storm names like the Weather Channel. That's just silly. Especially when its a peanuts characters name.
XBgCty - Strawman: #Hashtag You\'re It... - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Biden says more stupid stuff then ANY other person alive. Yet everyone shrugs it off as "Joe being Joe". He's so stupid it is expected. he is the "Funny Uncle" that says and does stupid things and it is OK becuase it is expected. They call them Bidenisms, Google it
CordellWalker - Strawman: #Hashtag You\'re It... - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
And besides - Obama is a baller. What does McCain to stay fit? Matlock marathon?
QuincyJournal - Winter Storm Linus May Change Game Day Plans - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
But don't let a little snow stop your Super Bowl plans!

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Protecting us hungry

8 months, 1 week ago Mary Soukup, Editor, Drovers CattleNetwork

Technology's role in agriculture continues to be debated

From Mary Soukup, Editor, Drovers CattleNetwork :

The world population is projected to reach 9 billion by 2050. That’s not disputed. Feeding all those hungry people will require more food produced using less land and less water. That’s a fact. In fact, over the next 50 years, farmers and ranchers will have to produce more food than has been produced in the past 10,000 years combined. That’s a lot to wrap one’s mind around.

But it’s the “how do we do that” issue that was the focus of the 2014 National Institute for Animal Agriculture annual conference in early May. According to a recently released white paper from the conference, reliance on the “Precautionary Principle” could prevent the adoption of new technologies to help agriculture meet growing food demand based perceived concerns and subjective biases rather than fact and science.

The precautionary principle is a decision-making principle designed to initiate preventative action as a response to scientific uncertainty, shift the burden of proof to the proponents of a potentially harmful activity, explore alternative means to achieve the same goal, and involve stakeholders in the decision-making process. In practical terms, it’s a political tool used to block innovation.

The white paper identifies an often-quoted definition of the principle developed by a group of environmentalists in the 1990s that said “When an activity raises threats of harm to human health or the environment, precautionary measures should be taken even if some cause-and-effect relationships are not established scientifically…It must also involve an examination of the full range of alternatives, including no action.” Or according to one speaker at the conference, when the principle is “selectively applied to politically disfavored technologies and conduct,” it is used as a “barrier to technological development and economic growth.”

What does this have to do with animal agriculture? Well-funded opposition is increasingly working to influence legislation and regulation, and undermine consumer confidence in food safety for genetically engineered ingredients, according to the white paper. The paper highlighted a nearly two-decades’ old effort to obtain approval for a genetically modified salmon that has been held up by activists and their attorneys based on economic and social concerns, not science. Further, the result is causing some technology companies to move overseas to places like China and Brazil.

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Bob Gough 13 hours, 34 minutes ago

@Amychristine67 Cool. Just wanted to make sure I didn't miss something.
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Bob Gough 13 hours, 41 minutes ago

@Amychristine67 @BruceRauner Where was this?
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Bob Gough 13 hours, 53 minutes ago

I'm sure the folks in Burlington love hearing Kurt Warner call Phoenix his hometown.
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Winter Storm Linus May Change Game Day Plans - Whatever you may be doing as the storm rolls in, take your time and... http://t.co/kw1hswU0Py