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jannie122 - Updated: Illinois Tobacco Quitline closes amid grant suspensions - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.c
I am surprised that this money could be used for something else as I thought it was received by states from the Cigeratte companies in a class action court settlement of money for the states to use to encourage people to stop smoking or to encourage people to not smoke.
jannie122 - Study: EPA Global Warming Rule To Kill Nearly 300,000 Jobs - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Not only should we be concerned about the jobs, we should also be concerned about the unreliable nature of "green" energy. The money we (government) have given away to solar and wind we could have "given" in the form of subsidies to develop scrubbers on coal plants. Coal, cheap, efficient, and abundant. With all of the green energy we will see our electric bills raise - all one has to do is look to…
UJacks1 - Walden to retire - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
May I be so bold to nominate Barack O'bama ? Illinoisian, experienced lawyer, liberal to the max.
UrKidsWillPay - Local 63 approves contract - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Okay fine, have it your way. Instead of offering them a pay cut a another five years with the golden goose I would just stop all negotiations with them and sim
at_ease - Local 63 approves contract - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
WarCry- I believe that the city had the opportunity a year ago to give the firefighters a much lower pay increase and voted it down. If money is the real issue here why would they now give them such a good contract. Also, is it fair to close one station to save money? Shouldn't the people in that area be the ones to receive the tax break since they won't have the service any more? "By…

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Half in Illinois and Connecticut want to move elsewhere

Half in Illinois and Connecticut want to move elsewhere

11 months, 2 weeks ago Lydia Saad, Gallup Economy

Montana, Hawaii, Maine boast lowest rate of residents wanting to leave

From Lydia Saad, Gallup Economy:

Every state has at least some residents who are looking for greener pastures, but nowhere is the desire to move more prevalent than in Illinois and Connecticut. In both of these states, about half of residents say that if given the chance to move to a different state, they would like to do so. Maryland is a close third, at 47%. By contrast, in Montana, Hawaii, and Maine, just 23% say they would like to relocate. Nearly as few -- 24% -- feel this way in Oregon, New Hampshire, and Texas.

These findings are from a 50-state Gallup poll, conducted June-December 2013, which includes at least 600 representative interviews with residents aged 18 and older in each state. Gallup measured residents' interest in moving out of state by asking, "Regardless of whether you will move, if you had the opportunity, would you like to move to another state, or would you rather remain in your current state?"

Thirty-three percent of residents want to move to another state, according to the average of the 50 state responses. Seventeen states come close to that 50-state average. Another 16 are above the average range, including three showing an especially high desire to move. In fact, in these three -- Illinois, Connecticut, and Maryland -- roughly as many residents want to leave as want to stay.

At the other end of the spectrum, 17 states are home to a below-average percentage of residents wanting to leave. This includes the previously mentioned six states -- Montana, Hawaii, Maine, Oregon, New Hampshire, and Texas -- where fewer than one in four want to move, the lowest level recorded. The detailed results for all 50 states are shown on page 2.

In the same poll, Gallup asked state residents how likely it is they will move in the next 12 months. On average across all 50 states, 6% of state residents say it is extremely or very likely they will move in the next year, 8% say it is somewhat likely, 14% not too likely, and 73% not likely at all.

The combined percentages reporting they are extremely, very, or somewhat likely to move out of state ranges from 8% in Maine, Iowa, and Vermont to 20% in Nevada. Although these figures are still high relative to the actual percentage of Americans who move out of state each year, they provide a basis for evaluating each state's risk of losing population that is somewhat stronger than the sheer desire of its residents to move.

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