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Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn to sign 'Ban the Box' legislation requiring

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Givemeliberty - Raw milk industry draws attention from Illinois regulators - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
With everything we have going on in this state and they are on a raw milk kick? Americans have been buying and selling farm produce at the local level for centuries, just leave it alone. Why do they always have to step in and put their grubby little paws on every frickin thing we do? I am a consumer of raw milk, and I am capable of nourishing my own body, leave me and my farmer alone and do something…
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So does that mean your okay with a lying adulterer, accused of sexual assault, disbarred lawyer, lying, impeached ex-president?
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So true and its usually the voters that make me want to pull my hair out not the politicians. The dem voters have always been upset about corporate welfare/ favoritism, and sending jobs over seas until Obama got elected. Not long after he was elected the Republicans became concerned with the Patriot Act, and hawks on our privacy. The majority of voters talk and act like they have issues they care…
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#1. The board, from what I understand, has basically stated that impact on property taxes should be negligible. That is mostly because of the huge decrease in Life safety bonds that have to be issued. and the expiring existing school bonds, and net savings from operating new "energy star" buildings". You have to understand that Life Safety bonds can be issued with out tax payer approval. These…
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What would you propose they do with the QAVTC in that case? They teach more than just the high school students there, you know.

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New Illinois law bans employers from conducting background checks before interviews

New Illinois law bans employers from conducting background checks before interviews

2 months, 3 weeks ago by Brady Cremeens, Illinois News Network

Employers in Illinois can no longer access criminal background checks on potential hires until after an interview is conducted.

Gov. Quinn signed into law this week a bill that prohibits private employers from asking applicants about their criminal history prior to determining if they are qualified for the job.

“Everyone deserves a second chance when it comes to getting a job,” Governor Quinn said in a press release. “This law will help ensure that people across Illinois get a fair shot to reach their full potential through their skills and qualifications, rather than past history. It will also help reduce recidivism, fight poverty and prevent violence in our communities by putting more people back to work.”

The governor’s action is, according to his statement, an effort to “ensure all Illinois’ workers are treated fairly,” and follows last year’s executive order stipulating the same consideration for applicants for state employment.

The Job Opportunities for Qualified Applicants Act, also referred to as the “ban the box” bill in reference to the box on many application forms asking applicants if they are a convicted criminal, makes Illinois the fifth state to restrict pre-interview criminal background checks.

Jay Shattuck is the executive director of the Illinois Chamber of Commerce Employment Law Council, and says while the bill does create a bit of a burden for employers, it’s a reasonable attempt to give some applicants who would otherwise be ignored a chance.

“A lot of times an employer may consider an individual who was convicted of a crime many years ago but who are otherwise qualified and have a gone straight since,” Shattuck said. “This gives the applicants who do receive an interview a chance to explain what happened and make their case for being hired.”

Making it to the interview process may be the extra opportunity these former criminals need to get back on their feet, according to Shattuck, even if it means some extra work for employers.

“It does add a little bit of a burden to employers looking to fill a vacancy,” Shattuck said. “If they can’t automatically look at the box and throw out applications from ex-cons, they’ll have to do more work and take more time when choosing who to interview. They’ve lost the ability to weed out the applicant list by that one box.”

The new rule only pertains to businesses with more than 15 employees on the payroll.

State Sen. Dale Syverson, R – Rockford, disagrees with the intent of the legislation, and says it will just create more work for employers and lead potential employees on.

“Many companies already have rules in place,” Syverson said. “This isn’t going to cause them to change their rules, but it will cause them to have to go through a lot more interviews to hire or not hire the same people they were going to anyway.”

Syverson argued that companies should have the freedom to determine their hiring rules and procedures on their own.

“By allowing applicants to undergo the interview process without being judged as unfit for employment because of their background, we will help individuals get back to work, pursue a higher education and become the responsible residents that our state thrives on,” State Rep. Rita Mayfield, D-Waukegan, said in a statement. “I believe this legislation will improve the lives of many residents and give them the opportunities they were previously unable to strive for.”

Waukegan sponsored the bill in the House, while State Sen. Antonio Muñoz, D-Chicago, was the primary Senate sponsor.

“Everyone should have the opportunity to be considered for employment,” Sen. Munoz said in a press release. “This legislation protects people with criminal records from discrimination, gives deserving people a second chance and allows them to be evaluated based on their suitability for a position.”

Gov. Quinn’s office said in a statement that this move is part of a broader agenda to “give people of all ages a second chance in life.” The office cited recent legislation signed by the governor that automatically clears arrest records for less serious, non-violent juvenile cases, and legislation that increases the number of felonies that are legally sealed and inaccessible without the court meeting strict criteria.

The legislation does not apply to jobs where employers are legally obligated to exclude applicants with criminal history, and therefore exempts some construction jobs, emergency medical jobs and security jobs.

The law takes effect January 1, 2015.


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