Friday, May 29, 2015
Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com

Recent Comments

Righty1 - Feds indict ex-House Speaker Hastert for allegedly hiding payments to apparent blackmailer - Quincy,
And Al Sharpton is still running around loose.
GuyFawkes10 - Feds indict ex-House Speaker Hastert for allegedly hiding payments to apparent blackmailer - Quincy,
you think the other individual claimed thus money on taxes?
eaglebeaky - Why won\'t the St. Louis Cardinals play Matt Holliday at first base? - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJourn
Very interesting article. For a whole lot of reasons, Matt Holliday does NOT seem like a reasonable/serviceable "quick fix" fill-in for Matt Adams over at first (certainly not for the remainder of the 2015 season). Holliday has never played there, and (to put it politely) he is a bit long in the tooth to start learning all of the ins-and-outs of playing a corner infield spot (especially in the middle…
DaveVictor - Feds indict ex-House Speaker Hastert for allegedly hiding payments to apparent blackmailer - Quincy,
Think Catholic priests, if they were public school wrestling coaches.
get0verit - Crider’s ETA in question - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Looks like he came in yesterday. see section 2 http://www.co.adams.il.us/jail/inmates/dailypop.p...

Most Popular

Two children safe after Fri abduction QJ Original

Quincy, Adams County want your feedback

Updated NASA Data: Global Warming Not Causing Any Polar Ice Retreat

Crider’s ETA in question QJ Original

28 Shootings, 9 Fatal, Over Memorial Day Weekend In Baltimore Video

Ameren Illinois customers could pay for Exelon's nuclear plants

Rauner Workers Comp bill defeated

Real Estate Transfers May 18 thru May 22nd

Illinois agencies outline cuts if forced to make 20% reductions

1 year, 2 months ago Doug Finke, State Journal-Register

Hundreds of employees would be laid off and state facilities would close, directors said

From Doug Finke, State Journal-Register:
Hundreds of employees would be laid off, state facilities would be closed and thousands of prison inmates released without supervision, state agency directors told senators Friday during a hearing to gauge the effect of possibly severe spending cuts next year.
During a more than three-hour joint hearing of the two Senate Appropriations committees, agency after agency warned of drastic consequences should they be forced to cut their current budgets by 20 percent.
“There would be extreme consequences for the economy across Illinois,” warned Ben Winick of Gov. Pat Quinn's budget office. “Over a dozen state facilities would have to close. Thousands of state employees would have to be laid off.”
The hearing occurred just days before Quinn is scheduled to finally deliver his budget outline for the fiscal year that starts July 1. Although the administration has been mum about details of what Quinn will propose, Friday's hearing could provide some insight.
Senate President John Cullerton, D-Chicago, has estimated the next budget will have a $2.9 billion hole that will have to be filled. About $1.6 billion of that is from the expiration of a major part of the temporary income tax hike at the end of 2014. The rest is from increased expenses the state has no control over, like more money to meet contractual pay raises, increased Medicaid expenses and higher pension payments.
Senate Democrats, who estimate that will require 20 percent reductions in state agency budgets, invited agency officials to detail Friday what those kinds of cuts would do to their operations.
Department of Corrections Director S.A. “Tony” Godinez said 11 correctional centers would have to close and more than 15,000 inmates would have to be released. A budget cut that drastic would result in more than 3,000 layoffs, he said.
Department of Juvenile Justice Acting Director Candice Jones said two facilities would have to close and 263 staff members would lose their jobs.
Illinois State Police Director Hiram Grau said 30 percent of the state's force would lose their jobs. Crime lab work would be seriously delayed or not done at all, he added.
The Department of Human Services testified that more than 1,000 jobs would be cut in its various departments. In addition, rates paid to community care providers of the developmentally disabled would have to be slashed, possibly resulting in violation of various court decrees the department operates under. Basic family welfare grants would have to be reduced and additional state facilities closed.

Click Here to Read Full Article


From the Newsroom

QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 38 minutes ago

Guthrie in the hunt at AT&T Byron Nelson after the second round http://t.co/hF1o1lhqD5
QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 2 hours, 34 minutes ago

QHS Graduation at Flinn Stadium tonight - Rain should miss area between 6:00 – 9:00 P.M. http://t.co/FRW2OrBEgZ
QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 2 hours, 34 minutes ago

The Age Of Disinformation - Veteran weatherman speaks out http://t.co/xHvRrlZ8ED
QuincyJournal on Twitter

QuincyJournal 3 hours, 38 minutes ago

Fifa re-elects Sepp Blatter as president http://t.co/qVln3Vh0jI