Saturday, Jul 4, 2015
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WarCry - How the SSM “anti-polygamy” movement turned into Animal Farm - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJ
Some monogamists "marry" underage kids, too. But that's breaking the law, same as it would be if polygamy was made legal. You're using deviant cases like Warren Jeffs to paint a picture of a whole host of people, and that's no more justified that calling the entire Catholic church pedophiles or all men serial killers because of John Wayne Gacy. You cannot paint with that broad of a…
Quijote57 - How the SSM “anti-polygamy” movement turned into Animal Farm - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJ
The Founding Fathers most likely did not intend for political liberty to include freedom to practice immorality. Liberty is too often confused with license. Yes, some of the Founders had immoral relationships (the supposed relationship between Jefferson and his female slave, for instance), but I don't think they intended for those to be codified as legal in all the states. And I don't think…
Quijote57 - How the SSM “anti-polygamy” movement turned into Animal Farm - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJ
You make valid arguments except this: in some instances, the polygamist marries an under-aged teenager who does not or cannot consent.
WarCry - How the SSM “anti-polygamy” movement turned into Animal Farm - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJ
For those of you who are throwing out "Why not polygamy??!!??!" like it's some sort of moralistic insult or challenge, I have a question for you: Why NOT polygamy? As long as everyone involved is a legal, consenting adult, why the hell would you care what they're doing? Guess what? There are a LOT of multi-partner relationships going on in this country RIGHT NOW and it's not affecting…
qfingers - How the SSM “anti-polygamy” movement turned into Animal Farm - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJ
Actually there's no reason for the state to issue a marriage license at all. Read the history of it: http://macquirelatory.com/Marriage%20License%20Tr...

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Illinois lawmakers push for state retirement plan

1 year, 3 months ago Associated Press

Calls for workers to enroll in state-run retirement plan if their employer doesn't provide one

From Associated Press:

Opponents of a proposed state retirement savings program for private-sector workers say the Democratic-backed plan would burden small businesses in an already struggling economy.

Similar to a plan pushed by President Barack Obama in his State of the Union address, the proposal sponsored by state Sen. Daniel Biss cleared a Senate committee earlier this month after lengthy debate. Now Biss has until an April 11 deadline for voting bills out of the Senate to gather support for the program, which has failed to gain approval in recent years.

The proposal calls for businesses without retirement plans and that have 10 or more employees to enroll workers in a savings program overseen by the state. Typically, 3 percent of each participant's paycheck would be pooled into a privately managed investment account overseen by a new state board. Employers would be required to sign up workers, but employees could opt out.

Biss wouldn't call the plan a part of the populist agenda in an election year but said "it is encouraging that there's so much discussion about ways to build ladders into the middle class for low wage workers." He says this program would help millions of Illinoisans who don't have access to employer retirement savings programs.

"I think the increasing discussion about income inequality has left people seeking a mechanism to address that growing problem, but also a mechanism that's not costly for government or for employers when we're experiencing still a far too high rate of unemployment," the Evanston Democrat said.

Democrats who control the Illinois House and Senate are pushing for a minimum wage increase, a graduated or "progressive" income tax that would require more from the wealthy and a tax on millionaires to fund education.

Business groups and Republicans who oppose the plan are asking instead for a study to determine if this plan could work, and they say they would partner to educate workers about saving for retirement.

Kim Clarke Maisch, the Illinois state policy director for the National Federation of Independent Business, said forcing businesses to enroll employees would add to costs and actually hurt low income workers.

"If you can't pay down your credit card and you can't afford groceries, and you can't afford gas for your car, do you really think that forcing them to take 3 percent out of their paycheck makes sense?" Maisch said, adding that the state shouldn't touch private sector retirement dollars after failing to manage public employee pensions.

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