Thursday, Oct 2, 2014
Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Trending on the Journal

Related Headlines

Quincy School Board gets first look at $70.3 million budget

Recent Comments

qfingers - Mayor Moore discusses Newcomb proposal - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
It's not tax abatement...it's a tax refund which is a financing tool. And there's lots more than what is listed on your link It's a rather long section of 65 ILCS 5/11-74 http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?Ac...
Givemeliberty - Iowa company pitches Newcomb development proposal - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
The pill Hobart is wanting the city to take would be easier to swallow, if they were bringing American Family, AT&T, Motorola, or something like it to fill up this building with 300-400 Jobs. Sadly though projects like the one I just described or the Newcome Lofts will only come to this area with help from the City or County (not saying the city should give in to all of Hobarts demands) because the…
UrKidsWillPay - Mayor Moore discusses Newcomb proposal - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
The TIF district does not include a Property Tax abatement. Those are features of the Enterprise Zone which this site is not a part of. Would like to know how we are going to force that one through against our rules.....not that I doubt they will do it. Take a look at the eligible TIF expenses and tell me where they are going to lie to us to classify 1.8 million of a 4 million project as TIF eligible.…
UrKidsWillPay - Quincy Police Blotter for September 30, 2014 - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Could be or it could be for a burnout. which could be defined as unsafe because you lack complete traction. Or it could be for accelerating too fast but not buring the tires and without going over the speed limit. or she could have exited a private drive like the bowling alley without properly yielding.
qfingers - Mayor Moore discusses Newcomb proposal - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Just remember that getting taxable property there doesn't bring in any extra $$ for the city. What it does is lower property taxes for the rest of us. Obviously more $$ back for more expensive properties (i.e. same % saved across the board). By the same token the TIF district raises our taxes until such time as the TIF expires. That's because some of the tax $$ are diverted to a special…

Most Popular

Study finds reasons Springfield Diocese Catholics have left the Church

Inquest and Investigation: Curtis Lovelace didn't call 911 immediately or attempt CPR on wife Updated

Iowa company pitches Newcomb development proposal

Practice of end-of-career teacher salary bumps being scrutinized

Mayor Moore discusses Newcomb proposal Video

Lovelace pleads Not Guilty

JWCC to Hold Manufacturing Expo October 3

Jimmy John's customer data hacked

New school construction costs could rise with newly mandated storm shelters

3 months, 3 weeks ago By Jackson Adams, Illinois News Network

Existing buildings not affected, but costs of new buildings could increase by at least 25 percent; Governor expected to sign legislation

A bill passed the Illinois Senate that will require all new school buildings built in Illinois to include storm shelters that can withstand a force four tornado.

The bill, HB 2513, passed the Illinois Senate 43 to 13. It now waits for the Governor’s signature to become law. Illinois State Rep. Jil Tracy (R-Quincy) and State Sen. John Sullivan (D-Rushville) both voted for the legislation.

This law comes just as the Quincy School District is in the process of planning on how to proceed with new construction for its schools. A select committee is meeting privately and Quincy architectural firms are being paid around $250,000 to be part of the committee and come up with a master plan. The Quincy School Board also must decide when to ask voters for a referendum to fund the multi-million dollar project.

Some Republicans explained that they were not against schools having adequate shelter in schools, but they were against unfunded mandates.

State Sen. Dale Righter, R-Mattoon, said his opposition was out of principle.

“We have debated in different committees and on the Senate floor for years on the issue of unfunded mandates,” he said. “I’ll bet there is not a single member of this chamber, Republican or Democrat, upstate or downstate who hasn’t been back home and said, ‘I’m opposed to unfunded mandates. I’m opposed to Springfield telling you what to do and then not sending any money in order to do it’… this is an unfunded mandate.”

Other opponents to the legislation highlighted that the mandate did in fact come with hefty additional costs.

“The costs don’t sound big when you say 20 or 30 cents per foot, but the reality is these requirements could end up costing up to a million dollars,” said state Sen. Kyle McCarter, R-Lebanon. “If a school is in an area of high risk, they are welcome to do this at any time.”

Quincy School District Business Manager Joel Murphy said the committee has been made aware of the new law and its potential impact.

Proponents of the bill said it was only common sense and a desire to protect children that motivated them.

“I understand the word mandate is a scary word, but they are not always bad, especially when it comes to school safety,” replied state Sen. Bertino-Tarrant, D-Shorewood. “To have an area that teachers can go to without a second thought I think is very critical.”

“This is about life and death,” said state Sen. William Delgado, D-Chicago, “This is about strengthening the walls so they don’t collapse in on our loved ones. That’s a mandate I can live with.”

State Sen. David Koehler, D-Peoria, the bill’s sponsor in the Senate, explained that the bill only took effect if the building had 10 classrooms or more and would not impact older buildings that received upgrades, or buildings that did not house children.

“The change is in our mindset of doing things a little more consciously so we’ll be able to provide decent protection for our children and students,” insisted Koehler, the sponsor of the bill in the Senate.

Koehler added that the American Institute of Architects supported the legislation.

“One of the safest places in most communities is the school,” said state Sen. David Leuchtefeld, R-Okawville, a former school teacher and basketball coach. “There are a lot of areas that you can get  to, like hallways and so on and they certainly go through drill after drill to be as safe as possible… this would come at really great expense. I understand that these standards would require the ability to withstand 250 mile per hour wind. That’s really rare.”


From the Newsroom

Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 14 hours, 6 minutes ago

@jazayerli Vargas over Duffy?
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 14 hours, 11 minutes ago

Vargas over Duffy for KC in Game 1 of the ALDS? #thatssoNed
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 14 hours, 47 minutes ago

RT @ryangerding74: @QuincyBob could u help promote our auction https://t.co/SapAVvO4Ni
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 15 hours, 7 minutes ago

RT @VonniMediaMogul: LOL RT @BenJealous: Eric Holder has held the office of Attorney General with courage, vision and dignity. History will…