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yesqcy - Quincy City Budget hearings and Council meeting - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
I'm sorry, I just coventry haven't seen it, and I'm talking about the private sector. Heck fast food joints have given raises, min wage has increased, all my friend at blessing hospital and the medical group have given raises. I'm sorry, I just don't know what circle of people you're running with. And they've all without exception received more than 1%. The wage correction…
pjohnf - Quinn: New controls after Medicaid paid for dead - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Why is it with government bureaucrats that they always say they're going to close the barn door after the horse has left the barn? Millions in fraudulent payouts and now they find out. Only goes to prove once again that government is not the solution but government is truly the problem.
pjohnf - Rauner details some immigration views - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Anti-illegal immigration is not anti-legal immigration and Quinn knows it. It's disappointing that Rauner would side with the illegal immigration/amnesty crowd. It's insane and wrong to reward illegal behavior, illegal immigration, with any pathway to citizenship. Big business wants cheap labor and democrats want a new dependent class of voters and that's why both support immigration…
Righty1 - Quincy City Budget hearings and Council meeting - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
I have a question for you yesqcy. How many payroll checks have you written?
ONCEMORE1 - Quincy City Budget hearings and Council meeting - Quincy, IL News - QuincyJournal.com
Tell that to people (Private Sector, of course) who have taken pay CUTS, shortened hours or loss of benefits just to remain employed. Somehow, I feel your comments come more from attitude and opinion than knowledge and experience.

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Illinois’ real pension crisis: Finding enough taxpayers to pay the bills

Illinois’ real pension crisis: Finding enough taxpayers to pay the bills

5 months, 4 weeks ago by Ben Yount, Illinois Watchdog

The top Democrat in the Illinois Senate says the state’s worst-in-the-nation pension debt is not a crisis. And he’s right.

Senate President John Cullerton points out that Illinois’ pension debt merely is slowly bankrupting the state.

Cullerton said the real crisis, in his mind, is making sure there is enough tax revenue to pay the states’ nearly $9 billion a year pension payment. But he is wrong.

Cullerton should be worried there are enough taxpayers to pay the bills.

Illinois have close to 1 million government workers — teachers, state employees, local cops and firefighters, and federal employees all due some sort of public pension.

But there only 4 million workers in both the public and private sectors combined, and the total public-sector pension debt is astronomical.

“The entire gross domestic product (GDP) of Illinois, the measure of all goods and services produced in the state, is only $644 billion,” Adam Andrzejewski, founder of the watchdog OpenTheBooks.com told Illinois Watchdog. “The teachers’ retirement plan is underfunded by estimates of $100-$200 billion. That’s up to one-third of everything produced by the entire economy in a year. It’s a crisis verging on bankruptcy.”

Andrzejewski said there is no way 75 percent of workers in Illinois can continue to guarantee 90 percent of the costs for “gold plated” public pensions for just 25 percent of workers.

“Those government employees have guaranteed salaries, generous sick time and vacation packages, most have 80-100 percent paid health insurance,” Andrzejewski said. “None of this is found amongst rank-and-file employees in the private sector.”

State Rep. Tom Morrison, R-Palatine, said Illinois needs to head off its real crisis and end defined-benefit public pensions. 

“The taxpayers that we are counting on to help subsidize retirements are getting more and more concerned about (paying) higher taxes,” Morrision said.

Morrison is one of a handful of lawmakers pushing for a 401(k)-style retirement plan.

“You preserve what (public employees) have earned up to this point,” Morrison said. “But going forward, you give them the ability to control their own retirement plans.”

Current pension reforms would only tweak the system for public employees. Illinois still will be facing billions of dollars in retirement costs while having to scale back services to the public.

Morrison said Illinois cannot afford to pay so much for pensions for so few.

“While (public employees) have a guarantee in the Constitution that says pension benefits cannot be diminished, there’s nothing in the Constitution that forces taxpayers to stay in Illinois,” Morrison said.


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@ChrisDuerr I'd be fine with that.