Friday, Apr 25, 2014
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pamarshall - City/Firefighters labor contract must be voted on again - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
As the article states, a council member can renew the resolution bringing it up for another vote when everyone shows up...
pamarshall - Quincy City Budget hearings and Council meeting - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Since you're a small business owner, you probably don't have to deal with an union representing your employees. With them being unionized, they have a lot more pull than a single employee coming to you for a raise. You could tell your employee "no", they could either be understanding or they could leave your job and work for the next small business owner that provides raises. You tell…
pamarshall - Quincy City Budget hearings and Council meeting - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Anything costs less than that stupid debacle... Even the tearing down of the Newcomb cost less.
pamarshall - Video: Two GOP reps announce support for legalizing illegals - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
If I recall, they are offering what's called "a pathway to citizenship" or "a pathway to amnesty". They can't get into legal trouble (aside from entering our country), they have to get an education, there's a lot of things they have to do in order to get amnesty. Another thing they can do is join our military. If they're willing to fight and die for our country, isn't…
yesqcy - City/Firefighters labor contract must be voted on again - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Wow, you got me thinking hard, which isn't hard to do. I m certain the council will have it figured out (surely), but since it didn't pass, doesn't someone that voted against it have to make a motion to bring it back to a vote and have to vote YES automatically? Or where am I dreaming that up from?

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Defined by critics, big ag restarts conversation

3 months, 3 weeks ago AP

Industry has come under fire for GMO's, hormones, and inhumane treatment of animals

From AP:

Add one more item to the list of chores that Larry Hasheider has to do on his 1,700-acre farm: defending his business to the American public.

There's a lot of conversation about traditional agriculture recently, and much of it is critical. Think genetically modified crops, overuse of hormones and antibiotics, inhumane treatment of animals and over-processed foods.

This explosion of talk about food – some based on fact, some based on fiction – has already transformed the marketplace. Slow to respond and often defensive, farmers and others in agribusiness have for several years let critics define the public debate and influence consumers. Now, the industry is trying to push farmers and businesses to fight back, connecting with those consumers through social media and outreach that many in agriculture have traditionally shunned.

"We as farmers now have another role in addition to being farmers," Hasheider says as he takes a break from harvesting his corn crop. "It's something you have to evolve into."

In addition to corn, Hasheider grows soybeans, wheat and alfalfa on the farm nestled in the heart of Illinois corn country. He cares for 130 dairy cows, 500 beef cattle and 30,000 hogs. And now, he's giving tours of his farm, something he says he never would have done 20 years ago.

"We didn't think anyone would be interested in what we were doing," he says.

Like a lot of other farmers, Hasheider was wrong.

Take the issue of genetically modified foods. There has been little scientific evidence to prove that foods grown from engineered seeds are less safe than their conventional counterparts, but consumer concerns and fears – many perpetuated through social media and the Internet – have forced the issue. A campaign to require labeling of modified ingredients on food packages has steadily gained attention, and some retailers have vowed not to sell them at all.

Makers of the engineered seeds and the farmers and retailers who use them stayed largely silent, even as critics put forth a simple, persuasive argument: Consumers have a right to know if they are eating genetically modified foods.

Modified seeds are now used to grow almost all of the nation's corn and soybean crops, most of which are turned into animal feed.

The Center for Science in the Public Interest, a well-known critic of food companies and artificial and unhealthy ingredients in foods, has not opposed genetically modified foods, on the basis that there's no evidence they are harmful.

Still, director Michael Jacobson says, the issue has taken on a life of its own to the general public.

Companies like Monsanto Corp. "try to argue back with facts, but emotions often trump facts," Jacobson says. "They are faced with a situation where critics have an emotional argument, a fear of the unknown."

Click Here to Read Full Article


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