Wednesday, Jul 30, 2014
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Stupid_Dems - City of Quincy to spend $342,000 on road salt - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Difference is transportation cost
luanjo3 - Fast food workers vow civil disobedience - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
There is all kinds of assistance already out there for the single mothers that you speak of, and they take full advantage of it. I've heard of single mothers getting so much financial aid to go back to school that they have money left over. Then they drop out because hey, they didn't have to pay for it. Single moms who get so much EITC on their tax returns that they can go out and get…
pjohnf - White House Pressed to Keep RFS, Biodiesel Industries Strong - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Franken and Senator just seem to me to be oxymoronic, they just don't go together.
gizzard93 - City of Quincy to spend $342,000 on road salt - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
sounds like double talk to me.
SeenTheLight1 - City of Quincy to spend $342,000 on road salt - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Never heard of such a thing. Cities and counties along with townships submit their request, then CMS uses that total for their RFP. If a supplier cannot meet that total then I would guess some could be left off the RFP total, but have never heard of that. The other comment states " bids range from $70 to $140 per ton" so why is Quincy paying $95 per ton? Still I have never heard of CMS cutting off…

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Half in Illinois and Connecticut want to move elsewhere

Half in Illinois and Connecticut want to move elsewhere

2 months, 4 weeks ago Lydia Saad, Gallup Economy

Montana, Hawaii, Maine boast lowest rate of residents wanting to leave

From Lydia Saad, Gallup Economy:

Every state has at least some residents who are looking for greener pastures, but nowhere is the desire to move more prevalent than in Illinois and Connecticut. In both of these states, about half of residents say that if given the chance to move to a different state, they would like to do so. Maryland is a close third, at 47%. By contrast, in Montana, Hawaii, and Maine, just 23% say they would like to relocate. Nearly as few -- 24% -- feel this way in Oregon, New Hampshire, and Texas.

These findings are from a 50-state Gallup poll, conducted June-December 2013, which includes at least 600 representative interviews with residents aged 18 and older in each state. Gallup measured residents' interest in moving out of state by asking, "Regardless of whether you will move, if you had the opportunity, would you like to move to another state, or would you rather remain in your current state?"

Thirty-three percent of residents want to move to another state, according to the average of the 50 state responses. Seventeen states come close to that 50-state average. Another 16 are above the average range, including three showing an especially high desire to move. In fact, in these three -- Illinois, Connecticut, and Maryland -- roughly as many residents want to leave as want to stay.

At the other end of the spectrum, 17 states are home to a below-average percentage of residents wanting to leave. This includes the previously mentioned six states -- Montana, Hawaii, Maine, Oregon, New Hampshire, and Texas -- where fewer than one in four want to move, the lowest level recorded. The detailed results for all 50 states are shown on page 2.

In the same poll, Gallup asked state residents how likely it is they will move in the next 12 months. On average across all 50 states, 6% of state residents say it is extremely or very likely they will move in the next year, 8% say it is somewhat likely, 14% not too likely, and 73% not likely at all.

The combined percentages reporting they are extremely, very, or somewhat likely to move out of state ranges from 8% in Maine, Iowa, and Vermont to 20% in Nevada. Although these figures are still high relative to the actual percentage of Americans who move out of state each year, they provide a basis for evaluating each state's risk of losing population that is somewhat stronger than the sheer desire of its residents to move.

Click Here to Read Full Article


From the Newsroom

Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 2 hours, 5 minutes ago

@keithcleer HAHAHA!
QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 2 hours, 47 minutes ago

Sheriff reveals attempted jailbreak - Three men tried to escape Sunday http://t.co/zh0b95aGYR
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 3 hours, 10 minutes ago

@KeeneMLB Me too.
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 3 hours, 13 minutes ago

aaaand...On cue, Cards fans bemoaning giving up Ramsey for Masterson. #goodlordpeople