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LeroyTirebiter - GREDF supports Quincy School Building Referendum - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Why would anyone want to actually investigate something by checking facts? It is so much easier to just press "share" or "forward" and keep spreading those rumors and lies. Or for some of the "trolls" - more fun to just say outrageous things to get a reaction.
gizzard93 - Quinn, Durbin to drop in Monday for Port Authority announcement - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.co
Looks like some one is going to try to buy some more votes with our money.
ONCEMORE1 - GREDF supports Quincy School Building Referendum - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
How clever. Is that one of your classroom lessons? Teaching to vent frustrations with personal attacks?
qfingers - GREDF supports Quincy School Building Referendum - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Problem with all of these studies is a lack of strong scientific support in the conclusions. You can't control "for other variables" with any real chance of veracity. We will...on the other hand...have a small experiment here which should give a good indication of the truth of these ideas. Kids in the new schools should perform notably better (11%???) then the ones still stuck in the old ones.…
WarCry - GREDF supports Quincy School Building Referendum - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
http://www2.ed.gov/offices/OESE/archives/inits/co... "A study of the District of Columbia school system found, after controlling for other variables such as a student's socioeconomic status, that students' standardized achievement scores were lower in schools with poor building conditions.…

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Bill would add funeral home rules on preservation

8 months, 2 weeks ago From Associated Press

It can take days or even weeks after someone dies before the family gives instructions on what kind of service they want, funeral directors say.

Sometimes the family lives out of state and can't be reached, or family members argue over the arrangements. Meanwhile, funeral homes may hold the body without refrigerated storage, potentially allowing it to decompose and posing a public health risk.

Now an Illinois lawmaker with personal experience with the issue is proposing an unusual piece of legislation to address it.

State Rep. Dan Brady, a Bloomington Republican who's also a funeral home director and embalmer, wants to require bodies to be refrigerated or embalmed within 48 hours if funeral homes don't receive other instructions from the person in charge of arrangements.

"It's just about as far as one could hold remains without preservation," before they start to decompose, Brady said.

Brady's funeral home doesn't have refrigerated units to store bodies. In one case, a family from California couldn't be reached for three days. In the meantime, Brady turned the body over to the coroner's office to be refrigerated, adding to the funeral's price tag. Brady said this happens all across Illinois.

Brady also says the bill would protect funeral directors, from a liability standpoint. If a family couldn't be contacted, the funeral home could embalm the body without having to fear litigation if it were against the family's wishes.

The current law says funeral homes can embalm if they've made a "good faith effort" to contact families, but it says nothing about a time period.

Charles Childs, president and co-owner of A.A. Rayner and Sons in Chicago, said his funeral home has held bodies for one to two weeks while waiting for instruction from families.

"We wait the next day, the next day, and we have no contact with the family," Charles said.

His funeral home, one of the largest in the state, has refrigerated units that allow for longer storage. Some funeral homes, especially smaller ones in downstate Illinois communities, don't have refrigerated storage facilities.

Steve Knox, executive director Illinois Funeral Directors Association, said his group hasn't taken a position on the 48-hour rule because it hasn't had enough time to analyze what it would mean for the industry. But he said it's not an uncommon law among states.

Woodford County Coroner Tim Ruestman said this legislation would be good for consumers.

"It protects everybody," said Ruestman, who serves on the Illinois funeral home and embalmers advisory board.

The legislation has been sent to a House rules committee.

---

The bill is HB4202.


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