Tuesday, Sep 2, 2014
Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Trending on the Journal

Related Headlines

Fast food workers vow civil disobedience

Quinn approves minimum wage ballot question

Minimum wage referendum to appear on November ballot

IL House to take up ballot question on minimum wage

Illinois Democrats may ask for public opinion on minimum wage hike

Recent Comments

babysafehaven - Abandoned baby calls to mind Safe Haven laws - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
The future of Baby Safe Haven law awareness is in the /hands of young people who will go out and tell their peers on all platforms of the media that young people listen to, watch, and read. The regions who have young advocates and spokespeople are the most successful in spreading the word about the laws, hotlines and info web sites among the 13 to 30 year old demographic. We have just started the…
UrKidsWillPay - Lovelace indicted in wife\'s death - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
"You don't get indicted on nothing." Tell that to Rick Perry or Tom Delay before him. Innocent people get indicted all the time...not that it applies in this situation or doesn't apply. We don't know the facts that were presented at the hearing and even if we knew what was presented, we don't have the benefit of those facts being challenged. The potential defendent and/or his…
HiDawnG - Abandoned baby calls to mind Safe Haven laws - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
I can't help but believe that if the mother who abandoned this little baby had known about the law, she wouldn't now be being tracked down by the police. The Baby Safe Haven law offers a safe, legal, option for a desperate parent in crisis. The law says a parent hand their unharmed baby, 30 days old or younger, to staff at a hospital, fire or police department. No questions asked. Thanks…
1950Brutus - Durbin makes fund-raising stop in Quincy - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Dick "Pee Wee" Durbin apparently doesn't see taxes as a problem - no mention of it in his statement. Maybe the problem of "jobs that don't pay enough money" would decrease if the taxes that come out of this pay are decreased.
EgoReputo - Hiding public records in Illinois now a Class 4 felony - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
"..... This law should be of special concern to public officials who are in charge of producing and maintaining public records. Clerks, recorders, finance workers, comptrollers and Freedom of Information Act, or FOIA officers are some of the primary caretakers of public records and public records requests." This new law should spell big trouble for the Quincy School District. Anybody know what's…

Most Popular

Lovelace indicted in death of first wife Updated

Indictment alleges Lovelace suffocated first wife Updated

Missing Quincy man found dead in park Updated

Committee sends new garbage and recycle trucks plan to Quincy City Council

QPD makes DUI arrest after hit and run

Durbin makes fund-raising stop in Quincy

Hiding public records in Illinois now a Class 4 felony

Rauner to make Quincy stop today

Illinois businesses concerned about losing more jobs to neighboring states

6 months, 1 week ago By Brady Cremeens, Illinois News Network

When Gov. Pat Quinn, with his talk of comeback and rebuilding, again argued for a push in the state minimum wage, he probably wasn’t thinking of Ryan Mulkey and his family restaurant’s signature Henny Penny Chicken.

But Mulkey says he’ll have fewer workers serving up those homestyle specials if the governor gets his way with a 22 percent increase to the minimum wage in Illinois, proposed last week by an optimistic Quinn during his State of the State.

"A higher minimum wage inflates the cost of everything else,” said Mulkey, the co-owner of Mulkey’s in Rock Island. “We try to pay our employees well, but requiring over $10 an hour means we either have to reduce jobs for our night workers - who are usually high school kids cleaning the kitchen and setting up tables and that sort of thing - or cut hours from our other employees."

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle expressed concern that Mulkey’s assessment is shared by other businesses and that the governor’s proposed solutions would hurt the state’s economy.

Only Nevada and Rhode Island have higher unemployment rates than Illinois, at 8.6 percent. The state is bordered by three states with unemployment ranging from 4.2 to 6.9 percent and minimum wages at $7.25 an hour. Governor Quinn's proposal would set the new minimum wage at $10, up from $8.25.

State Sen. Darrin LaHood, R-Peoria, worries that raising the minimum wage will only exacerbate the state's jobs deficiency.

"We are already a dollar above the federal minimum wage,” LaHood said. “When that was raised three years ago we lost 200,000 jobs. So there is a direct correlation to raising the minimum wage - which we're already above the national average - and job loss."

LaHood continued, "When I talk to employers and businesspeople, people are leaving the state because of these policies. They want to live and work somewhere with lower personal and business taxes, fewer regulations and a lower minimum wage, and the states around us offer that."

State Sen. John Sullivan, D-Rushville, said the minimum wage is a strong policy point for his party but is wary of the effect raising it could have on the struggling economy.

"Our unemployment in the state is stubbornly high and not coming down. I don't know that increasing the minimum wage is going to help that issue,” Sullivan said. “The minimum wage is already lower in Missouri and Iowa than it is in Illinois, and if we increase it again it's going to be even harder to keep those workers.”

State Rep. Mary Flowers, D-Chicago, doesn’t share that view, arguing that Quinn's proposal doesn't go high enough.

"If we're going to raise it, I'd rather we raised it to where it really should be: $15 or $17 an hour,” she said. “If you look at the price of everything else, it's gone up far more than the minimum wage ever has. We have single mothers working three jobs trying to make ends meet - to pay for food, gas, college, you name it - when really they should be working one job and spending more time at home with their kids.”

Flowers said that the state has an obligation to raise the wages if businesses won't do it on their own.

"It would be great if each business doubled what it paid its workers, then the workers could actually afford to purchase the same things they're selling,” she said. “But if businesses won't do it, the state has the responsibility to raise the minimum wage requirement."

State Sen. Dale Righter, R-Matoon, disagrees.

"The portrait the governor is trying to paint of what Illinois is or headed to be doesn't look very much like what people see in reality,” Righter said. “He seems to believe that you can build and sustain a middle class with minimum wage increases and government spending, and that's contrary to our experience not just here in Illinois, but across the country."

Mulkey said that a lower minimum wage would allow his restaurant to hire more people and noted an increase would hurt small businesses in particular.

"The bigger corporations can kind of grin and bear it, but in our case, it means making tough decisions about how many employees we can have and how much we can pay them,” Mulkey said. “Really, it's one of the worst ideas in a long time.”


From the Newsroom

Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 35 minutes ago

RT @quincyjournal: National Guard not involved in Lovelace legal proceedings http://t.co/GeYLa41oJS
QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 36 minutes ago

National Guard not involved in Lovelace legal proceedings http://t.co/GeYLa41oJS
QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 1 hour, 34 minutes ago

Visitors under age 12 to Blessing Hospital restricted until further notice http://t.co/CuUCs9Zd0p
QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 1 hour, 34 minutes ago

QND Football fills scheduling vacancy - Raiders will head to Florida in week nine http://t.co/UVzq469UON