Chicago Tribune
Tuesday, Nov 25, 2014
Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
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Recent Comments

GuyFawkes10 - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com - Illinois Senate committee votes to send minimum-wage hike to t
déjà vu, . $10.50 will be the new $8 and the government collects more taxes on $10.50. You haven't got any more buying power and the higher costs drive more business to foreign companies or states with lower wage. Maybe all the new 6th grade educated ILLEGAL aliens will get this minimum wage.
GuyFawkes10 - Quincy City Council votes to sell defaulting loans - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Next time the unpaid real estate tax bills are in the paper, look to see how many others have the same name.
ONCEMORE1 - Quincy City Council votes to sell defaulting loans - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
It would have just been in keeping with all the previous sales of that property. Sounds like if the Council goes through with the offer that's on the table now, they'll get all the losses and bad money out of the way right up front. Why not cut out the Middle Man and just have a million-dollar bonfire and weenie roast on the property right now and go back to business as usual?
CoolEdge - REBEL MEDIA: Grand Jury is NOT about Guilt or Innocence: Ferguson True Bill or No Bill? - Quincy, IL
hmmm ... well, it IS about innocence since there are lower standards for indictment (preponderance) than for conviction (beyond reasonable doubt). Of course if there is a trial both sides will have time to bring more facts, but the prosecutor is going to pretty much "bring it" to get at least to the level of an indictment, as I understand it. If he ain't got it for indictment, how's he…
UrKidsWillPay - Quincy City Council votes to sell defaulting loans - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
This is the same "Loser" everyone on here was clamoring to have as the owner of the Necomb property. What good would it have done to sell him more property he wouldn't have paid for?

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10 months, 4 weeks ago Chicago Tribune

Illinois Retired Teachers Association files first lawsuit in Cook County

From Chicago Tribune:

The Illinois Retired Teachers Association filed suit Friday challenging the constitutionality of the state’s historic but controversial plan to deal with the nation’s most underfunded public employee pension system.

The lawsuit is the first of what could be many filed on behalf of state workers, university employees, lawmakers and teachers outside Chicago. The legal challenge argues the law, which limits cost-of-living increases, raises retirement ages for many current workers and caps the amount of salaries eligible for retirement benefits, violates the state Constitution.

The lawsuit, filed in Cook County Circuit Court on behalf of eight non-union retirees, teachers and superintendents who are members of the state’s Teacher Retirement System, contended the constitutional “guarantee on which so many relied has been violated.”

“Countless careers, retirements, personal investments and medical treatments have been planned in justifiable reliance not only on the promises that were made in collective bargaining agreements and the Illinois Pension Code, but also on the guarantee of the (state constitution’s) Pension Protection Clause,” the lawsuit said.

But a spokeswoman for Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn, who signed the pension changes into law this month after years of political stalemate, said that just as a lawsuit had been expected, the administration “(expects) this landmark reform will be upheld as constitutional.”

At issue is a provision of the 1970 Illinois Constitution which states that public pensions represent“an enforceable contractual relationship, the benefits of which shall not be diminished or impaired.”

The new law, however, scales back what had been annual 3 percent compounded cost-of-living increases to retirees. Instead, retirees would get 3 percent, non-compounding yearly bumps based on a formula that takes into account their years of service multiplied by $1,000. The $1,000 factor would be increased by the rate of inflation each year.

The measure also requires many current workers to skip up to five annual cost-of-living pension increases when they retire. For current workers, it also would boost the retirement age by up to five years, depending on how old they are.

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Bob Gough 33 minutes ago

RT @olliander: Damn RT @viaSimonRomero: Brazil TV reporter. Car accident victim. This photo. #Amapá http://t.co/DRhQ5syqAU http://t.co/73Np4CWQ0S
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QuincyJournal 56 minutes ago

Kinder asks if Obama Ordered National Guard to Stand Down in Ferguson http://t.co/PrFpZdOGTY
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QuincyJournal 57 minutes ago

REBEL MEDIA: Dick is here to make it all better - His lecture on civil rights should be helpful... http://t.co/vmBoXUIRah
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Bob Gough 1 hour, 9 minutes ago

@stltoday That'll help.