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Recent Comments

db1998 - Dreyer: “We think we’re in the right direction” - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.
I totally agree - now the "alleged" suspect has fled to Arizona doing his rap career but has a warrant out for his arrest from a failure to appear in Missouri for a Marijuana charge. Wonder how he got to leave, it would be a darn shame if Arizona got wind that he is a pot smoking, warrant holding kid that possibly shot a 12 year old.
GuyFawkes10 - QPD Blotter for April 25, 2015 - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Did his neighbor force him to impersonate?
UrKidsWillPay - QPD Blotter for April 25, 2015 - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
What kind of tactics are those....expecting someone to following the laws that have been on the books for decades?????????? Are we supposed to look the other way for nice guys and throw the book at people we don't like? Nobody is denying Brian the right to have a garage.....he already has one attached to his house and a 2,800 sq ft detached one as well. He's not exactly suffering a garage…
jnalse87 - Dreyer: “We think we’re in the right direction” - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.
No one can tell me the police don't know who did this.. They just need more evidence before making an arrest. Quincy talks too much for anything to go on here and the police not know about it. I think in this case a lot of threats have been made to keep a witness from coming forward. -Just my thoughts on the situation.
Rwalbring - QPD Blotter for April 25, 2015 - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Hard to believe what some people ( with an attorney) will do.This man is a outstanding business man, neighbor, and friend,and is being harassed by a neighbor who doesn't want him to build a garage, just isn't right that you can use these kind of tactics these days

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Supreme Court to Hear Case on Forced Unionization

1 year, 3 months ago Bill McMorris, Washington Free Beacon

At question is law requiring Illinois home healthcare workers to pay SEIU dues

From Bill McMorris, Washington Free Beacon:

The Supreme Court will hear arguments about forced unionization among government workers on Tuesday in a case that could greatly curtail powerful labor groups.

At issue is an Illinois law crafted by imprisoned former Gov. Rod Blagojevich (D.) and enforced by his successor Pat Quinn (D.) that forces home healthcare workers, including family members caring for relatives, to pay union dues.

The state claims that the caregivers are government employees since patients receive taxpayer dollars through Medicaid and Medicare. But the issue is more complicated than who is signing the checks, according to lawyers for the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation (NRTWLDF), which is spearheading the challenge.

“The Illinois law only defines them as employees in terms of unionization and no other rights at all,” said NRTWLDF lawyer Bill Messenger. “This is a scheme for compulsory lobbying.”

The caregivers do not receive liability insurance coverage or retirement benefits that other government workers are entitled to, according to Messenger. If the court holds that state governments can force any secondary beneficiary of taxpayer dollars in the union, “vast swaths of the population” would end up paying union dues.

“All doctors or nurses who care for Medicare patients would have to join a union by that logic,” Messenger said. “What unions are looking at is trying to attach themselves to any kind of government funding.”

 Harris v. Quinn could be a defining case in labor law, according to labor experts.

Justin Wilson, managing director of labor watchdog Center for Union Facts, said that forcing healthcare workers to pay union dues has been a cash cow for public sector unions, which enjoy a larger membership than private unions. Michigan unions, for example, benefitted from a similar policy that was eliminated by GOP Gov. Rick Snyder and later rejected by voters in a 2012 ballot initiative.

“Home healthcare workers have been ripe sources for Service Employees International Union, as they represent the largest pool of untapped resources,” Wilson said. “There’s real money on the line for the unions.”

The case could extend beyond Illinois and home healthcare workers. Messenger is pushing the justices to overturn the 1977 Abood v. Detroit Board of Education, which allowed governments to enforce compulsory union membership as a condition of employment.

If he is successful, public employees across the country could withdraw from their unions in a manner akin to Wisconsin Republican Gov. Scott Walker’s labor reforms.

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