Friday, May 22, 2015
Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com

Related Headlines

Illinois taxpayers paying billions to ‘manage’ debt

Ill. GOP, Democrats have a long history of redistricting

Winter storm proves Illinois has plenty of ‘non-essential’ government workers

Companies can’t lose, but can Illinois taxpayers ever win with incentives?

Illinois remap reform is gaining steam

Recent Comments

GuyFawkes10 - LaHood / Flynn debates in question - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Cordell, Do you think any of his policies are working? If so, which ones?
UrKidsWillPay - National Study Quantifies Impact of Salvation Army Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Centers, Unders
I believe if you check, you will find that Property Developers are required by City Code to put in sidewalks at their expense unless they get a waiver from that part of the code. Once the sidewalks are in, they become the city's responsibility to maintain.
ONCEMORE1 - National Study Quantifies Impact of Salvation Army Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Centers, Unders
Does anyone else remember that much (most?) of the land the Kroc Center now occupies was formerly Salvation Army property and thus exempt from taxation all along? That would seem to mitigate some of the tax issues some on here are so jacked up about. If I am in error, I welcome correction and/or dissenting opinions.
DaveVictor - LaHood / Flynn debates in question - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Well, you're too sharp for me. I was just trying to relieve that longing. I know how much that can hurt.
qfingers - National Study Quantifies Impact of Salvation Army Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Centers, Unders
Well that guy asked for a gift of money to build his building. So yeah, many objected. The city proposed making it a loan and he backed out. To the best of my knowledge the Kroc center never asked for a thing. It's the city that put proposed putting in the sidewalks since they own that part of the property...just like they own the sidewalks in all the city right of way. Now...since sidewalks…

Most Popular

Quincy School Board to re-bid QHS construction

Local McDonalds changing hands QJ Original

Criders in court

National Study Quantifies Impact of Kroc Centers

Amtrak Train Possibly Hit Before Wreck

Real Estate Transfers May 11 thru May 15

Paid Ferguson protesters still waiting for the check

City to re-finance ’05 bonds

Illinois voters want to take drawing political maps out of politicians’ hands

Illinois voters want to take drawing political maps out of politicians’ hands

1 year ago by Ben Yount, Illinois Watchdog

Group has collected nearly 500,000 signatures to get a new redistricting process placed on the November ballot

Voters in Illinois who don’t want politicians to draw the state’s political maps are one step away from putting the question up for a vote.

Unfortunately, that step means letting Illinois’ political machines whack at their reform attempts.

“We anticipate a lot of scrutiny,” Mike Kolenc, the campaign manager for Yes for Independent Maps, told Illinois Watchdog. “This a lot of power that the status quo would be giving up. We expect a robust challenge to our signatures, and we’re ready for that.”

His group has collected nearly 500,000 signatures to get a new redistricting process placed on the November ballot, well more than the 298,000 needed.

If Kolenc and his group get their way, voters will decide if a computer should be given the job of drawing Illinois’ political boundaries, or if lawmakers will continue to draw lines that benefit them.

“This is not about pointing out which districts are drawn incorrectly. This is about putting in place an independent process that is transparent, drawing maps with non-partisan criteria,” Kolenc added.

Illinois uses a commission made up of five Democrats and five Republicans to draw its political map once every decade. A drawing determines the eleventh member, and thereby decides whether Democrats or Republicans will control the redistricting process.

“Drawing a name out of Abraham Lincoln’s stovepipe hat,” Kolenc said.

He said, in effect, the process allows lawmakers to choose their voters and not the other way around.

Illinois went to the commission map process after ignoring political maps for decades.

David Morrison, deputy director of the Illinois Campaign for Political Reform, said Illinois voters approved the commission and lawmakers quickly started to use it to their advantage.

“The maps comply with the constitutional requirements that they be substantially equal in population and contiguous and such, but the maps also have the added feature of magnifying the political power of the party that drew them,” Morrison said. “That outcome was not intended, and of course runs counter to the goal of holding free elections for public office.”

But the powers that be are dismissing the push for a new process as simply the whining of the political party out of power.

“Over the last 50 years, five maps,” House Speaker Mike Madigan told reporters earlier this week. “Republicans have done one out of five. They’re angry, and this is part of their Republican politics. That’s all there is.”

Kolenc said both Republicans and Democrats have a lot invested in the current redistricting process, and he expects neither party to give that up without a fight.

Redistricting reformers expect to deliver their 500,000 signatures to Illinois’ State Board of Elections next week.

Contact Benjamin Yount at Ben@IllinoisWatchdog.org and find him on Twitter @BenYount.


From the Newsroom

QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 2 hours, 55 minutes ago

Illinois Companies Honored with President's 'E' Award http://t.co/qKNrro7isR
QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 2 hours, 55 minutes ago

What Can Be Done about a Water Shortage? http://t.co/nRIoNAuugc
QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 4 hours, 54 minutes ago

Walmart weighs in on antibiotics use in food animals http://t.co/rr0M3SwRQO
QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 4 hours, 54 minutes ago

Germanfest on June 6th http://t.co/536JsrcqqR