Saturday, Apr 25, 2015
Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Trending on the Journal

Related Headlines

Moody’s says Illinois Supreme Court ruling is ‘credit negative’ for state

Recent Comments

GoQuincy - QPD Blotter for April 25, 2015 - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
I wonder who he was trying to impersonate???
yesqcy - Bruce Rauner\'s budget cuts slash social services - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Again with the crazy talk..... The working person is the blame? And what do you mean not his budget? You read the short article right?
chebby79 - QPD Blotter for April 25, 2015 - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Brian...everybody knows who you are.
chebby79 - Yard waste stickers a no-go - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
it would not have generated $500k anyway. at $2.50 a sticker, folks would change what they do. either haul it down there themselves, or mulch, or compost piles. I recently mowed and had 4 barrels of grass x $2.50 = $10 x 4 weeks = $40 a month. for $40 a month I would change what I do. I'm close enuf tho, so I hauled it to Radio Road site. perhaps, raise the garbage stickers. double the price.…
pjohnf - Illinois House Passes Bill To Make Some Marijuana Possession Punishable By Ticket - Quincy, IL News
Good idea, we waste way too much time and resources chasing pot users. Our court systems and law enforcement are tied up in enforcing pot laws when they could be spending their time and resources on real crime. Pot use is no worse than the use of alcohol so we should treat pot the same as we treat alcohol use.

Most Popular

Quincy Mayor, Police & Fire Chiefs disagree over proposed budget cuts

Wisconsin Shame: " I thought it was a home invasion"

Dreyer: “We think we’re in the right direction”

First bid for QHS expansion awarded

Rauner questions the need for 850-plus school districts in Illinois

Quincy’s Steak ‘n Shake to re-open

Wentzville Obamacare contractor paid 13,000 hours of overtime

Good Samaritans help Quincy man

Candidates need to address pensions

9 months, 2 weeks ago Christopher Z. Mooney, The News-Gazette

It is underfunded by probably more than $100 billion

From Christopher Z. Mooney, The News-Gazette:

You may not have noticed, but on July 3, the Illinois State Supreme Court dealt a body blow to the state's body politic.

The case was Kanerva vs. Weems. You can be forgiven if it escaped your attention — most of the mainstream media missed it or buried it (although The News-Gazette had excellent coverage of it). But Kanerva vs. Weems will have a major impact on the state's finances for a generation. As such, it should also have a major impact on the fall's gubernatorial campaign debates. That is, if the candidates can get past their watches, personal income tax strategies, and minor professional peccadillos.

As you know, decades of underfunding and overpromising by state policymakers has threatened the solvency of Illinois' state public pension systems. It is underfunded by probably more than $100 billion. That's a big number — by far the biggest in the nation. It is approximately enough money to operate the entire state government — prisons, parks, state police, and everything else — for three years. Public pension debt has contributed heavily to the recent bankruptcy of Detroit and other local governments, so policymakers and the bond rating agencies (who determine how much the state pays to borrow money for new roads, bridges, and schools) are very concerned with this.

But as Bruce Springsteen once wrote, this is "a debt that no honest man can pay."

So in 2012 and 2013, after much political angst and drama, the General Assembly and Gov. Pat Quinn adopted two measures designed to address the problem. To simplify, they eliminated free health insurance for retirees, and they made major changes in the retirees' annuity payouts. They argued that these reforms solved the pension problem, and Gov. Quinn touted pension reform as one of the central accomplishments of his administration.

The only problem was the Illinois State Constitution. And in Kanerva vs. Weems, the state Supreme Court just reminded the governor and General Assembly of that.

Article VIII, section 5 of the State Constitution states that:

Membership in any pension or retirement system of the State shall be an enforceable contractual relationship, the benefits of which shall not be diminished or impaired.

But didn't the two pension reform bills effectively "diminish or impair" pension benefits? A common-sense answer from reading this section would be, "yes." But the General Assembly and governor pushed a different reading, one that was so continually repeated by them that the media and most commentators bought into it.

It was up to the state Supreme Court to say that the emperor had no clothes.

Kanerva vs. Weems dealt with the more minor of the pension reforms — making retirees pay health insurance premiums. Many policymakers argued that certainly this was somehow separable from "pension benefits" to the extent that the court would allow it to be cut, even if it disallowed cuts to the annuities. In fact, the argument was made that if the court threw out the annuity changes, these premiums might be to barter with retirees for other cuts.

Click Here to Read Full Article


From the Newsroom

QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 4 hours, 27 minutes ago

Adobe gives all of its employees a $1,000 gift card with basically no strings attached http://t.co/r6nG6dEcbp
QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 13 hours, 28 minutes ago

Cubs Score 4 Times in 11th for 7-3 Win Over Reds http://t.co/jeUPekUVpK
QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 13 hours, 28 minutes ago

Martinez Pitches Cardinals Past Brewers 3-0 http://t.co/xswkkCCfQK
QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 21 hours, 26 minutes ago

Pepsi to ditch aspartame in Diet Pepsi http://t.co/YrVj03H2UX