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DaveVictor - Quincy Park Board to interview executive director finalists - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Something tells me "might not necessarily be someone with a background in parks but it could be someone from within the community", means we've seen the next director sucking from the public teat before.
migraine_in_qcy - Abandoned baby calls to mind Safe Haven laws - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Safe Haven laws are for people who respect life. They would make no difference in this case. The kind of person who would dump a newborn in to a dumpster sees no difference between an unwanted baby and a spoiled ham sandwich. Why would they go to all the trouble of delivering the baby to the authorities, when such a simple solution is at hand? You've got the pro-abortion, "it's just a mass…
1950Brutus - Strawman: Obama Extends Another Digit...... - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
"the amount of work done and summits had on the subject of black-on-black crime" If you are not accomplishing anything then the amount of work done and summits held is WASTED time. It doesn't fit my narrative because it didn't accomplish anything.
babysafehaven - Abandoned baby calls to mind Safe Haven laws - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
The future of Baby Safe Haven law awareness is in the /hands of young people who will go out and tell their peers on all platforms of the media that young people listen to, watch, and read. The regions who have young advocates and spokespeople are the most successful in spreading the word about the laws, hotlines and info web sites among the 13 to 30 year old demographic. We have just started the…
UrKidsWillPay - Lovelace indicted in wife\'s death - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
"You don't get indicted on nothing." Tell that to Rick Perry or Tom Delay before him. Innocent people get indicted all the time...not that it applies in this situation or doesn't apply. We don't know the facts that were presented at the hearing and even if we knew what was presented, we don't have the benefit of those facts being challenged. The potential defendent and/or his…

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Bill would add funeral home rules on preservation

6 months, 3 weeks ago From Associated Press

It can take days or even weeks after someone dies before the family gives instructions on what kind of service they want, funeral directors say.

Sometimes the family lives out of state and can't be reached, or family members argue over the arrangements. Meanwhile, funeral homes may hold the body without refrigerated storage, potentially allowing it to decompose and posing a public health risk.

Now an Illinois lawmaker with personal experience with the issue is proposing an unusual piece of legislation to address it.

State Rep. Dan Brady, a Bloomington Republican who's also a funeral home director and embalmer, wants to require bodies to be refrigerated or embalmed within 48 hours if funeral homes don't receive other instructions from the person in charge of arrangements.

"It's just about as far as one could hold remains without preservation," before they start to decompose, Brady said.

Brady's funeral home doesn't have refrigerated units to store bodies. In one case, a family from California couldn't be reached for three days. In the meantime, Brady turned the body over to the coroner's office to be refrigerated, adding to the funeral's price tag. Brady said this happens all across Illinois.

Brady also says the bill would protect funeral directors, from a liability standpoint. If a family couldn't be contacted, the funeral home could embalm the body without having to fear litigation if it were against the family's wishes.

The current law says funeral homes can embalm if they've made a "good faith effort" to contact families, but it says nothing about a time period.

Charles Childs, president and co-owner of A.A. Rayner and Sons in Chicago, said his funeral home has held bodies for one to two weeks while waiting for instruction from families.

"We wait the next day, the next day, and we have no contact with the family," Charles said.

His funeral home, one of the largest in the state, has refrigerated units that allow for longer storage. Some funeral homes, especially smaller ones in downstate Illinois communities, don't have refrigerated storage facilities.

Steve Knox, executive director Illinois Funeral Directors Association, said his group hasn't taken a position on the 48-hour rule because it hasn't had enough time to analyze what it would mean for the industry. But he said it's not an uncommon law among states.

Woodford County Coroner Tim Ruestman said this legislation would be good for consumers.

"It protects everybody," said Ruestman, who serves on the Illinois funeral home and embalmers advisory board.

The legislation has been sent to a House rules committee.

---

The bill is HB4202.


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