Friday, Aug 22, 2014
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State retiree insurance premiums dropping to pre-July 1 levels

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1950Brutus - Westview undergoing renovations, becoming more environmentally friendly - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJo
You are right about 1 thing here - I AM SPECIAL.
qfingers - City of Quincy looking to buy new garbage and recycle fleet - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
So here's another $1M we can save this year. Time to revisit contracting it out again.before we run down this rabbit hole. Nothing says we can't re-vote on this. What's that term again....money pit???
LNeck2012 - QND sees slight enrollment dip - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Of course the QND ACT composite is slightly higher. The "unruly, never going to learn anything kids" get dismissed and sent to QHS. Oh, look at that, QND is higher than QHS. Go figure.
LNeck2012 - City of Quincy looking to buy new garbage and recycle fleet - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Think of where this money could have actually been put to good use. But no, now we're stuck buying "new" old trucks to keep going in the recycle and trash business. Way to go Quincy people. God forbid we actually change something in this town. Hopefully this same stupidity doesn't affect the much needed bond referendum in November that needs to pass.
Expatriate - Ferguson police officer was badly beaten before shooting Michael Brown - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJou
This approach, obviously, makes a lot of sense. But I have a couple of problems. I don't want to see young men shot dead when other alternatives are available---even if they do something stupid like shove a cop or run at a cop or resist arrest. There's a real concern that police treat black and white suspects differently. I could run at a cop and yell, "I'm going to kill you" and the…

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Illinois’ real pension crisis: Finding enough taxpayers to pay the bills

Illinois’ real pension crisis: Finding enough taxpayers to pay the bills

9 months, 4 weeks ago by Ben Yount, Illinois Watchdog

The top Democrat in the Illinois Senate says the state’s worst-in-the-nation pension debt is not a crisis. And he’s right.

Senate President John Cullerton points out that Illinois’ pension debt merely is slowly bankrupting the state.

Cullerton said the real crisis, in his mind, is making sure there is enough tax revenue to pay the states’ nearly $9 billion a year pension payment. But he is wrong.

Cullerton should be worried there are enough taxpayers to pay the bills.

Illinois have close to 1 million government workers — teachers, state employees, local cops and firefighters, and federal employees all due some sort of public pension.

But there only 4 million workers in both the public and private sectors combined, and the total public-sector pension debt is astronomical.

“The entire gross domestic product (GDP) of Illinois, the measure of all goods and services produced in the state, is only $644 billion,” Adam Andrzejewski, founder of the watchdog OpenTheBooks.com told Illinois Watchdog. “The teachers’ retirement plan is underfunded by estimates of $100-$200 billion. That’s up to one-third of everything produced by the entire economy in a year. It’s a crisis verging on bankruptcy.”

Andrzejewski said there is no way 75 percent of workers in Illinois can continue to guarantee 90 percent of the costs for “gold plated” public pensions for just 25 percent of workers.

“Those government employees have guaranteed salaries, generous sick time and vacation packages, most have 80-100 percent paid health insurance,” Andrzejewski said. “None of this is found amongst rank-and-file employees in the private sector.”

State Rep. Tom Morrison, R-Palatine, said Illinois needs to head off its real crisis and end defined-benefit public pensions. 

“The taxpayers that we are counting on to help subsidize retirements are getting more and more concerned about (paying) higher taxes,” Morrision said.

Morrison is one of a handful of lawmakers pushing for a 401(k)-style retirement plan.

“You preserve what (public employees) have earned up to this point,” Morrison said. “But going forward, you give them the ability to control their own retirement plans.”

Current pension reforms would only tweak the system for public employees. Illinois still will be facing billions of dollars in retirement costs while having to scale back services to the public.

Morrison said Illinois cannot afford to pay so much for pensions for so few.

“While (public employees) have a guarantee in the Constitution that says pension benefits cannot be diminished, there’s nothing in the Constitution that forces taxpayers to stay in Illinois,” Morrison said.


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