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CoolEdge - REBEL MEDIA: You\'re a grand old flag - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Were you there after Katrina or some other hurricane? That was a rather unique situation, and many of those billions got poured into the wrong pockets. (and any comparison to the war and famine of Somalia is absurd) That is the problem with throwing ever more billions into education or welfare or any top down political solution. There are always many lined up for political payback, and another…
pjohnf - Amending Illinois Constitution a tough path for pension reform - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Just because it's going to be hard to get done doesn't mean it shouldn't be attempted. Anything worth doing is going to be hard. The politicians need to stop worrying about their political futures and concentrate on doing what's right for Illinois and its citizens. Illinois politicians need to take care of the tax payers and quit kowtowing to government sector unions.
pjohnf - Quinn, Rauner use jobs claims as campaign weapons - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Governments or Governors don't create jobs, they can only create an atmosphere for private sector job growth. That means a low tax rate for businesses and less onerous regulations for businesses. The one good thing I saw was a decline in government jobs which is good thing. The unemployment rate is a bogus number as it doesn't truly reflect how many people are really working. What we need…
CoolEdge - REBEL MEDIA: You\'re a grand old flag - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
thanks for the link Not sure why it doesn't come right up with Google. I have to put "qteaparty.com " in for Google to bring it up. Just Qteaparty works for Bing, or even "quincy tea party". Anyway, maybe everyone here can do the search on Google, so the name will start coming up more easily on Google. I'll make it to a meeting one day ... looks like you've had good speakers, but…
AYHSMB - REBEL MEDIA: You\'re a grand old flag - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
If you really think about it, the government must want it this way, otherwise, they would try to change it. Anyway, if you read the comment section of eaglebeaky's post, and mine, you'll see there is much disagreement on how the numbers and stats are figured.

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Finally, IL (almost) agrees with taxpayers about pensions

7 months, 2 weeks ago By Benjamin Yount, Illinois Watchdog

“Illinois pension systems are just too rich to be afforded”

Illinois lawmakers have finally come to accept what most taxpayers in the state have known for years.

“Illinois pension systems are just too rich to be afforded,” Democratic House Speaker Mike Madigan said Tuesday as lawmakers began on a path to pension reform.

Madigan said Illinois cannot guarantee unionized, public employees 3 percent raises for the rest of their lives.

“We all got drawn into a trap, and we all talked about the (cost-of-living adjustment),” Madigan said. “The 3 percent compounded pay increase in retirement is the furthest thing from a COLA, because it has nothing to do with the cost of living.”

Debate continues over whether lawmakers could have — or should have — gone further with pension reform.

But the fact Illinois, a deep blue state, voted to stand up for taxpayers and stand against public employee unions shows how far the state has progressed over the past decade.

In 2005, then Gov. Rod Blagojevich — with union support — skipped Illinois’ pension payment.

That bill has come due, and lawmakers are now listening to taxpayers.

“The public is pushing us to do something. They want something done,” state Rep. Ed Sullivan, R-Mundelein, said. “A lot of people don’t have pensions. Their 401(k)’s have been diminished. And so, they are looking at this pension system as a special deal for a lot of folks.”

Illinois’ public employees decry the reforms, saying school teachers and public workers will now have to scrape to make ends meet in retirement.

State Rep. Jeanne Ives, R-Wheaton, says the unions should learn some basic math.

“The average (teacher) who worked for 30 years had a starting pension of over $72,000,” Ives said. “The average Social Security recipient receives just over $14,000, and they have to work almost a decade longer to receive that benefit.”

Illinois is spending nearly 25 percent of its money on retirement payments. Democrats know this.

“We have a crisis. We have a problem,” said state Rep. Elaine Nekritz, D-Northbrook.

Nekrtiz has said pension reforms are needed to ensure Illinois can pay for schools, roads and public safety. You know, to do the work of a functioning government.

Just a handful of Democrats are sticking by the adopted stance of public employee unions, which paint government workers as victims.

“(Pension reform) is actually no different than a thief coming into your house in the night and stealing your valuables,” state Sen. Linda Holmes, D-Aurora, said. “The difference is, this isn’t a thief coming in the night. This is your elected representative coming to you; looking you straight in the eye and saying, ‘I’m going to take away your future’.”

The next debate at the Illinois statehouse will be over how Democrats, who control state government, spend the $1.8 billion in “savings” from Tuesday’s pension reform vote.

Ives expects the Legislature to come back to pensions, because there’s more work to be done. “This is a step backward,” Ives said. “You’re actually asking the people that retire with $2 million pensions, and contribute about $120,000 of raw contributions, to pay less.”

If Illinois fails to end defined benefit pensions, and taxpayers flee the state, no one will be left to pay for the pension promises anyway, she said.


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