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Givemeliberty - Iowa company pitches Newcomb development proposal - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
The pill Hobart is wanting the city to take would be easier to swallow, if they were bringing American Family, AT&T, Motorola, or something like it to fill up this building with 300-400 Jobs. Sadly though projects like the one I just described or the Newcome Lofts will only come to this area with help from the City or County (not saying the city should give in to all of Hobarts demands) because the…
UrKidsWillPay - Mayor Moore discusses Newcomb proposal - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
The TIF district does not include a Property Tax abatement. Those are features of the Enterprise Zone which this site is not a part of. Would like to know how we are going to force that one through against our rules.....not that I doubt they will do it. Take a look at the eligible TIF expenses and tell me where they are going to lie to us to classify 1.8 million of a 4 million project as TIF eligible.…
UrKidsWillPay - Quincy Police Blotter for September 30, 2014 - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Could be or it could be for a burnout. which could be defined as unsafe because you lack complete traction. Or it could be for accelerating too fast but not buring the tires and without going over the speed limit. or she could have exited a private drive like the bowling alley without properly yielding.
qfingers - Mayor Moore discusses Newcomb proposal - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Just remember that getting taxable property there doesn't bring in any extra $$ for the city. What it does is lower property taxes for the rest of us. Obviously more $$ back for more expensive properties (i.e. same % saved across the board).
1950Brutus - Study finds reasons Springfield Diocese Catholics have left the Church - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJou
I share many of the experiences described here by others – for me though the crossroad was when the church changed the definition of a “mortal sin”. With a stroke of the pen all of a sudden it became OK to eat meat on Friday and attending mass on Sat night fulfilled one’s obligation for Sunday. This still doesn’t make sense to me. A MORTAL SIN isn’t something that is open to a definition change – not…

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Illinois towns see jobs ahead in medical marijuana

2 months, 2 weeks ago Associated Press

30 day application period opens soon for cultivation centers

From Associated Press:

The prospect of adding jobs - even as few as 30 - has led officials in many shrinking Illinois' communities to set aside any qualms about the state's legalization of medical marijuana and to get friendly with would-be growers.

The aspiring growers and their agents have been racing from town to town, shaking hands with civic leaders and promising to bring jobs and tax revenue if they're able to snag one of the 21 cultivation permits the state will grant this fall. Although not a single plant has sprouted, Illinois' new medical marijuana industry is pushing the boundaries of what is considered attractive economic development.

"It's been a long time since we've had a company say, `Hey, we want to bring in 50 jobs and we want to bring in tax revenue to your school,'" said Liz Skinner, the mayor of Delavan, a central Illinois city of 1,700 residents. The city has annexed property optioned by Joliet-based ICC Holdings as a possible site for a marijuana cultivation center, and Skinner said a new tax increment financing district may be the next step.

Stephen Osborne, an attorney who represents a group vying for one of the growing permits, has been driving from town to town in southern Illinois and introducing himself to local officials. Mostly, he's been welcomed warmly: "It's a `What took you so long to get here' type of response," he said. "Once you mention 30 or more jobs in a small community, they'll listen to what you have to say."

A majority of Americans - 54 percent - favor making marijuana legal at least for medicinal use, according to a Pew Research Center poll of 1,821 adults conducted in February. The survey had a margin of error of plus or minus 2.6 percentage points. New York recently became the 23rd state to make medical marijuana legal. Six months before the Illinois law was enacted, a poll by the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute at Southern Illinois University found that 63 percent of Illinoisans favored making medical use of marijuana legal.

In Illinois, city councils from Crystal Lake to Peru to Marion are considering marijuana zoning ordinances and special use permits, though the state is not tracking precisely how many. Permit seekers have simply moved on from the few communities that have voted down such proposals.

The process for building local support "starts with a conversation over the phone," explained Michael Mayes, CEO of Chicago-based Quantum 9 Inc., a cannabis consulting company that has helped win permits for marijuana producers in four other states. He said the ultimate goal would be to get a letter of recommendation from a mayor that can be submitted to the state.

Aspiring marijuana producers expect Illinois to launch a 30-day application period soon and are rushing to get their paperwork in order. To win a cultivation center permit, they'll be required to show their plans comply with local zoning rules.

Bonus points toward a winning bid can be had by submitting plans to "give back to the local community," according to draft rules under legislative review. In Delavan, Mayor Skinner said there has been talk of a cultivation center-supported gift for a drug task force, but no hard promises.

It's still unclear how many groups will compete for permits and whether applications will emerge in all regions of the state.

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