Tuesday, Oct 21, 2014
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Quincy School Board gets first look at $70.3 million budget

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qcity05 - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
8 million dollars in over run cost is built into the 89 million. That was discussed at the meeting too. So, really it's 81 million. If it's under, it's under, but it won't go over. I disagree that the new schools won't last as long. Architects are committed to building quality structures, not like Ellington and Monroe which were designed to be temporary, both of which are almost…
Hinkdad - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
By your own logic, would a positive effect on the teachers not have a positive effect on the students? It's all cause and effect and Newton's 3rd law. I could quote and reference many sources which could then be rebutted by your own, I'll leave the Googling up to you, I have better ways to spend my time. Something we all seem to agree on is that there is an issue and the current structure…
CoolEdge - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Perhaps UKWP is trying to equate military service with "on the teat" teaching jobs. Of course there are many big differences, especially for military that are deployed, which is part of the job. There are indeed many public school teachers that see their unionized, teaching monopoly, "part time" job as a public service that demands the same respect as our military. Not many retire with PTSD, or…
db1998 - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
how do i get a sign for my yard?
qfingers - REBEL MEDIA: So I have a sign in my yard - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
And you're making the opposite mistake....saying that each thing, when added together, becomes a total justification. That's not how you justify expenditures. You have to make the case for EACH item in it's own right. And you do that compared to what it would cost to fix it in place...assuming you do have to fix it...which apparently we don't...because it hasn't been done.…

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New school construction costs could rise with newly mandated storm shelters

4 months, 1 week ago By Jackson Adams, Illinois News Network

Existing buildings not affected, but costs of new buildings could increase by at least 25 percent; Governor expected to sign legislation

A bill passed the Illinois Senate that will require all new school buildings built in Illinois to include storm shelters that can withstand a force four tornado.

The bill, HB 2513, passed the Illinois Senate 43 to 13. It now waits for the Governor’s signature to become law. Illinois State Rep. Jil Tracy (R-Quincy) and State Sen. John Sullivan (D-Rushville) both voted for the legislation.

This law comes just as the Quincy School District is in the process of planning on how to proceed with new construction for its schools. A select committee is meeting privately and Quincy architectural firms are being paid around $250,000 to be part of the committee and come up with a master plan. The Quincy School Board also must decide when to ask voters for a referendum to fund the multi-million dollar project.

Some Republicans explained that they were not against schools having adequate shelter in schools, but they were against unfunded mandates.

State Sen. Dale Righter, R-Mattoon, said his opposition was out of principle.

“We have debated in different committees and on the Senate floor for years on the issue of unfunded mandates,” he said. “I’ll bet there is not a single member of this chamber, Republican or Democrat, upstate or downstate who hasn’t been back home and said, ‘I’m opposed to unfunded mandates. I’m opposed to Springfield telling you what to do and then not sending any money in order to do it’… this is an unfunded mandate.”

Other opponents to the legislation highlighted that the mandate did in fact come with hefty additional costs.

“The costs don’t sound big when you say 20 or 30 cents per foot, but the reality is these requirements could end up costing up to a million dollars,” said state Sen. Kyle McCarter, R-Lebanon. “If a school is in an area of high risk, they are welcome to do this at any time.”

Quincy School District Business Manager Joel Murphy said the committee has been made aware of the new law and its potential impact.

Proponents of the bill said it was only common sense and a desire to protect children that motivated them.

“I understand the word mandate is a scary word, but they are not always bad, especially when it comes to school safety,” replied state Sen. Bertino-Tarrant, D-Shorewood. “To have an area that teachers can go to without a second thought I think is very critical.”

“This is about life and death,” said state Sen. William Delgado, D-Chicago, “This is about strengthening the walls so they don’t collapse in on our loved ones. That’s a mandate I can live with.”

State Sen. David Koehler, D-Peoria, the bill’s sponsor in the Senate, explained that the bill only took effect if the building had 10 classrooms or more and would not impact older buildings that received upgrades, or buildings that did not house children.

“The change is in our mindset of doing things a little more consciously so we’ll be able to provide decent protection for our children and students,” insisted Koehler, the sponsor of the bill in the Senate.

Koehler added that the American Institute of Architects supported the legislation.

“One of the safest places in most communities is the school,” said state Sen. David Leuchtefeld, R-Okawville, a former school teacher and basketball coach. “There are a lot of areas that you can get  to, like hallways and so on and they certainly go through drill after drill to be as safe as possible… this would come at really great expense. I understand that these standards would require the ability to withstand 250 mile per hour wind. That’s really rare.”


From the Newsroom

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Bob Gough 2 hours, 41 minutes ago

RT @phil_rosenthal: Chicago media story of the year MT @RobertFeder Tribune Publishing buying all Sun-Times suburban newspapers: http://t.c…
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 3 hours, 4 minutes ago

@MaggieStrong @mooreforquincy I've seen your budget. It could fit. :)
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 3 hours, 18 minutes ago

RT @brianstelter: Why @Dish subscribers can't see @CNN today: http://t.co/mdobOr0mwp