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qcity05 - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
I think QJHS's size has a lot to do with it being kept as well. Imagine the cost to rebuild a school of that size. Early in the discussion I recall someone bringing up the idea of building a new high school and architects said that it could easily cost 100 million.
ONCEMORE1 - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Do you even have a clue what you're talking about?
Wiseguy14 - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
The most interesting thing about this is that SRN&M was only charging the district 80 bucks an hour for legal. Good luck getting that rate next time you slip and fall.
Loverofblues - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
35 years and your health care is covered by Tri Care
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The race card gets pulled out when the liberals don't have any logical arguments left in their bag. They are saying "I can't win this debate with facts so I will assault your character". It is an attempt to win by intimidation. Very sad.

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Amazon Sales Take a Hit in States With Online Tax

5 months, 3 weeks ago From Bloomberg.com

However, brick and mortar stores haven't benefited as shoppers turn to other online outlets

From From Bloomberg.com:

Amazon.com Inc. (AMZN) is taking a hit in states that are collecting an online sales tax.

In one of the first efforts to quantify the impact of states accruing more tax revenue from Web purchases, researchers at Ohio State University published a paper this month that found sales dropped for Amazon when the online charge was introduced. In states that have the tax, households reduced their spending on Amazon by about 10 percent compared to those in states that don’t have the levy. For online purchases of more than $300, sales fell by 24 percent, according to the report titled “The Amazon Tax.”

The findings add to concerns about how much the world’s largest online retailer can expand. The Seattle-based company, which reports quarterly earnings on April 24, has been grappling with decelerating revenue growth amid heavy spending by Chief Executive Officer Jeff Bezos on new initiatives. Amazon has enjoyed an edge against brick-and-mortar retailers because consumers didn’t have to pay a sales tax for purchases from the e-commerce site, yet that has eroded as states including California and Texas have unveiled the levies.

"There is no ambiguity,” Brian Baugh, one of the report’s authors from Ohio State’s Fisher College of Business, said in an interview yesterday. “It has been their competitive advantage.”

State Coffers

The push by states to collect taxes on Internet purchases has gathered momentum in the past few years. Amazon collects sales tax in 20 states, according to its website. More are set to follow as the company has become a popular target to help state governments generate more revenue to cover budget shortfalls; Florida is set to begin charging a tax on May 1. States lose an estimated $23 billion a year in uncollected sales taxes from Web retailers.

``As analysts have noted, Amazon offers the best prices with or without sales tax,'' Ty Rogers, a spokesman for Amazon, said in an e-mail.

Amazon and other online retailers have fought some efforts to implement the taxes, with the U.S. Supreme Court in December rejecting an appeal by the company to rule against a New York law forcing it to collect money from customers. New York and others have said the push to tax Amazon is an effort to treat online and brick-and-mortar retailers equally.

Amazon supports federal legislation that would explicitly let states require tax collections by all online retailers above a certain size.

Some analysts have previously said the online taxes had a minimal effect on Amazon’s sales. In a 2012 report, Matt Nemer, an analyst at Wells Fargo & Co., said consumers in Texas, which had recently introduced the levy, generally weren’t aware of the tax and doubted it would “materially impact” Amazon’s revenue.

245,000 Households

The Ohio State University researchers who wrote this month’s paper tracked the spending of about 245,000 households that shelled out at least $100 on Amazon during the first six months of 2012, and then kept tabs on them through the end of 2013. About a third of the subjects lived in California, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Texas and Virginia -- states where new tax laws were implemented during that time.

In addition to quantifying the sales impact, the researchers also concluded that brick-and-mortar stores didn’t hugely benefit from households reducing their spending on Amazon. That’s because many shoppers simply turned to online alternatives.

Click Here to Read Full Article


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