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jannie122 - Mays not seeking re-election to Quincy School Board - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
There has been a lot of info about the school board election in the media. But, Are the same people that were on the Quincy Park Board running? Or, maybe that election isn't held at the same time the School Board Election? Sorry to see Jeff M. go, although I didn't agree with him all the time.
Givemeliberty - Mayor Moore talks garbage...again - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
What property of the city does Comsast use? The biggest chunk of property leased to them is probably Amerens power poles, unless they have buildings residing on city property that I am not aware of. the fee paid to the phone company is paid by whoever is leasing the line. If Adams provides DSL to a customer in quincy and they do not have any plant in the area but AT&T does Adams can rent the line…
GuyFawkes10 - Mayor Moore talks garbage...again - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
I think Ameren pays also. Maybe we should put up toll booth to enter city so we can tax the people from out of town for using our services. I guess we get them at the cash register but we pay that also
Peoplechamp31 - QPS Board approves higher 2014 tax levy - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
If you guys and Mr Gough want to have a real convo why don't you ask Peters and the district how come my kids have to wear winter coats into the Qhs building and why we have so many problems out there with the new HVAC system!
Peoplechamp31 - QPS Board approves higher 2014 tax levy - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
They..... I'm fully aware of some of there wages as well! But there not in the media making comments about things they don't know anything about! Irving should have been sold along time ago! We have people renting it from us knowing we will never use this building again! I mean look at Dewey school way worse than Irving by far, but our kids are in that building still! I don't want to…

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Thirst for U.S. craft beer grows overseas

4 months, 3 weeks ago from Associated Press

Helping to quench a growing thirst for American craft beer overseas, some of the United States' largest craft breweries are setting up shop in Europe, challenging the very beers that inspired them on their home turfs.

It's the latest phenomenon in the flourishing craft beer industry, which got its start emulating the European brews that defined many of the beer styles we drink today. The move also marks a continuing departure from the status quo of mass market lagers or stouts, demonstrating a willingness of American breweries to explore — and innovate — old world beer styles from Belgium, Germany and the United Kingdom.

The U.S. craft beer scene is so fresh and dynamic, Europeans are becoming as excited about it as Americans, says Mike Hinkley, co-founder of San Diego-based Green Flash Brewing Co. "Even though they're used to all these amazing European beers, now there's just more variety."

U.S. craft beer exports grew six-fold during the past five years, jumping from about 46,000 barrels in 2009 to more than 282,500 barrels in 2013, worth an estimated $73 million, according to the Brewers Association, the Colorado-based trade group for the majority of the 3,000 brewing companies in the United States. Of course, it's still a fraction of overall production; U.S. craft brewers produced a total of 15.6 million barrels last year.

Green Flash recently became the first U.S. craft brewery to begin making and selling fresh beer in the European market under a deal with Brasserie St-Feuillien, a Belgian brewery founded in 1873. Under the watchful eye of Green Flash brewmaster Chuck Silva, the brewery is making and selling fresh West Coast IPA for distribution in the U.K., Belgium, France, the Netherlands and Italy.

Meanwhile, 500 miles away in Berlin, Stone Brewing Co. is taking a different approach to meeting overseas demand — spending about $25 million to renovate a historic gas works building into a brewery, packaging and distribution center, restaurant and garden set to open late next year or early 2016. Escondido, Calif.-based Stone — one of the top 10 biggest craft breweries in the U.S. — will make beer for its bistro and distribution throughout Germany and Europe.

"The idea that we're going to go across the pond as it were to brew our style of beers fresh in Europe is an exciting prospect for us," said Stone CEO and co-founder Greg Koch, who announced the overseas expansion plans. "When we started out at Stone 18 years ago, we were inspired by a lot of the European brewers ... and now to see an inspiration bounce back around the world, that's amazing."

Brooklyn Brewery's brewmaster Garrett Oliver agreed, saying what used to be a one-way street in the beer world is coming full-circle: "The creative spirit and ideas that have been developing in the U.S. are flowing back in that direction. Now it's a two-way street and we all have something to offer."

In the spring, New York's Brooklyn Brewery and Carlsberg Sweden opened a craft brewery and restaurant making new beers that are being distributed throughout Scandinavia. The staff of Nya Carnegie in Stockholm was hired by Brooklyn Brewery and trained by its brewmaster. Brooklyn Brewery is still exporting its own beers to more than 20 countries in addition to its joint venture and also is looking at similar projects in other European capitals, South America and Asia. Around 30 percent of its business is exports.

But the thirst for American craft beer hasn't always been there.

When the Brewers Association first gave presentations overseas about the American craft beer scene about 10 years ago, people would laugh aloud. They'd even quote a Monty Python skit comparing American beer to water.

"They're not laughing anymore," said Bob Pease, chief operating officer for the U.S. beer trade group. "The word is out now that the highest quality beer, the most diverse beer, is coming from American craft brewers."


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