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hotrod400 - Mayor Moore talks garbage...again - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Dish and Direct do not use City property for their systems. They are satellite based..."beam me down Scotty". Only physical presence is their antenna on your building or in your yard, both private property. Don't know about the phone company. But they are required to share their lines with other carriers. So, who pays that?
hotrod400 - Mayor Moore talks garbage...again - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
This whole trash fiasco started out with the TLE's (aka Kyle Moore) Director of Administrative Services thinking the cost of Workmen's Comp insurance premiums could be dramatically reduced if the City used the totes and trucks equipped with lift devices. The decision was made to offer that service to residents at a considerable cost increase over the sticker system. The totes cost $65 up…
Quijote57 - REBEL MEDIA: Bush v. Clinton...yawn - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Here here! We must remember that in 1856, the GOP was a fledgling upstart made up of former Whigs and a few Democrats. Then, once Lincoln won the White House in 1860, the GOP held the Presidency for most of the next 50 years, except for the two Cleveland terms. So there is hope for another party to rise and take the place of the Repulicrats/Democans. The sooner the better!
GuyFawkes10 - Mayor Moore talks garbage...again - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
do they charge Dish & Direct TV a fee? I thought the cable fee had something to do with them using city property to run their wire. Does phone company pay city also?
TheyRclueless - QPS Board approves higher 2014 tax levy - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
People.....there's secretaries at the Board Office making that kind of money, as well. Look that up, too.

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Illinois’ real pension crisis: Finding enough taxpayers to pay the bills

Illinois’ real pension crisis: Finding enough taxpayers to pay the bills

1 year, 1 month ago by Ben Yount, Illinois Watchdog

The top Democrat in the Illinois Senate says the state’s worst-in-the-nation pension debt is not a crisis. And he’s right.

Senate President John Cullerton points out that Illinois’ pension debt merely is slowly bankrupting the state.

Cullerton said the real crisis, in his mind, is making sure there is enough tax revenue to pay the states’ nearly $9 billion a year pension payment. But he is wrong.

Cullerton should be worried there are enough taxpayers to pay the bills.

Illinois have close to 1 million government workers — teachers, state employees, local cops and firefighters, and federal employees all due some sort of public pension.

But there only 4 million workers in both the public and private sectors combined, and the total public-sector pension debt is astronomical.

“The entire gross domestic product (GDP) of Illinois, the measure of all goods and services produced in the state, is only $644 billion,” Adam Andrzejewski, founder of the watchdog OpenTheBooks.com told Illinois Watchdog. “The teachers’ retirement plan is underfunded by estimates of $100-$200 billion. That’s up to one-third of everything produced by the entire economy in a year. It’s a crisis verging on bankruptcy.”

Andrzejewski said there is no way 75 percent of workers in Illinois can continue to guarantee 90 percent of the costs for “gold plated” public pensions for just 25 percent of workers.

“Those government employees have guaranteed salaries, generous sick time and vacation packages, most have 80-100 percent paid health insurance,” Andrzejewski said. “None of this is found amongst rank-and-file employees in the private sector.”

State Rep. Tom Morrison, R-Palatine, said Illinois needs to head off its real crisis and end defined-benefit public pensions. 

“The taxpayers that we are counting on to help subsidize retirements are getting more and more concerned about (paying) higher taxes,” Morrision said.

Morrison is one of a handful of lawmakers pushing for a 401(k)-style retirement plan.

“You preserve what (public employees) have earned up to this point,” Morrison said. “But going forward, you give them the ability to control their own retirement plans.”

Current pension reforms would only tweak the system for public employees. Illinois still will be facing billions of dollars in retirement costs while having to scale back services to the public.

Morrison said Illinois cannot afford to pay so much for pensions for so few.

“While (public employees) have a guarantee in the Constitution that says pension benefits cannot be diminished, there’s nothing in the Constitution that forces taxpayers to stay in Illinois,” Morrison said.


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