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WmMunny - New Illinois law bans employers from conducting background checks on interviewees - Quincy, IL News
Well, I stand corrected now that I realize how important and successful you've been throughout your career. ;>) If you'll come down to earth some you may find that we small locally owned companies with say ...... 15 or fewer employees ...... don't have the luxury of certain resources to make interviews and such a cheap venture. Our time is big money to many of us and wasting those…
migraine_in_qcy - New Illinois law bans employers from conducting background checks on interviewees - Quincy, IL News
No, these days we start with Google search and Facebook to find out everything we can about a prospect. Then we interview, and only once we've identified someone as a potential new-hire, we have them fill out an app and do a background check.
migraine_in_qcy - Schoenakase on WTAD\'s Mary Griffith Show - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Although in principle I am against the laws that he was violating, the fact remains that even after being told to stop, he did not. It wasn't really all that long ago that he was willfully breaking the law. That doesn't speak well to his honesty or character. Oh, and those supposed many people who want to vote but can't get to a polling place? Bull. If you want to vote, you'll…
LNeck2012 - Schoenakase on WTAD\'s Mary Griffith Show - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
I can't find anything about a school. I have asked around over the past few days and was told Webster School. Some thought the caller meant the JCPenny building. Either way, doesn't sound like someone that needs to be in a place with important documents.
QuincyJournal - Schoenakase on WTAD\'s Mary Griffith Show - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
His crimes have been well documented in the local media. Look it up. BG

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Export prices rose slightly in December, import prices were stable

6 months, 1 week ago Lauren Larson, MEDILL Reports

Cautious optimism was expressed about the export numbers

From Lauren Larson, MEDILL Reports:

U.S. import prices remained flat in December, while export prices rose slightly, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Tuesday.

Overall import prices for fuel declined 0.6 percent in October and 0.9 percent in November. But prices did not fall in December due to a 0.4 percent increase in the fuel import price, which includes petroleum and natural gas.

Imported petroleum prices did drop slightly in December, but that slide was neutralized by a large increase in imported natural gas prices, which is not uncommon in colder months.

Meanwhile, export prices rose 0.4 percent in December due, in part, to a 4.5 percent increase in soybean prices. The Bureau of Labor Statistics did note in its release that wheat and vegetable export prices were down slightly in December.

Joel Naroff, president and founder of Holland, Penn.-based Naroff Economic Advisors Inc., expressed cautious optimism about the export numbers. “Overall, if you’re looking at the non-food, non-fuel prices, the export prices have stabilized, ” he said.

Naroff added, “The agricultural numbers are crazy these days.”

Naroff pointed out that dramatic fluctuation in agriculture exports is common, and the 0.4 percent hike in agricultural exports follows several months of uncertainty. Agricultural exports slid 1.3 percent in October and 0.2 percent in November.

On Sunday, Gov. Pat Quinn congratulated Illinois soybean farms for producing the largest soybean crop in the nation.

December’s higher overall export prices are still down 1.0 percent decrease from December 2012, in part because agriculture prices have experienced a 6.3 percent drop since then.

Barring chaos in the agricultural sector, Naroff said he does not foresee any sweeping changes in import and export prices in coming months. “I don’t think we’ll see a lot of increases outside of petroleum-based industry,” Naroff said, “but who knows?”

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