Friday, Aug 28, 2015
Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com

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CordellWalker - Durham man shot by police - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Bubble buster here - your 1st amendment rights do not apply to the comment section of a privately owned news web site. You can't tell "fire" in a movie theater and cry 1st amendment either.
ONCEMORE1 - Durham man shot by police - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
No Best Buy either---not worth the trouble. Don't know about likkah stores......
1950Brutus - Durham man shot by police - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
I think all Canton has is a C.
eaglebeaky - Legionnaires’ disease outbreak at IL Vets Home - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Hopefully IDPH will be able to get a handle on this situation very quickly; the only hint of a silver lining to this story is that Legionnaire's is not an infection that can be easily spread via direct contact between one person and another. Infection control (especially when it comes to something as dangerous and potentially life-threatening as respiratory illnesses among an elderly population)…
eaglebeaky - Durham man shot by police - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Uhhh, TOL... I kinda hate to break this to you, but none of your rights are being violated in any way. First off, your comment looks like it was approved (I can see it; everyone else on the site can probably see it too). Your First Amendment rights have literally nothing at all to do with whether a privately-owned website (such as this one) allows you to post comments on their site. The Quincy Journal…

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1 year, 4 months ago from thonline.com

Chicago-area mothers see farming operations up close

From from thonline.com:

The sows were due to give birth in a matter of days or even hours, a fact betrayed by their strained facial expressions and plump bellies. As a group of women walked through the Kane County, Ill., hog barn's equivalent of a maternity ward, one of them paused for a moment of cross-species empathy.

"I remember those days," she said.

The 20 or so women, all Chicago-area mothers, were on a tour last month at the fragrant structure where about 750 sows give birth to thousands of piglets each year. Visits like these represent a change in tack for America's conventional farmers, many of whom believe their work is unfairly portrayed in popular culture and poorly understood by the masses.

Amid a growing realization that many suburban and urban dwellers have little firsthand knowledge of agriculture, farm bureaus in Illinois' Lake and Cook counties send speakers to schools for lessons on everything from farm economics to where sausage comes from. Some organizations also offer summer programs that take teachers to farms.

By opening his family's hog and grain operation to last month's tour, Eldon Gould hoped to give the mothers a better sense of where their dinner originates while allaying any fears about larger-scale farms.

The farmers answered the women's questions -- including a few on hotly debated topics -- and told how, with any luck, the newborns they saw would be sold as pork chops within a year.

"I think there's so much misinformation out there that we try to bring a little truth to it," said Gould, a farmer for more than 50 years who tends the plot outside Maple Park with his family.

Cornfields and hog barns dot wide swaths of the American landscape, and Illinois is home to some of the world's most productive farmland. But with technology's advances and suburbia's sprawl, only a sliver of the population still earns a living off the land.

Even with fewer people tending the soil, interest in food's origins might be at an all-time high. Words like "organic" and "natural" dot grocery shelves, many times with the clear implication that such offerings are more wholesome than others. Some consumers also have expressed concerns with genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, that are ubiquitous in American crop farming but regulated more strictly in the European Union.

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