Monday, Apr 21, 2014
Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Trending on the Journal

Recent Comments

eaglebeaky - Illinois lawmakers to discuss money for Obama library - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Wall Street was solidly in the Romney/Ryan camp last time, pjohnf. (And assuming he's the nominee, they'll certainly be in Ryan's camp in 2016.) Why is it that you seem to think that they're Obama supporters?
eaglebeaky - Illinois lawmakers to discuss money for Obama library - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
When did presidential libraries start taking this kind of funding? (I always thought they were privately funded... or at least I remember hearing that the Clinton and Bush #43 libraries were being done that way.)
eaglebeaky - Voter rights, crime victim rights amendments set for fall ballot so far - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJo
Off-topic, but just to clarify, I will say that the disabled individuals that I've worked with aren't the least bit interested in free phones or anything like that. (Many of them will never live independently in their own communities; any such "bribes" would be meaningless to them.) Of course there are opportunists who do try to take advantage of every social program under the sun, and…
AYHSMB - Illinois lawmakers to discuss money for Obama library - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe Reagan, Bush 1, Clinton, and Bush 2, had libraries built with private funds. I can't believe Soros or Buffett (or the Clinton's ;P) aren't contributing to the bill for Obama. Rahm is even stumping for it, as he says it will be a big tourism money maker. Hey, I'm all for it, if it is. On a side note, I think this is the first presidential…
eaglebeaky - Voter rights, crime victim rights amendments set for fall ballot so far - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJo
I honestly couldn't care less about anybody's party affiliation. This ID issue actually has A LOT to do with poor people, the elderly, and people with disabilities -- regardless of their personal politics. (There are a lot of poor people in the south who are lifelong Republicans.) Arbitrarily-enacted voter ID laws ultimately won't disenfranchise you or me... but they do have a real…

Most Popular

Two die in overnight house fire Updated

Petroleum Marketers, C-Stores, fight proposed Illinois gas tax hikes Updated Video

City department heads attempt to justify budgets to aldermen

Adams Co. Divorces for April, 18 2014

Firefighters and Bus Drivers contracts to go to City Council

Fowler man arrested for meth possession

Home Builders, Illinois House look to weaken Fire Marshal authority

U.S. Senator from Illinois Mark Kirk tours Blessing Hospital's stroke unit

Better sweet corn research leads to better production

2 months, 3 weeks ago From illinoisagconnection.com

There are other metrics more important in sweet corn grown for processing than grain yeild

While grain yield is economically important in field corn production, there are other metrics more important in sweet corn grown for processing, said Marty Williams, a USDA-ARS ecologist and University of Illinois crop sciences researcher.

In a study recently published in Field Crops Research, Williams questioned whether the crop yield responses that have been previously reported in sweet corn research are actually helpful to the industry.

"What has been done in the past is analogous to predicting someone's height based on their shoe size, as opposed to actually measuring their height," Williams said.

After collecting and studying sweet corn data representing 31 hybrids across 22 locations in Illinois over an 8-year period, Williams said he sees a disconnect in what researchers are measuring in the field and what processors and seed companies need to know in order to make improved production decisions.

In other words, Williams said researchers need to start speaking the same language as the sweet corn industry.

Williams explained that the two variables that affect processor decisions most include recovery (percentage of kernels that can be canned or bagged from the green-ear mass) and case production (cases per acre of processed kernels).

However, he added that nearly all historic and recent field research in processing sweet corn reports neither of these variables, regardless of whether the studies pertained to plant pathology, fertility management, pest control, or sweet corn breeding and genetics.

"Ear number or green-ear mass are often the only crop responses reported in research on field productivity of processing sweet corn. Sometimes, other crop responses are reported, including plant traits such as height or canopy density, or ear traits such as ear length or ear width," he said.

In his study, Williams looked for relationships between processor variables and 17 crop traits (5 plant traits, 8 ear traits, and 4 yield traits). He determined that none of the crop traits predicted recovery.

"Recovery is something that has to be measured directly. Currently, there's no way to predict it," he explained.

When comparing the variability of the estimates in case production based on traits such as green-ear mass, husked-ear mass, and ear number, he determined that fresh kernel mass also was a far superior predictor of case production.

"Essentially, the more a measured yield response physically resembled a case of sweet corn, the more precise and accurate the estimate of case production," he reported.

The challenge in getting the necessary data is the costs associated with the equipment and labor, according to Williams.

In order to collect information on fresh kernel mass, Williams and his team designed and built a portable, "mini-processing plant" that they use in the field at harvest to husk ears and cut fresh kernels.

"At the moment there isn't a viable alternative that's less expensive," he said. "Does the research community continue to report mediocre data, or do we invest in an approach that gives the sweet corn industry exactly what it needs to make use of our research?"

Another obstacle is the narrow window of time when sweet corn is harvested, usually by hand, for research. Though field corn for grain production is harvested at physiological maturity, sweet corn is harvested at the R3 stage (milk stage), while kernel moisture is at approximately 72 to 76 percent. "When sweet corn is ripe, waiting is not an option," Williams explained.

A change in the way sweet corn research is done will have an impact on how processors, growers, and seed companies make decisions in the future, according to the researcher.

"Applied research aimed at improving crop productivity is predicated on the ability to accurately measure important crop responses, such as yield. For processing sweet corn, the most important responses include recovery and case production," he said. "Those of us in the research community can't expect the sweet corn industry to adopt our research-based findings when we're failing to measure what's truly important."

"Few crop traits accurately predict variables important to productivity of processing sweet corn," is published in the February 2014 issue of Field Crop Research and can be accessed online at www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378429013004073.


From the Newsroom

QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 6 hours, 58 minutes ago

Arbor Day Foundation names Quincy Tree City USA - Quincy achieved Tree City USA recognition by meeting the program... http://t.co/TfFCAOWaW2
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 7 hours, 11 minutes ago

RT @ShooterMcGavin_: Remember today is Easter, not 4/20. We’re to be honoring Jesus Christ, not Bob Marley.
QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 12 hours, 1 minute ago

IFT launches FutureFood 2050 to highlight solutions to feed 9 Billion http://t.co/Gj1GsFMrCH
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 13 hours, 23 minutes ago

RT @WordOnFire: Christ is risen. Indeed, he is truly risen. Amen. Alleluia! http://t.co/nBD7xhY9aF http://t.co/9pKNma37XD