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Rwalbring - QPD Blotter for April 25, 2015 - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Hard to believe what some people ( with an attorney) will do.This man is a outstanding business man, neighbor, and friend,and is being harassed by a neighbor who doesn't want him to build a garage, just isn't right that you can use these kind of tactics these days
Rwalbring - QPD Blotter for April 25, 2015 - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Hard to believe what some people ( with an attorney) will do , this man is an outstanding ,neighbor,business man,and friend,and is being harassed by a neighbor,that doesn't want him to build a garage . Just not right that they can do this stuff to you now days
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Best thing that could happen to QU
qfingers - Kirk, Durbin praise Lynch\'s record after Senate vote - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Unfortunately Durbin's comment that she's "one of the finest" he has voted for is only a testament to the poor quality that has come before. I'm reminded of this...."When he left company X for comkpnay Y the average IQ of both places went up".
XBgCty - Illinois House Passes Bill To Make Some Marijuana Possession Punishable By Ticket - Quincy, IL News
People drink in their homes. Pot users if they did the same would be treated equally. When they smoke in public or in the vehicle they get treated the same as alcohol, they get locked up. It is Illegal to have open alcohol container in vehicle, or drink in public. Can't smoke tobacco in most buildings or get ticketed or arrested, same a pot. So it is kind of treated the same. Pot users want to…

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Illinois’ real pension crisis: Finding enough taxpayers to pay the bills

Illinois’ real pension crisis: Finding enough taxpayers to pay the bills

1 year, 6 months ago by Ben Yount, Illinois Watchdog

The top Democrat in the Illinois Senate says the state’s worst-in-the-nation pension debt is not a crisis. And he’s right.

Senate President John Cullerton points out that Illinois’ pension debt merely is slowly bankrupting the state.

Cullerton said the real crisis, in his mind, is making sure there is enough tax revenue to pay the states’ nearly $9 billion a year pension payment. But he is wrong.

Cullerton should be worried there are enough taxpayers to pay the bills.

Illinois have close to 1 million government workers — teachers, state employees, local cops and firefighters, and federal employees all due some sort of public pension.

But there only 4 million workers in both the public and private sectors combined, and the total public-sector pension debt is astronomical.

“The entire gross domestic product (GDP) of Illinois, the measure of all goods and services produced in the state, is only $644 billion,” Adam Andrzejewski, founder of the watchdog OpenTheBooks.com told Illinois Watchdog. “The teachers’ retirement plan is underfunded by estimates of $100-$200 billion. That’s up to one-third of everything produced by the entire economy in a year. It’s a crisis verging on bankruptcy.”

Andrzejewski said there is no way 75 percent of workers in Illinois can continue to guarantee 90 percent of the costs for “gold plated” public pensions for just 25 percent of workers.

“Those government employees have guaranteed salaries, generous sick time and vacation packages, most have 80-100 percent paid health insurance,” Andrzejewski said. “None of this is found amongst rank-and-file employees in the private sector.”

State Rep. Tom Morrison, R-Palatine, said Illinois needs to head off its real crisis and end defined-benefit public pensions. 

“The taxpayers that we are counting on to help subsidize retirements are getting more and more concerned about (paying) higher taxes,” Morrision said.

Morrison is one of a handful of lawmakers pushing for a 401(k)-style retirement plan.

“You preserve what (public employees) have earned up to this point,” Morrison said. “But going forward, you give them the ability to control their own retirement plans.”

Current pension reforms would only tweak the system for public employees. Illinois still will be facing billions of dollars in retirement costs while having to scale back services to the public.

Morrison said Illinois cannot afford to pay so much for pensions for so few.

“While (public employees) have a guarantee in the Constitution that says pension benefits cannot be diminished, there’s nothing in the Constitution that forces taxpayers to stay in Illinois,” Morrison said.


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