Monday, Sep 22, 2014
Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Trending on the Journal

Related Headlines

Moody’s says Illinois Supreme Court ruling is ‘credit negative’ for state

Recent Comments

MountainMan - QPD nabs 66 in latest STEP detail - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
you must be prepared though, the police generally prefer "sheep" (skip to about min 3) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Irh04jsMNJ8 now in this Video everyone involved could of done certain things better, but its obvious the "Drill Sargent" wanted everyone to know who the big dog on the porch was.
1950Brutus - Illinois has troublesome food stamps to jobs ratio - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
I think we need a new word in the English language - "absurd" doesn't adequately describe this spin. Nancy would love these numbers - she would say more people are painting or writing - not wasting their time working to buy food.
Rrreality - Illinois has troublesome food stamps to jobs ratio - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Pathetic Quinn's spin is absurd, hopefully his days are numbered. Now all we need is Nancy Pelosi making a visit to either Chicago or Springfield...
qfingers - Lovelace autopsy questions grow - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
I'm a little wonderous here...in the example case of the two-year-old the new pathologists claimed death from one of two unrelated causes. I would assume they were saying BOTH of those things occurred and the blow to the abdomen caused the lacerated liver and that they just couldn't be sure which one caused death first.
1950Brutus - One year after concealed carry, Chicago homicide rate plunges - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
The jury will be out on this until we hear from Al Gore as to the impact of conceal/carry on global warming.

Most Popular

Quincy's Long John Silver's closed

One year after concealed carry, Chicago homicide rate plunges

Adams Co. Divorces for Sept. 19

Lovelace autopsy questions grow

Quincy man arrested for selling crack cocaine

Where $1 million is going at Quincy Regional Airport

Lovelace's next court appearance delayed by a day

Wine Pull to benefit local business

Candidates need to address pensions

2 months, 2 weeks ago Christopher Z. Mooney, The News-Gazette

It is underfunded by probably more than $100 billion

From Christopher Z. Mooney, The News-Gazette:

You may not have noticed, but on July 3, the Illinois State Supreme Court dealt a body blow to the state's body politic.

The case was Kanerva vs. Weems. You can be forgiven if it escaped your attention — most of the mainstream media missed it or buried it (although The News-Gazette had excellent coverage of it). But Kanerva vs. Weems will have a major impact on the state's finances for a generation. As such, it should also have a major impact on the fall's gubernatorial campaign debates. That is, if the candidates can get past their watches, personal income tax strategies, and minor professional peccadillos.

As you know, decades of underfunding and overpromising by state policymakers has threatened the solvency of Illinois' state public pension systems. It is underfunded by probably more than $100 billion. That's a big number — by far the biggest in the nation. It is approximately enough money to operate the entire state government — prisons, parks, state police, and everything else — for three years. Public pension debt has contributed heavily to the recent bankruptcy of Detroit and other local governments, so policymakers and the bond rating agencies (who determine how much the state pays to borrow money for new roads, bridges, and schools) are very concerned with this.

But as Bruce Springsteen once wrote, this is "a debt that no honest man can pay."

So in 2012 and 2013, after much political angst and drama, the General Assembly and Gov. Pat Quinn adopted two measures designed to address the problem. To simplify, they eliminated free health insurance for retirees, and they made major changes in the retirees' annuity payouts. They argued that these reforms solved the pension problem, and Gov. Quinn touted pension reform as one of the central accomplishments of his administration.

The only problem was the Illinois State Constitution. And in Kanerva vs. Weems, the state Supreme Court just reminded the governor and General Assembly of that.

Article VIII, section 5 of the State Constitution states that:

Membership in any pension or retirement system of the State shall be an enforceable contractual relationship, the benefits of which shall not be diminished or impaired.

But didn't the two pension reform bills effectively "diminish or impair" pension benefits? A common-sense answer from reading this section would be, "yes." But the General Assembly and governor pushed a different reading, one that was so continually repeated by them that the media and most commentators bought into it.

It was up to the state Supreme Court to say that the emperor had no clothes.

Kanerva vs. Weems dealt with the more minor of the pension reforms — making retirees pay health insurance premiums. Many policymakers argued that certainly this was somehow separable from "pension benefits" to the extent that the court would allow it to be cut, even if it disallowed cuts to the annuities. In fact, the argument was made that if the court threw out the annuity changes, these premiums might be to barter with retirees for other cuts.

Click Here to Read Full Article


From the Newsroom

Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 4 hours, 7 minutes ago

RT @ClimateDepot: Al Gore Leaves People’s Climate March in Chevy Suburban SUV http://t.co/TcrjNqfKu7
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 4 hours, 7 minutes ago

RT @DanWetzel: RT @Deadspin: The political-messaging huckster behind Roger Goodell's disastrous performance: http://t.co/LqQ24n7gm7
QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 6 hours, 49 minutes ago

Illinois has troublesome food stamps to jobs ratio http://t.co/S7pyeUYwFo