Tuesday, May 26, 2015
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CoolEdge - Updated NASA Data: Global Warming Not Causing Any Polar Ice Retreat - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJourna
30 years of cooling (to 1980 or so) then 30 years warming They use the data on the warming half of one cycle, and call it "long term". They need 50 cycles, not one half of one cycle ... dishonest arses. They know damn well they start at the end of a long cooling period, yet don't account for it, and usual only a straight line linear regression for their argument, which hides the last 18 years…
CoolEdge - Updated NASA Data: Global Warming Not Causing Any Polar Ice Retreat - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJourna
"The rest of Taylor’s article is just whitewash intended to distract readers from these facts." So these guys are mind readers, not scientists? They can read his intent? Or they are using personal attacks when they don't have facts on their side? I think the U of I boyz are the ones spinning here. Taylor notes this short time range ... readings from 1979 are not "long term" when it…
Expatriate - Updated NASA Data: Global Warming Not Causing Any Polar Ice Retreat - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJourna
Al Gore is an idiot. There's no denying that. For the record, I bet Taylor understands the data just fine. That's how he knows where to cherry-pick.
Expatriate - Updated NASA Data: Global Warming Not Causing Any Polar Ice Retreat - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJourna
For one, he's not explaining to the reader that there's a difference between polar ice cap extent and polar ice cap volume. People monitoring global warming are less concerned with polar ice extent than they are with the total amount of ice. Take a peek at the declining volume in the Arctic: "April 2015 volume was 26% below the maximum April ice volume in 1979 and 13% below the 1979-2014…
Givemeliberty - Illinois Senate passes marijuana decriminalization bill but plans changes - Quincy, IL News - Quincy
I think it'll come, its just going to take time and some education on the pro and anti side of the debate. People will soon see the sky will not fall.

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AFSCME renews push for back pay

1 year, 2 months ago Doug Finke, Springfield State Journal-Register

Wages owed to state employees since 2011

From Doug Finke, Springfield State Journal-Register :
Despite warnings that more than $2.3 billion must be cut from next year’s state budget, the largest state employee union is renewing its call for money to be set aside to pay back wages owed to union workers.
The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees is again calling on lawmakers to approve one of the pending bills that would allocate $112 million to pay the wages owed to workers from as far back as 2011.
AFSCME has begun calculating how much is owed to workers in various parts of the state based on the number of workers in legislative districts. In the Springfield area, AFSCME says more than $17 million is owed to about 4,600 unionized state workers who did not get raises owed to them under previous union contracts.
“They do their jobs every day,” AFSCME Council 31 executive director Henry Bayer said in a statement. “It’s illegal and wrong to withhold wages for work performed.”
In the summer of 2011, Gov. Pat Quinn canceled contractual wage increases for more than 30,000 unionized state workers in 14 agencies and commissions because, he said, the General Assembly did not put money in the budget to pay them. Another 12,600 workers in other agencies did receive the raises they were due.
AFSCME fought to secure the wages due the workers. Both an arbitrator and a circuit judge ruled in favor of the workers and said the back wages had to be paid. The judge, though, said the wage payment hinged on the legislature approving money to pay it, which it has not done so far.
Meanwhile, Attorney General Lisa Madigan’s office is appealing the court ruling.
Since Quinn canceled the raises, hundreds of workers got them anyway after the administration found savings in budgets that could be redirected to pay the back wages. However, AFSCME said about $112 million is still owed to workers in the departments of Human Services, Corrections, Juvenile Justice, Natural Resources and Public Health.
AFSCME contends that since state revenues have come in stronger than expected this year, money should be set aside to honor the back wages.
“It’s a matter of the state making good on its obligations,” AFSCME spokesman Anders Lindall said. “Every legislator talks about the importance of paying down the state’s bill backlog. These wages are the state’s oldest unpaid bills by far.”
Comptroller Judy Baar Topinka’s office confirmed the back wages are part of the nearly $1.4 billion in bills the office says are 90 or more days past due.
Sen. Andy Manar, D-Bunker Hill, is sponsor of one of the bills that would allocate $112 million for the back wages. Manar said it would be best to pass a supplemental budget bill this spring that provided the money, but that at the least the money should be included in next year’s budget.

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