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Recent Comments

ONCEMORE1 - Yard waste stickers a no-go - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Lower costs? Fewer pickups? Lower salary? The same trucks, running the same routes because some people will still be putting yard waste out. And if you think City workers will cut their own paid hours because of fewer pickups, you're delusional.
TheyRclueless - First bid for QHS expansion awarded - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
He's been contemplating his decision for the last several months while spending his time in Sarasota, Florida and still collecting his $180,000....very smart man to get away with that and still have the Board President say he's great!
HuhWhy - Yard waste stickers a no-go - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
If I were a betting man.... I would bet that the city council on Monday does not pass the budget. it will be like 9-5 opposed. Then a special council meeting on Thursday to try and pass a budget on Friday.
QuincyGuy - Kirk, Durbin praise Lynch\'s record after Senate vote - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
pjohnf - I couldn't have said it better myself. Aren't we, in Illinois, 'blessed' with representation in Washington? We can thank Chicago for that.
WarCry - Yard waste stickers a no-go - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
You're 100% right that it would change what some people do, including - it seems - yourself. And do you know what that would result in? Lower costs to the city. Fewer pick-ups due to people doing it themselves means lower vehicle maintenance. Lower salary expense due to decreased hours. Yes, some people would stop using the service, which reduces the EXPENSE of providing that service. The point…

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A soybean's journey

1 year, 3 months ago From Illinoisagconnection.com

When a farmer unloads soybeans at the elevator after harvest, it may seem like the end of a long journey that was full of hard work and patience. But the elevator is actually just the first stop on a voyage that takes U.S. soybeans to various markets domestically and abroad. For soybean farmers wanting to know more about their customers beyond the elevator, and the soy checkoff's role in marketing U.S. soy to those customers, the United Soybean Board (USB) invites them to participate in the checkoff's See for Yourself program.

All U.S. soybean farmers over the age of 18 can apply now for the seventh annual See for Yourself program. To apply, visit the USB website, www.UnitedSoybean.org/SeeforYourself, through April 4.

"The See for Yourself program is a once-in-a-lifetime experience," said David Hartke, chair of USB's Audit & Evaluation committee, which sponsors See for Yourself. "Participants get the opportunity to see the checkoff up close and the work it does to improve the bottom lines for U.S. soybean farmers across the country."

The program offers 10 U.S. soybean farmers the chance to learn about and evaluate specific investment areas of the soy checkoff, such as international marketing, animal agriculture, industrial uses and soybean farmers' freedom to operate.

Participants first travel to St. Louis, to witness firsthand, the operations of the checkoff and visit local sites related to domestic uses for soybeans.

Then, since about half of the soy produced in the United States is exported, participants will travel internationally to experience how international customers use soy.

"USB believes this program is important because participants not only see the checkoff first-hand, they also have the chance to evaluate its programs, as well," said Hartke, a soybean farmer from Teutopolis, Ill. "As a USB farmer-leader, I appreciate the perspectives these farmers bring and hearing their opinions on checkoff investments."

The program is scheduled to take place Aug. 15-22 and USB will cover all related rooming, meal and travel expenses.

The 70 farmer-directors of USB oversee the investments of the soy checkoff to maximize profit opportunities for all U.S. soybean farmers. These volunteers invest and leverage checkoff funds to increase the value of U.S. soy meal and oil, to ensure U.S. soybean farmers and their customers have the freedom and infrastructure to operate, and to meet the needs of U.S. soy's customers. As stipulated in the federal Soybean Promotion, Research and Consumer Information Act, the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service has oversight responsibilities for USB and the soy checkoff.


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