Thursday, Apr 17, 2014
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Recent Comments

eaglebeaky - REBEL MEDIA: Did thin-skinned Peoria mayor sic police on Tweeter? - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.
The raid was "carried out by seven plainclothes officers" (and it sounds like additional officers who went to suspect's workplaces)? This certainly sounds like an excessive use (and by "use" I mean misuse) of police officers by Ardis -- especially for something like a Twitter account. How many officers are usually sent to arrest somebody for a non-violent offense? I can't help but think…
ONCEMORE1 - REBEL MEDIA: Holder cries that no attorney general has ever been treated like this - Quincy, IL News
Of course it is.........
vonvicious - City budget projected to increase by 3 percent - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
One would think if the police department has time to run seat belt enforcement that A) We have too many cops or B) The priorities of the PD are not in step with the public they are sworn to protect.
pjohnf - Illinois lawmakers to discuss money for Obama library - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Not only no but hell no let Obama get the funds for his lie emporium from his Hollywood buds, Wall st bankers and George Soros. Illinois taxpayers have enough money problems with state government without spending money on a Obama library. If Chicago want to waste money on a Obama hoax house let them pay for it.
QuincyJournal - Firefighters and Bus Drivers contracts to go to City Council - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
The aldermanic vote was 7-6. Moore's vote doesn't count as an aldermanic vote since he's the mayor. BG

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Retired teachers take aim at new pension reform law

3 months, 2 weeks ago Chicago Tribune

Illinois Retired Teachers Association files first lawsuit in Cook County

From Chicago Tribune:

The Illinois Retired Teachers Association filed suit Friday challenging the constitutionality of the state’s historic but controversial plan to deal with the nation’s most underfunded public employee pension system.

The lawsuit is the first of what could be many filed on behalf of state workers, university employees, lawmakers and teachers outside Chicago. The legal challenge argues the law, which limits cost-of-living increases, raises retirement ages for many current workers and caps the amount of salaries eligible for retirement benefits, violates the state Constitution.

The lawsuit, filed in Cook County Circuit Court on behalf of eight non-union retirees, teachers and superintendents who are members of the state’s Teacher Retirement System, contended the constitutional “guarantee on which so many relied has been violated.”

“Countless careers, retirements, personal investments and medical treatments have been planned in justifiable reliance not only on the promises that were made in collective bargaining agreements and the Illinois Pension Code, but also on the guarantee of the (state constitution’s) Pension Protection Clause,” the lawsuit said.

But a spokeswoman for Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn, who signed the pension changes into law this month after years of political stalemate, said that just as a lawsuit had been expected, the administration “(expects) this landmark reform will be upheld as constitutional.”

At issue is a provision of the 1970 Illinois Constitution which states that public pensions represent“an enforceable contractual relationship, the benefits of which shall not be diminished or impaired.”

The new law, however, scales back what had been annual 3 percent compounded cost-of-living increases to retirees. Instead, retirees would get 3 percent, non-compounding yearly bumps based on a formula that takes into account their years of service multiplied by $1,000. The $1,000 factor would be increased by the rate of inflation each year.

The measure also requires many current workers to skip up to five annual cost-of-living pension increases when they retire. For current workers, it also would boost the retirement age by up to five years, depending on how old they are.

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From the Newsroom

Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 30 minutes ago

RT @mikekelly1120: Have you heard of staying one step ahead of the posse?
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 1 hour, 11 minutes ago

@Mizzou2SEC If that's the case, he's the most clueless man on the planet. #probablyso
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 1 hour, 19 minutes ago

@JWHooch I won't argue that at all.
Bob Gough on Twitter

Bob Gough 1 hour, 19 minutes ago

@JWHooch Norm is in the Hall of Fame. Quin, Anderson and Haith won't be.