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TheyRclueless - Quincy School Board votes to raise lunch prices - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Migraine....do you take all the deductions on your income tax returns that you "qualify" for? Im guessing yes, yet you are critical of others for doing the same thing. I don't disagree that maybe something is wrong with the guidelines but it is what it is and that's NOT the school system's fault. And Huggie....how do you know that no one checks what someone puts down? Im guessing…
qcstylee - New Illinois law bans employers from conducting background checks on interviewees - Quincy, IL News
People do change. If you're going to judge someone based on something they did 8 or 10 years, when they have to check the"yes" box to the question of, "Have you EVER been convicted of a felony?" Then I'm glad they're making this a law. I've been denied employment AND publicly humiliated when a potential employer looked through my application several years ago, and in front of everybody…
MrAverageGuy - Second break-in suspect identified - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
How stupid can a guy be. He just gets out of jail, and then pulls a dumb move like that. Looks like he's gonna be in and out of jail the rest of his life.
hug_a_bear - Quincy School Board votes to raise lunch prices - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Migraine it's not just morally wrong its embarrassing. I know moms that lie about their income. They stand in line at the sign up table and giggle about it. Then they skip out to there brand new SUV like its no big deal. No one checks to see if what you wrote down is correct. No pay stubs, W-2s or income tax return needed. I don't have a new car and my kids may not be in dance, but at least…
1950Brutus - Strawman: Obama\'s Right--It\'s Time to Fix the Immigration System........ - Quincy, IL News - Quinc
The system needs "fixing", in large part, because our government is not enforcing the laws on the books now. Reform will only help if the powers that be like the new law - which isn't likely since the new laws will probably be tougher than the current ones - the pendulum is swinging back the other direction. "Let everybody in" sounds good on paper but in the real world it won't work. The…

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Bill would add funeral home rules on preservation

5 months, 2 weeks ago From Associated Press

It can take days or even weeks after someone dies before the family gives instructions on what kind of service they want, funeral directors say.

Sometimes the family lives out of state and can't be reached, or family members argue over the arrangements. Meanwhile, funeral homes may hold the body without refrigerated storage, potentially allowing it to decompose and posing a public health risk.

Now an Illinois lawmaker with personal experience with the issue is proposing an unusual piece of legislation to address it.

State Rep. Dan Brady, a Bloomington Republican who's also a funeral home director and embalmer, wants to require bodies to be refrigerated or embalmed within 48 hours if funeral homes don't receive other instructions from the person in charge of arrangements.

"It's just about as far as one could hold remains without preservation," before they start to decompose, Brady said.

Brady's funeral home doesn't have refrigerated units to store bodies. In one case, a family from California couldn't be reached for three days. In the meantime, Brady turned the body over to the coroner's office to be refrigerated, adding to the funeral's price tag. Brady said this happens all across Illinois.

Brady also says the bill would protect funeral directors, from a liability standpoint. If a family couldn't be contacted, the funeral home could embalm the body without having to fear litigation if it were against the family's wishes.

The current law says funeral homes can embalm if they've made a "good faith effort" to contact families, but it says nothing about a time period.

Charles Childs, president and co-owner of A.A. Rayner and Sons in Chicago, said his funeral home has held bodies for one to two weeks while waiting for instruction from families.

"We wait the next day, the next day, and we have no contact with the family," Charles said.

His funeral home, one of the largest in the state, has refrigerated units that allow for longer storage. Some funeral homes, especially smaller ones in downstate Illinois communities, don't have refrigerated storage facilities.

Steve Knox, executive director Illinois Funeral Directors Association, said his group hasn't taken a position on the 48-hour rule because it hasn't had enough time to analyze what it would mean for the industry. But he said it's not an uncommon law among states.

Woodford County Coroner Tim Ruestman said this legislation would be good for consumers.

"It protects everybody," said Ruestman, who serves on the Illinois funeral home and embalmers advisory board.

The legislation has been sent to a House rules committee.

---

The bill is HB4202.


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