Wednesday, Oct 22, 2014
Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Trending on the Journal

Related Headlines

Illinois releases 5-year economic blueprint

Senators propose 12-cent federal gas tax increase

Petroleum Marketers, C-Stores, fight proposed Illinois gas tax hikes Updated

Business leaders pushing for Illinois gas tax increase

Dillard wants to cut state gas tax

Recent Comments

qcity05 - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
8 million dollars in over run cost is built into the 89 million. That was discussed at the meeting too. So, really it's 81 million. If it's under, it's under, but it won't go over. I disagree that the new schools won't last as long. Architects are committed to building quality structures, not like Ellington and Monroe which were designed to be temporary, both of which are almost…
Hinkdad - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
By your own logic, would a positive effect on the teachers not have a positive effect on the students? It's all cause and effect and Newton's 3rd law. I could quote and reference many sources which could then be rebutted by your own, I'll leave the Googling up to you, I have better ways to spend my time. Something we all seem to agree on is that there is an issue and the current structure…
CoolEdge - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Perhaps UKWP is trying to equate military service with "on the teat" teaching jobs. Of course there are many big differences, especially for military that are deployed, which is part of the job. There are indeed many public school teachers that see their unionized, teaching monopoly, "part time" job as a public service that demands the same respect as our military. Not many retire with PTSD, or…
db1998 - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
how do i get a sign for my yard?
qfingers - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
And you're making the opposite mistake....saying that each thing, when added together, becomes a total justification. That's not how you justify expenditures. You have to make the case for EACH item in it's own right. And you do that compared to what it would cost to fix it in place...assuming you do have to fix it...which apparently we don't...because it hasn't been done.…

Most Popular

Authorities make meth bust on Madison

Chief Copley on Fox News

City of Quincy considering health clinic for employees

Adams Co. Divorces for 10/17

Nursing unions call for better Ebola preparedness

School Board to outline plans for savings, old buildings if referendum passes

Quincy Park District tumbling program provides children intro to gymnastics

Tournear Promoted to JWCC Nursing Admin Chair

Idea to cut Illinois gas tax picks up steam

8 months, 2 weeks ago by Jen Greene, Illinois News Network

The high cost per gallon has some gubernatorial hopefuls calling for cutting taxes on petroleum

Illinois has one of the highest taxes on gasoline in the country, something every Illinois motorist is acutely aware of when filling up at the pump. 

The high cost per gallon has some gubernatorial hopefuls calling for cutting taxes on petroleum. Two candidates for the GOP nomination say they would go after the sales tax on gas. 

Illinois is one of seven states that levies a sales tax on gas in addition to a gasoline tax.

 “We have very, very high taxes. We have taxes on top of taxes,” says Beth Moser, Illinois public affairs director for the American Automobile Association.

 The average cost of a gallon of regular gasoline in Illinois on Jan. 31, including state, federal and sales tax, was $3.37, according to AAA. 

 On the same date the average prices in neighboring states were:

 

  • Missouri: $3.03
  • Iowa: $3.25
  • Kentucky: $3.25
  • Indiana: $3.25
  • Wisconsin: $3.26

 

 These figures do not include county and city taxes which are piled on top of the state and federal taxes. For example, in Chicago the price of a gallon of gas include a federal tax of 18.4 cents per gallon, a state tax, a county tax, a city tax and a state environmental tax.

 Here’s what that looks like when you add all those levies together, in Illinois and its neighbors, as tracked by the American Petroleum Institute:

 Illinois (on average): 57.5 cents

Missouri: 35.7 cents

Iowa:  40.4 cents

Kentucky: 49.2 cents

Indiana: 57.09 cents

Wisconsin: 51.3 cents

  Illinois’ sales tax, since it’s percentage-based, goes up with prices, as opposed to the flat tax, which is based on the number of gallons purchased.

 Opponents of the current gasoline tax structure say the increased price in the Land of Lincoln hurts the state’s economy because it encourages Illinois motorists in border regions to fill up in neighboring states.

 On Jan. 31, the average cost of gas in Chicago was $3.80, 50 cents more expensive than the $3.30 that can be found in neighboring Hammond, Ind., a half-hour away.

 And in Quincy, Ill., on the eastern bank of the Mississippi River, gas costs about 25 to 30 cents more than it does in West Quincy, Mo., said Carl Adams, Vice President of Illinois’ Ayers Oil Company in Quincy. West Quincy has no permanent residents and is comprised mostly of convenience stores.

 “If you were to come to West Quincy, Mo. I would show you the license plates. They’re all Illinois licenses,” Adams said. 

Bill Fleishli, vice president of Illinois Petroleum Marketers Association, noted that Illinois taxes food and medicine at a lower rate because of their essential need for living.

 “I think those same arguments can be made for sales tax on gasoline to be removed,” he said.

 “People have to be more mobile to go to work, people have to be mobile to go to school, people have to be more mobile to be re-educated for new jobs, and the expense of gasoline could be reduced by 25 to 30 cents [per gallon] in Illinois. I think that would be a great tax relief,” Fleishli said.

 So where do the gubernatorial candidates stand on the issue?

 

  • State Sen. Kirk Dillard, R-Hinsdale, wants to cut the sales tax by 70%.
  • State Sen. Bill Brady, R-Bloomington, has called for eliminating the sales tax.
  • Bruce Rauner and Dan Rutherford declined to address whether they would support a cut to the tax on gas when asked by a reporter.

 

Gov. Pat Quinn’s office did not respond to repeated inquiries from Illinois News Network.


From the Newsroom

Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 2 hours, 41 minutes ago

RT @phil_rosenthal: Chicago media story of the year MT @RobertFeder Tribune Publishing buying all Sun-Times suburban newspapers: http://t.c…
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 3 hours, 4 minutes ago

@MaggieStrong @mooreforquincy I've seen your budget. It could fit. :)
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 3 hours, 18 minutes ago

RT @brianstelter: Why @Dish subscribers can't see @CNN today: http://t.co/mdobOr0mwp