Sunday, Apr 26, 2015
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Recent Comments

ONCEMORE1 - Yard waste stickers a no-go - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Lower costs? Fewer pickups? Lower salary? The same trucks, running the same routes because some people will still be putting yard waste out. And if you think City workers will cut their own paid hours because of fewer pickups, you're delusional.
TheyRclueless - First bid for QHS expansion awarded - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
He's been contemplating his decision for the last several months while spending his time in Sarasota, Florida and still collecting his $180,000....very smart man to get away with that and still have the Board President say he's great!
HuhWhy - Yard waste stickers a no-go - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
If I were a betting man.... I would bet that the city council on Monday does not pass the budget. it will be like 9-5 opposed. Then a special council meeting on Thursday to try and pass a budget on Friday.
QuincyGuy - Kirk, Durbin praise Lynch\'s record after Senate vote - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
pjohnf - I couldn't have said it better myself. Aren't we, in Illinois, 'blessed' with representation in Washington? We can thank Chicago for that.
WarCry - Yard waste stickers a no-go - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
You're 100% right that it would change what some people do, including - it seems - yourself. And do you know what that would result in? Lower costs to the city. Fewer pick-ups due to people doing it themselves means lower vehicle maintenance. Lower salary expense due to decreased hours. Yes, some people would stop using the service, which reduces the EXPENSE of providing that service. The point…

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First bid for QHS expansion awarded

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Ill. jobs screened for political ties after hiring

1 year ago The Associated Press

The claims are raising questions about how closely the current administration has followed rules

From The Associated Press:

When questions arose about political hiring at the Illinois Department of Transportation, Gov. Pat Quinn's administration evaluated several jobs that already had been filled to ensure they were among the few positions where an applicant's political loyalty and connections could be considered.

But a 1990 U.S. Supreme Court ruling over government hiring in Illinois requires that question be answered before a job offer is even extended.

Michael Shakman, who spearheaded a landmark 1972 decree against political hiring, sued the Democratic governor this week in federal court. He is asking for a monitor to investigate employment at the Transportation Department after a report last year by the Better Government Association that for nearly 10 years, IDOT evaded both his Shakman Decree and the high court ruling known as Rutan in hiring people based on politics and later transferring them into positions protected from easy dismissal.

The claims - and the Quinn administration's response to it - are raising questions about how closely the current administration has followed those rules.

Quinn has said he has no tolerance for breaking the rules and that he ordered an audit of the jobs after learning of the discrepancies.

The BGA report found as many as 200 IDOT "staff assistant" positions filled in violation of Rutan under Quinn and his predecessor, Gov. Rod Blagojevich.

After Shakman's motion was filed in federal court on Tuesday, IDOT spokesman Guy Tridgell said the 61 jobs currently labeled as staff assistants were submitted for evaluation to the state's personnel agency, the Department of Central Management Services, to determine whether they should be covered by Rutan. The agency responded that 50 of them should be, and they will be treated as such in the future. There's no indication anyone hired will lose his job.

After-the-fact appraisal is not how Rutan is supposed to work, said Carl Draper, a Springfield lawyer who has been involved in several high-profile government hiring cases, including one in which 16 IDOT employees, fired by Blagojevich for political reasons, won back their jobs.

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